Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Will Mitt Romney's defeat force a Tory party rethink? No chance (Guardian)
Many Conservative MPs can see what's going wrong for the party, but their prescriptions are all for more of the same, writes Polly Toynbee.

2. A good day for David Cameron, but a rout for the Tory Right’s vision (Telegraph)
David Cameron and George Osborne must learn from Mitt Romney’s defeat and rethink Conservative election strategy for 2015, writes Peter Oborne.

3. Our dangerous illusion of tech progress (Financial Times) (£)
The actual landscape around us is almost identical to the 1960s. Our ability to do basic things such as protect ourselves from earthquakes and hurricanes, to travel and to extend our lifespans is barely increasing, write Garry Kasparov and Peter Thiel.

4. The venerable FT is too valuable to sell off (Times) (£)
The market isn’t infallible. The sale of certain businesses is against the national interest, writes William Rees-Mogg.

5. There's a chance of a deal with Iran. Is a re-elected President Obama brave enough to seize it? (Independent)
Ahmadinejad's regime is worried, and not just about the currency crisis, writes Adrian Hamilton.

6. World crowds in on Obama’s second term (Financial Times) (£)
Mr Obama’s re-election has changed the dynamics of American politics, writes Philip Stephens.

7. The Greek books are still being cooked (Telegraph)
This week saw yet more austerity measures voted by the Greek parliament for yet another bail-out that won’t be repaid, writes Jeremy Warner

8. Jordan: threatened by the drama next door (Guardian)
As long as King Abdullah's regime continues to block genuine reform its ability to resist contagion from Syria's turmoil will weaken, writes David Hirst

9. Not long a bishop? Perfectly qualified then (Times) (£)
Justin Welby has had success in non-churchy experience, so the real world is not alien to him, writes Diarmaid MacCulloch.

10. Drop this Great British fetish with childhood (Independent)
For all the outcry over deviant stars, most abuse is committed by someone known to the child, writes Mary Dejevsky.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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