Labour MPs for Trident

A list of the Labour MPs who voted 'yes' for Trident

Following are names of the 235 Labour MPs voted on 14 March in favour of an amendemnt to renew the Trident nuclear missile system.

Nick Ainger
Bob Ainsworth
Douglas Alexander
Graham Allen
David Anderson
Janet Anderson
Hilary Armstrong
Ian Austin
Adrian Bailey
Vera Baird
Edward Balls
Celia Barlow
Kevin Barron
John Battle
Margaret Beckett
Hilary Benn
Clive Betts
Liz Blackman
Roberta Blackman-Woods
Tony Blair
Hazel Blears
Bob Blizzard
David Blunkett
David Borrow
Ben Bradshaw
Kevin Brennan
Gordon Brown
Nick Brown
Russell Brown
Des Browne
Chris Bryant
Andy Burnham
Stephen Byers
Liam Byrne
Richard Caborn
David Cairns
Alan Campbell
Ian Cawsey
Ben Chapman
Paul Clark
Tom Clarke
David Clelland
Vernon Coaker
Ann Coffey
Rosie Cooper
Yvette Cooper
David Crausby
Mary Creagh
Jim Cunningham
Tony Cunningham
Claire Curtis-Thomas
Alistair Darling
Wayne David
John Denham
Parmjit Dhanda
Brian H Donohoe
Jim Dowd
Angela Eagle
Maria Eagle
Louise Ellman
Natascha Engel
Paul Farrelly
Frank Field
Jim Fitzpatrick
Robert Flello
Caroline Flint
Barbara Follett
Michael Foster
Hywel Francis
Mike Gapes
Barry Gardiner
Bruce George
Linda Gilroy
Paul Goggins
Helen Goodman
Andrew Gwynne
Peter Hain
Mike Hall
David Hanson
Harriet Harman
Tom Harris
John Healey
Doug Henderson
Mark Hendrick
Stephen Hepburn
John Heppell
Stephen Hesford
Patricia Hewitt
Keith Hill
Meg Hillier
Margaret Hodge
Sharon Hodgson
Geoff Hoon
Phil Hope
George Howarth
Kim Howells
Lindsay Hoyle
Beverley Hughes
Joan Humble
John Hutton
Brian Iddon
Eric Illsley
Adam Ingram
Huw Irranca-Davies
Brian Jenkins
Alan Johnson
Diana Johnson
Helen Jones
Kevan Jones
Martyn Jones
Tessa Jowell
Eric Joyce
Gerald Kaufman
Sally Keeble
Barbara Keeley
Alan Keen
Ann Keen
Ruth Kelly
Fraser Kemp
Jane Kennedy
Piara S Khabra
Sadiq Khan
David Kidney
Jim Knight
Ashok Kumar
Stephen Ladyman
David Lammy
Bob Laxton
Tom Levitt
Ivan Lewis
Martin Linton
Andrew Love
Ian Lucas
John MacDougall
Khalid Mahmood
Shahid Malik
John Mann
Rob Marris
Eric Martlew
Thomas McAvoy
Stephen McCabe
Kerry McCarthy
Sarah McCarthy-Fry
Ian McCartney
Siobhain McDonagh
Patrick McFadden
John McFall
Anne McGuire
Shona McIsaac
Rosemary McKenna
Tony McNulty
Gillian Merron
Alun Michael
Alan Milburn
David Miliband
Edward Miliband
Andrew Miller
Anne Moffat
Laura Moffatt
Chris Mole
Madeleine Moon
Elliot Morley
Kali Mountford
Meg Munn
Jim Murphy
Paul Murphy
Dan Norris
Mike O'Brien
Edward O'Hara
Bill Olner
Albert Owen
Nick Palmer
Ian Pearson
James Plaskitt
Greg Pope
Bridget Prentice
John Prescott
Dawn Primarolo
James Purnell
Bill Rammell
Nick Raynsford
Jamie Reed
John Reid
John Robertson
Geoffrey Robinson
Terry Rooney
Frank Roy
Christine Russell
Joan Ryan
Martin Salter
Alison Seabeck
Jonathan R Shaw
Barry Sheerman
Jim Sheridan
Siôn Simon
Andrew Slaughter
Angela Smith
Angela Smith
Jacqui Smith
John Smith
Anne Snelgrove
Helen Southworth
John Spellar
Phyllis Starkey
Howard Stoate
Jack Straw
Gisela Stuart
Gerry Sutcliffe
Mark Tami
Dari Taylor
Gareth Thomas
Stephen Timms
Paddy Tipping
Don Touhig
Neil Turner
Derek Twigg
Kitty Ussher
Keith Vaz
Lynda Waltho
Claire Ward
Tom Watson
Dave Watts
Malcolm Wicks
Alan Williams
Michael Wills
Rosie Winterton
Shaun Woodward
Phil Woolas
David Wright
Iain Wright
Tony Wright
Derek Wyatt

Hana Bieliauskas is a junior at Ohio University majoring in magazine journalism. She is currently studying in London.
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An English hero for the ages: Ian Botham at 60

Botham blends his sportsmanship and deep-seated passion for cricket with a lust for life.

