In this week's New Statesman podcast

Alien life, Conservative campaigning and hating on music festivals.

You can get the New Statesman podcast every Friday from newstatesman.com/podcast, through this RSS feed newstatesman.libsyn.com/rss or by subscribing in iTunes. Alternatively, you can listen using the web player embedded below.

This week, George Eaton (editor of our excellent Staggers blog) talks to the Conservative campaigner David Skelton. They discuss his ideas to bring about a resurgence in support for the Conservatives in the north of England and among working class voters and ethnic minorities.
 
I also attempted to join in with a conversation about the search for extra-terrestrial life between our science columnist Michael Brooks and our economics bloger (aka junior space correspondent) Alex Hern. Apparently, for the bargain price of £1m a year, the UK could be among the first to make contact with the little green men. Or something like that.
 
Our superb blogger Alex Andreou chatted to Helen Lewis about the current situation in Greece, as well as touching on the oft-rehearsed argument of BBC bias. If you've enjoyed Alex's posts on how George Osborne is like Fernando Torres only less effective or the unvarnished bigotry of Ukip, you have to listen to this.
 
Lastly, Eleanor Margolis - of Lez Miserable blog fame - enlarges on why exactly it is she hates music festivals so much.
 
Happy listening!
 

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

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Are celebrities deliberately messing up their award show performances?

How the "accidental" tumble came to dominate awards season.

The first thing I saw about last night’s Brit awards is that during Katy Perry’s performance of her new single “Chained to the Rhythm” a dancer – dressed as a house – fell off the stage.

This housing crisis is the most meme-able and memorable moment of the entire awards ceremony, but not because it’s anything new. The house follows in the (tumbling) footsteps of Madonna, who in 2015 fell over on the Brits’ stage after a dancer stood on her giant, flowing cape.

If it seems strange that some of the world’s biggest and best known artists are prone to hiring clumsy back-up dancers, it should. Since I’m-so-normal-in-my-$4m-Dior-dress Jennifer Lawrence fell over at the Oscars in 2013, there has been a spate of televised celebrity mishaps.

In 2014, normal-oh-so-normal J Law decided to take another Oscars tumble. In 2015, Perry’s back-up dancer at the Super Bowl, Left Shark, shot to meme fame for its clumsy and out-of-time dance moves. This New Year’s, Mariah Carey gave a self-described “mess” of a performance.

So is this just a coincidence? After all, celebrities have always had live performance mishaps, the most famous being Justin Timberlake exposing Janet Jackson’s breast during the 2004 Super Bowl. But in the late Tens, thanks to social media, mishaps have become the fastest and easiest way to get talked about. After all, when’s the last time anyone on Twitter recommended a mainstream celebrity’s performance because it was “so very touching and good”?

The proof is in the numbers. Left Shark’s dance moves helped 2015 to become the most Tweeted about Super Bowl ever, with numbers dropping dramatically in 2016 (where Coldplay had no mishap other than their continued existence). Tweets and statuses are one thing, of course, and money is another. After her 2015 performance, Perry started selling Left Shark merchandise in her official online store. Mishaps are profitable in more ways than one.

Social media has therefore revolutionised the celebrity mishap, but so too have the phones from which we post our updates. The fact more of us take our smartphones to live shows means that the public can catch mishaps that might traditionally have been brushed under the rug (or cape). It was an audience member, after all, that caught Perry’s falling house on camera.

Short of a shark/house whistle blower, however, there is no definitive proof of this new celebrity conspiracy theory. Yet when it is known that marketers deliberately outrage consumers to drum up publicity, we have to wonder what PR teams wouldn’t do? A small tumble, after all, is a small price to pay to reach new heights. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.