It's finally acceptable to cast off the shackles of TV snobbery
By Bim Adewunmi - 27 June 12:11

Who knows, Bim Adewunmi might even give the next series Big Brother a go.

John Lydon on BBC 6 Music: When he was bad, he was rotten
By Antonia Quirke - 27 June 8:53

Antonia Quirke's take on the stand-in presenter for <em>Jarvis Cocker’s Sunday Service</em> on BBC 6 Music.

The White Queen on BBC1: A historical drama that's barely medieval at all
By Rachel Cooke - 27 June 8:49

Where are the lantern jaws and bowl haircuts, the suppurating pustules and the decaying teeth? Where is the dirt?

The Beach Boys Story on BBC 6 Music: Surfing the airwaves
By Antonia Quirke - 20 June 14:45

While there are those who will tell you that <em>Pet Sounds</em> is one of the most influential records of all time, the Beach Boys could be proper tedious.

The Returned and The Fall: Death warmed up
By Rachel Cooke - 20 June 14:31

A zombie thriller and a crime drama that ask you to suspend your disbelief.

The White Queen: romance, sex, magic, scowling, social snobbery and battles
By Amy Licence - 17 June 9:22

The BBC's new Sunday night drama set in the Wars of the Roses might not quite tick all historical boxes, but it's likely to become required Sunday night viewing.

Why I can't stand Clare Balding
By Will Self - 14 June 10:16

Will Self's "Madness of Crowds" column.

The Nestlé ad.
Despite everything, television still has an extraordinary amount of power
By Bim Adewunmi - 14 June 10:12

The response to Nestlé featuring a mixed race family in an advert for Cheerios shows that the medium is still deeply conservative.

Disability, a New History on Radio 4: We can't get enough
By Antonia Quirke - 13 June 10:35

We’ve hear diaries of the disabled from all centuries, discarded flyers for freak shows, letters between aristocrats disfigured by smallpox and grappling with wooden limbs, and an account of Samuel Pepys visiting a lady with a beard (“It was a strange sig

The Americans is Homeland without the hawks or the hysteria
By Rachel Cooke - 13 June 10:30

A thriller with a delicious setup - all credit to ITV for bagging it.

Modern feminists can learn a lot from Suffragette sitcom "Up the Women"
By Rhiannon and Holly - 12 June 11:15

Many of the questions faced by the women's movement today are played out in Jessica Hynes' new show. In a world where feminism still viewed by many women with distrust, wariness and even alarm, there's a lot we can learn from the ladies of the Banbury Int

An Arctic Tern pecks a man's head.
Sounds Natural on BBC Radio 4 Extra: A kind of Desert Island Animal Noises
By Antonia Quirke - 07 June 14:30

After Tweet of the Day, which is mainly about birds tweeting, comes Sounds Natural (26 May, 11am), which is mainly about natural sounds. BBC Radio 4 Extra pulled out an interview from 1972 with the Hammer Film actor Peter Cushing, who died in 1994 but wou

A still from Up the Women.
My love of Jessica Hynes in Up the Women was almost enough to make me join Twitter
By Rachel Cooke - 07 June 12:34

Up the Women is adorable. Admittedly, it starts slowly, but the second episode is funny. Properly funny. And clever, too.

Leader: In praise of Shameless
By New Statesman - 06 June 15:56

So, farewell then, Frank Gallagher, the foul-mouthed but eloquent poet of Manchester’s fictional Chatsworth Estate. After nine years, 11 series and 139 episodes, the Channel 4 comedy-drama series Shameless drew to a close on 28 May.

Matt Smith: the rise and fall of the hipster Doctor
By Tom Phillips - 03 June 10:54

A young Doctor with old man's eyes, he whirligigged around the screen like a spider playing Twister against itself. But Matt Smith’s legacy suffers from the fact that something went awry in the writing of the last series of Doctor Who.

The BBC lacks the ambition to go the whole way
By David Herman - 01 June 10:41

BBC2's Iraq War reviewed.

All white on the night
By David Herman - 30 May 16:54

What do Doctor Who, Sherlock and the team captains of Have I Got News for You have in common with the ITV FA Cup Final panel, all the presenters on Newsnight and the commentators on Test Match Special? They are all white.

Newton Faulkner and Gary Kemp in the studio with Christian O'Connell (centre) in
The Christian O’Connell Breakfast Show on Absolute Radio: Absolutely fatuous
By Antonia Quirke - 30 May 13:46

What happened to the drinks sideboard as a item of furniture; the mighty Katherine Jenkins possibly looking less attractive without her make-up; what appears to be a Wickes-sponsored section on power tools - just some of the unbelievably boring conversati

Town on BBC2: Welcome to the bay to nowhere
By Rachel Cooke - 29 May 8:55

Oh, our poor towns. What on earth have they done to deserve all this attention?

David Threlfall in Shameless.
Goodbye to Shameless. What does it leave behind?
By David Herman - 28 May 16:50

As the long-running television comedy comes to a close, David Herman wonders what its legacy will be. Will David Threlfall best be remembered as the feckless, drunken Frank Gallagher?

Paddy Considine and Olivia Colman in The Suspicions of Mr Whicher.
The Suspicions of Mr Whicher on ITV: Muddiness and the telly will never be wholly friends
By Rachel Cooke - 28 May 13:46

Kate Summerscale's book is very good indeed, but the drama only half-worked, the truth being complicated, elusive and, ultimately, a little prosaic.

Jan Morris.
Jan Morris's Travels Round My House on Radio 3: Unbotheredly contemplating death
By Antonia Quirke - 28 May 13:26

Anthony Sattin went through scrapbooks and photo albums picking things out for comment. There hung over the whole interview the discomfiting threat that any mention of gender reassignment would be considered not just prurient and vulgar, but (worse) borin

Ross and Rachel in Friends.
Get the TV kisses right and everybody wins
By Bim Adewunmi - 23 May 12:49

From <em>Friends</em> to <em>Cheers</em> to <em>Buffy the Vampire Slayer</em>, not all television couples have to ruin the show.

Sofie Gråbøl as Sarah Lund in the Killing, brought by Richard Klein to BBC4.
What’s the point of BBC4?
By David Herman - 15 May 17:26

When the channel started in 2002, it was branded as “a place to think”. Later is became a pantomime horse, part Jonathan Miller, part Top Gear. What happened?

New Statesman
Action movies, bilingual tunes and the exorcism of a family of six: channel hopping in Cameroon
By Bim Adewunmi - 09 May 17:08

After a cosy night watching Dutch reality TV, daily viewing in western Africa retains all the entertainment and human drama - but the stakes are very different indeed.

Hayley Atwell in Life of Crime.
Reviewed: Life of Crime
By Rachel Cooke - 08 May 13:04

Force of nature.

New Statesman
Reviewed: Tweet of the Day on Radio 4
By Antonia Quirke - 08 May 12:56

Morning has spoken.

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