Begging W H Auden’s pardon, it is possible both to honour and to value the vertical man, and in the case of Ian Botham, who turned 60 on 24 November, it is our bounden duty. No sportsman has given Britons so much to enjoy in the past half-century and no sportsman is loved more. Two decades after he retired from first-class cricket, his reputation as one of life’s champions remains unassailable.

No mere cricketer is he, either. Botham is a philanthropist, having raised more than £12m for various charities, notably Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research. In December, 30 years after his first walk from John o’Groats to Land’s End, he will set off again, in South Africa, where England are on tour. And he really does walk, too, not amble. As somebody who accompanied him on one of his dozen walks said: “You can’t keep up with him. The man is a phenomenon.”

Of all postwar sportsmen, only Bobby Charlton and, at a pinch, Henry Cooper come close to matching Botham’s enduring popularity. But Charlton, a shy man who was scarred by the Munich plane crash of 1958 (and may never have recovered from its emotional effects), has never comfortably occupied a public stage; and Cooper, being a boxer, had a solitary role. Botham, by contrast, spoke for England. Whenever he picked up his bat, or had a ball in his hand, he left spectators in no doubt.

Others have also spoken for England. Bobby Moore and Martin Johnson, captains respectively of England’s World Cup-winning football and rugby teams, were great players but did not reach out to people as naturally as Botham. Nick Faldo, Lester Piggott, Sebastian Coe and, to bring us up to date, Lewis Hamilton have beaten the best in the world, but they lacked those qualities that Botham displayed so freely. That is not to mark them down. They were, and are, champions. But Botham was born under a different star.

It was John Arlott, the great cricket commentator, who first spotted his uniqueness. Covering a match at Taunton in 1974, he asked the young colt to carry his bags up the rickety staircase to the press box, where Arlott, wearing his oenophile’s hat, pulled out a bottle of red wine and invited Botham to drink. Forty years later Botham is a discriminating wine drinker – and maker. Along with his friend and fellow England great Bob Willis, and their Australian wine­making pal Geoff Merrill, he has put his name to a notable Shiraz, “BMW”.

Arlott, with his nose for talent and good company, saw something in the young Botham that Brian Close, his captain at Somerset, was beginning to bring out. Later, Mike Brearley, as England captain, drew out something even more remarkable. As Rodgers and Hammerstein wrote, you’ve got to be carefully taught. And Botham, a fine team man as well as a supreme individual performer, has never withheld praise from those who enabled him to find his voice.

If sport reveals character, then cricket is the game that reveals it most clearly. In no other sport is the individual performance rooted so firmly in a team context. Every over brings a contest of skill and intelligence between batsman and bowler but only a team can win the match. “A cricketer,” as Arlott said, “is showing you something of himself all the time.”

Cricket also reveals national character more than any other sport. Football may be the most popular game in the world but cricket, and cricketers, tell us far more about England and Englishness. It is instructive, in this regard, to hear what Philippe Auclair, a French journalist and author long resident in London, has to say about Botham: “He is essentially an 18th-century Englishman.” In one! It’s not difficult to sense a kinship with Tom Jones, Fielding’s embodiment of 18th-century life, who began his journey, as readers may recall, in Somerset.

A country boy who played for Worcestershire after leaving Somerset, and who lives by choice in North Yorkshire, Botham is an old-fashioned Englishman. Although nobody has yet found him listening to the parson’s sermon, he is conservative with a small and upper-case C, a robust monarchist, handy with rod and gun, and happiest with a beaker in front of him. He represents (though he would never claim to be a representative) all those people who understand instinctively what England means, not in a narrow way, but through something that is in the blood.

Above all, he will be remembered for ever as the hero of 1981. Even now it takes some believing that Botham bowled and batted with such striking success that the Australians, who were one up after two Tests, were crushed. Some of us who were actually at Headingley for the famous third Test – thousands who claim to have been there were not – recall the odds of 500-1 on an England victory going up on the electronic scoreboard that Saturday evening.

Botham made 149 not out as England, following on, beat the Aussies by 18 runs. For three hours the country seemed to stop. In the next Test, at Edgbaston, Botham took five wickets for one run as Australia fell under his spell. Then, at Old Trafford, on a dank Saturday afternoon, he played the most memorable innings of his life and one of the greatest innings ever played by an Englishman: 118 magnificent, joyful runs. Joy: that’s the word. Botham brought joy into people’s lives.

Yet it was the final Test at the Oval, which ended in a draw, that brought from him a performance no less remarkable than those from before. He bowled 89 overs in that match, flat out, continuing to run in when others withdrew with injury. That was the team man coming to the fore. Little wonder his comrades thought the world of him.

Modest, loyal, respectful to opponents, grateful to all who have lent him a hand, and supported throughout a turbulent life by Kath, his rock of a wife, and their three children, this is a cricketing hero to rank with W G Grace, Jack Hobbs, Wally Hammond and Fred Trueman. A feature in the lives of all who saw him, and a very English hero. 

This article first appeared in the 26 November 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Terror vs the State