'More rational policies, less gesture politics'

The Association of British Drivers (ABD) gives its take on the policies of the main London Mayor can

Drivers have been penalised by policies introduced by Ken Livingstone over the last few years. Is that surprising considering his alleged past comments of, “I hate cars"? Private cars are still the most frequent mode of transport for Londoners, and are essential for anyone living in the suburbs. But we have faced the London Congestion Charge, increased penalties for trivial traffic infringements, swingeing penalties for accidental parking infringements, cameras that spy on us all the time and the transfer of public road space for reserved use by buses, taxis and cyclists. Even traffic lights have been re-phased to give more time to pedestrians and less to road users, with no obvious need or benefit.

The London Congestion Charge has been an abject failure, with the charge increased from the initial £5 to £8, and soon it will be £25 for larger vehicles. But with 70% of the revenue going into operating the system, this must make it one of the most inefficient taxes ever. Traffic speeds are now almost back to what they were before the charge was introduced. Even the environmental benefit is illusory with no reduction in air pollution as measured within the congestion charge zone, despite the false propaganda that emanates from the Mayor and Transport for London.

How do the other mayoral candidates line up on this issue? The Association of British Drivers would like to see the Congestion Charge scrapped as we are opposed to all forms of road pricing but only the UK Independence Party candidate Gerald Batten would go that far. Conservative candidate Boris Johnson would reform it in several ways. Firstly he would redo the consultation on the western extension and listen to the results – and there is nothing like true democracy. Secondly he would change the system to be “account based” so that accidental penalties could not be incurred, and review other aspects of the system. He would also abandon the £25 Congestion Charge proposal which even TfL admits has no possible environmental benefit. So he goes some way in the right direction.

Brian Paddick of the Liberal Democrats seems to be confused, with policies to scrap the western extension and the £25 charge, but he wants to introduce a new £10 charge to enter the Greater London cordon. No votes there amongst our members for sure.

However both Paddick and Johnson support rephrasing of traffic lights and the vigorous tackling of the problem of road works which we can wholeheartedly support.

What the ABD would like to see is a more rational approach to the road transport problems of London. We do not like the “gesture politics” promoted by Mr Livingstone – unnecessary attacks on car drivers in the spurious name of road safety or environmental benefit. We would also like more attention given to the economic issues associated with such policies. Therefore we are keen to improve the air quality of London and reduce unnecessary emissions from road vehicles, but we opposed to the way the Mayor introduced the Low Emission Zone – a massive cost with almost no benefit.

We would like a new mayor who listens democratically to all Londoners, including car drivers, and does not treat us like second class citizens to be hobbled and pilloried all the time. Private cars are a massive convenience to most Londoners and there are few practical alternatives for many purposes. Let’s stop discriminating against car drivers in favour of bus users, cyclists or anyone else. Policies should be practical not impractical. For example 20 mph zones everywhere are difficult to adhere to and impossible to enforce. Road safety policies should be dictated by real evidence not fanciful claims (road deaths in London are not falling significantly despite the rash of speed humps, 20 mph zones, speed cameras and other attacks on road users in recent years).

London’s transport system will not grind to a halt if we stop discouraging car use – in reality traffic levels in London have remained remarkably constant over the years because they are self regulating despite the rise in car numbers. Traffic levels have even fallen in outer London boroughs in recent years.

No we don’t need to remove cars from London at all. Just take some sensible steps to reduce pollution (already falling rapidly of course) and reduce the congestion that they cause by some sensible traffic management measures.

Roger Lawson is the London Region Coordinator of the Association of British Drivers

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