An owl
Everything is awful, vote for owls
By Laurie Penny - 20 June 17:59

I was preparing myself to vote Labour with gritted teeth if there were no good Green candidates in my area but I’d feel far less dirty about the whole thing if I knew I was getting my own owl. 

Welsh Labour sign. Photo: Getty
The Tories belittle Wales, but Labour is learning from it
By Owen Smith - 20 June 17:58

The Welsh economy is bucking generational trends and leading the UK out of recession.

One of the first great political broadcasters: Clement Attlee in 1950. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Clement Attlee, the original Ed Miliband
By Francis Beckett - 20 June 15:01

Attlee had an image. A wise man, he made his image rather like the real thing – quiet, cricket-loving, terse, a suburban bank manager – and it resonated with the times.

Natural justice, not merely the law, must be seen to be applied in cases of wrongdoing.
The Mike Hancock saga shows that politicians can't be judged by the law alone
By Richard Morris - 20 June 14:26

Natural justice, not merely the law, must be seen to be applied in cases of wrongdoing.

Work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith. Photo: Getty
The Tories are set to breach their own welfare spending cap – here’s why
By Sheila Gilmore - 20 June 12:55

Despite all the distress and financial hardship caused by a malfunctioning assessment process, spending on the government’s main sickness and disability benefit is set to rise.

The Heygate Estate is being reduced to rubble. Photo: Sophie Foster
Sanitised nostalgia won’t bring back the communities destroyed to make way for luxury flats
By Sophie Foster - 20 June 12:22

The new “regeneration” in places like Elephant and Castle in south London destroys social housing, and then invites those who have been forced out to help “preserve” the history and culture of the area.

Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith. Photo: Getty
The government is tripping up on welfare – a blessing and a curse for Labour
By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 June 8:24

A slew of welfare stories this morning suggests the coalition is stumbling over its biggest bugbear: the benefits bill. Labour should play this carefully – in economic, not social, terms.

The party would lose seven of its 11 most marginal seats to the Tories.
Lord Ashcroft's poll undermines the Lib Dems' optimism
By George Eaton - 19 June 16:04

The party would lose seven of its 11 most marginal seats to the Tories. 

Commons Confidential: potshots at the Lords
By Kevin Maguire - 19 June 14:05

“I am recruiting for this year’s Lords v Commons full-bore rifle competition,” the 12th Baron Lucas emailed peers…

Overcrowded hostels and expensive B&Bs can lead to people sleeping on the streets. Photo: Getty
Life in limbo: what it’s like to be one of Britain’s hidden homeless
By Frances Ryan - 19 June 12:41

The threat of people losing their home if they rent is at its highest level in more than a decade.

The taste for freedom: questions raised by campaigners for Scottish independence signal directions for a refreshed democracy for all Britons. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images
Union does not mean uniform
By Gordon Brown - 19 June 11:31

Are we moving to a federal United Kingdom and a written constitution?

Sharp tactics: the spikes on the ground outside a London block of flats which sparked outrage. Photo: Getty
Laurie Penny: A war on homelessness should mean shelter, not metal spikes
By Laurie Penny - 19 June 10:00

Rough sleeping has almost doubled in London in the past few years and private businesses are making it tough for the new homeless to put down their blankets.

Very vocal: Danny Alexander at the Lib Dem Party Conference 2013. Photo: Getty
Teaching MPs to twist the truth
By Lucy Fisher - 19 June 10:00

A bland, polished performance style has become the norm among politicians. “The rise of the political class” refers as much to the homogeneity of politicians’ public personae as anything else. 

Jon Cruddas. Photo: Getty
How councils are already delivering the Cruddas agenda
By Simon Parker - 19 June 6:27

If you want to know what a Miliband government might look like, you should start by paying a visit to your local town hall.

In an age of fiscal famine, the tax and spend policies of the past are no longer an option.
Stuck on a burning platform – and with no money to give away – Labour is turning radical
By George Eaton - 18 June 22:22

In an age of fiscal famine, the tax and spend policies of the past are no longer an option.

With the old tax and spend model broken, Labour has been forced to be radical.
Miliband reimagines welfare for an era of austerity
By George Eaton - 18 June 22:00

With the old tax and spend model broken, Labour has been forced to be radical.

No matter the political situation, it's always the economics that triumphs in the end. Photo: Getty
The best currency for an independent Scotland would be Norway’s kronor
By Piotr Marek Jaworski - 18 June 17:10

If Scotland votes for independence, it will create a completely different economic context for the two new countries that emerge.

Mad or bad? Ex-PM Tony Blair in Hong Kong, 2012. Photo: Getty
Blair’s supporters should stage a humanitarian intervention – and make him shut up about Iraq
By Mehdi Hasan - 18 June 17:02

How many Sure Start centres cancel out the depleted uranium used in Fallujah? Why does record investment in the NHS absolve the torture and abuse in Abu Ghraib?

The party president contradicts Nick Clegg's position on a future hung parliament.
Tim Farron: Lib Dems must not rule out support for a minority government
By George Eaton - 18 June 15:02

The party president contradicts Nick Clegg's position on a future hung parliament.

The PM's blast against Jean-Claude Juncker delighted his MPs - but he'll let them down in the end.
PMQs review: Cameron should be wary of playing to the eurosceptic gallery
By George Eaton - 18 June 13:26

The PM's blast against Jean-Claude Juncker delighted his MPs - but he'll let them down in the end.

Technology can even free teachers from admin, leaving more time to devlote to pupils. Photo: Getty
The latest learning technology can raise standards of education for everyone
By Matthew Hancock - 18 June 12:25

To get the best out of it, investment in learning technology needs to be results driven.

Without new money, the health service will be condemned to years of dangerous decline.
The NHS funding crisis is now impossible to ignore - which party will grip it?
By George Eaton - 18 June 9:07

Without new money, the health service will be condemned to years of dangerous decline. 

Sixty per cent believe immigration has benefited Britain and are much more likely to be pro-EU.
Why graduates are the biggest obstacle to Ukip's advance
By Tim Wigmore - 17 June 14:48

Sixty per cent believe immigration has benefited Britain and are much more likely to be pro-EU.

Tristram Hunt. Photo: Getty
What happened to Tristram Hunt, and where is Labour’s radicalism on education?
By Dan Holden - 17 June 13:05

After a strong start, the shadow education secretary's voice is absent from the education debate, and his party is being reactive and not proactive on education. They have less than a year to turn this around.

"Edinburgh's disgrace", Calton Hill: the lack of a national 6 o'clock news is a big problem for Scotland. Photo: Getty
The lack of a Scottish Six O’Clock News is a major democratic flaw
By Angus Roxburgh - 17 June 12:34

Viewers in Scotland have to sit through half-hour bulletins that may have no domestic news relevant to their lives, before Scottish news is broadcast as a budget regional news programme. 

The Labour peer and Miliband strategist on how the party would seek to reduce inequality.
Interview: Stewart Wood responds to Thomas Piketty
By George Eaton - 17 June 9:59

The Labour peer and Miliband strategist on how the party would seek to reduce inequality.

A review of the French economist's appearance with Miliband strategist Stewart Wood.
Thomas Piketty comes to parliament: what we learned
By George Eaton - 16 June 16:02

A review of the French economist's appearance with Miliband strategist Stewart Wood.
 

How the miners’ strike of 1984-85 changed Britain for ever
By Donald Macintyre - 16 June 11:15

Thirty years later questions still haunt many of those who took part. Could the outcome have been different?

Ninety six per cent of people support a fairer system, with the richest paying more than double the poorest.
The public want a more progressive tax system - and they're right
By Duncan Exley - 16 June 10:24

Ninety six per cent of people support a fairer system, with the richest paying more than double the poorest.

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