Poland's Kamil Majchrzak serves against US player Noah Rubin at Wimbledon 2014. Photo: Getty
Ballet on Centre Court: how modern tennis fuses strength and grace
By Ed Smith - 12 June 10:00

Tennis has not become ugly. It has got more beautiful. Professionalisation did not ruin its balletic strand; it deepened it. The ultimate athletes turned out to be lighter, leaner and more mobile.

The 1982 Brazil World Cup side in action against Argentina. Photo: Getty
Why football loves beautiful losers
By Oliver Farry - 11 June 14:19

Sport’s love affair with the myth of thwarted victory.

England captain Charlotte Edwards poses with the Women's Ashes trophy in Australia in February. Photo: Getty
Why is the media still erasing women’s achievement in sport?
By Carrie Dunn - 10 June 15:15

Within sport, women athletes are finally gaining the professional recognition they deserve. Yet the media continues to assume that “the England team” is shorthand for “the men’s team”.  

Monster's ball: part of a float satirising Fifa for the Mainz Carnival in Germany, 3 March. Photo: Getty
Why Fifa is football’s dirtiest player
By Jon Holmes - 06 June 11:00

Last month’s rush to exonerate the Premier League’s CEO, Richard Scudamore, who had been accused of sexism, was just another example of the game’s eagerness to sweep dirty linen under the carpet.

FA chairman Greg Dyke poses with the executive's controversial report on the future of the England national team, which has angered Football League clubs. Photo: Getty Images
Football League clubs are in open revolt against the B team plans of the executives who represent them
By Martin Cloake - 06 June 10:53

The continued endorsement of Premier League B teams being given access to Football League competitions has led to an open rebellion by teams and their owners against the executives who are supposed to represent their interests.

People wave the Portuguese flag during a protest against government's austerity policies in 2012. Photo: Getty
Why I’ll be cheering for Portugal, not Brazil, in the World Cup
By Oliver Farry - 04 June 15:08

Brazil tends to eclipse the very land whose colonial undertakings shaped it and gave birth to it – Portugal.

Going to the dogs: down to the wire at Wimbledon
By India Bourke - 29 May 11:18

Wimbledon Stadium is the last of the 33 dog-racing tracks in London. Now that the owners want to sell, the institution that is the English Greyhound Derby may be about to  leave the capital for good.

Calling urbane, European managers such as André Villas-Boas "the gaffer" verges on surreal. Photo: Getty
Back to mine: why we still talk about footballers in the language of the pit
By Ed Smith - 29 May 10:00

They may earn millions and drive Maseratis but today’s footballers are still described using old working-class terminology. It’s the last link with the game’s roots. 

Football stand. Photo: Getty
Punk football: how the rise of fan ownership could save the sport
By Martin Cloake - 28 May 10:58

A new book charting and questioning the rise of football's supporter governance movement predicts a bright future for fan ownership of football clubs.

Richard Scudamore addressing the press at The London Nautical School on October 23, 2013 in London. Photo: Getty Images
Scudamore's sexist emails reveal the Premier League to be an unaccountable institution
By Martin Cloake - 23 May 13:39

If asking why there is one rule for the person who runs the richest league in the world and can control access to its key figures and another for the chief executive of a fans’ organisation counts as grinding an axe, we’re in deep trouble.

American Samoa footballers Nicky Salapu and Jaiyah Saelua with their coach Thomas Rongen. Photo: Getty
Next Goal Wins: a football film with a vital message about overcoming transphobia in sport
By Eleanor Margolis - 20 May 10:15

A new documentary about the American Samoa football team (who hold the world record for the biggest international defeat – 31-0 to Australia in 2001) gives hope that professional sport won’t always be prejudiced against those who are different.

Footballers on a Brazilian beach.
Golazo! by Andreas Campomar and Futebol Nation by David Goldblatt: the football myth behind Brazil's World Cup
By Jonathan Wilson - 15 May 16:00

The Brazilians have won five World Cups, more than anybody else. So why was there rioting last summer when teams arrived for a warm-up? Brazil's relationship with football has never been an easy romance.

Wayne Rooney. Photo: Getty
It’s hard to remember a time when Rooney hasn’t been injured
By Hunter Davies - 15 May 11:47

I hardly slept for weeks during the run-up to the last two World Cups, terrified he wouldn’t make it.

Personal bubble: professional society isolates us by career. Photo: Getty
It’s good to stray from your professional bubble – you might learn something surprising
By Ed Smith - 15 May 10:00

In three recent meetings with people who work in entirely different fields, I felt instantly at home, even though the territory was often unfamiliar to me.

FA chairman Greg Dyke launches the latest report on grassroots football on 8 May at Wembley. Photo: Getty Images
The FA’s report proves that money and power are the fundamental problem with English football
By Martin Cloake - 09 May 15:57

The FA has ignored the concerns of fans and lower league clubs in favour of the interests of the wealthiest soccer interest – once again showing it’s mostly concerned about serving the already-powerful. 

White Hart Lane is going to close for refurbishment. Photo: Getty
The season after next, Spurs will go a-wandering
By Hunter Davies - 07 May 12:06

Where will the fans park then?

Chelsea fans at Stamford Bridge for the second leg of the quarter final against Paris Saint-Germain, 8 April. Photo: Getty
David Baddiel: I can’t win when even a bain-marie gag lands me in hot water on Twitter
By David Baddiel - 30 April 10:00

The novelist and comedian on anti-Semitism in football, a night out in Pocklington and plans for his 50th.

Usual fare: queues at a pie and mash shop at Upton Park. Photo: Getty
The tasteful food van made me ponder – have football fans gone soft?
By Hunter Davies - 30 April 10:00

Once Wigan scored, though, it was a different story: the affable familes were suddenly full of hate and fury.

David Moyes during a League Cup match with Sunderland. Photo: Getty
David Moyes, Manchester United, and the nightmare dream job
By Phil Hartup - 22 April 16:40

Of all the managers who have been sacked this season in the premier league, David Moyes can have perhaps the fewest complaints.

Seeing red: a plane towing a banner flies over Old Trafford. The former Man United manager was sacked on 22 April. Photo: Getty
“Wrong One – Moyes Out” read the plane’s banner
By Hunter Davies - 22 April 10:59

Football fans have always had a keen sense of the ridiculous. 

Shell skills: a Costa Rican chef cracks eggs for an omelette. Photo: Getty
The trick in life is knowing when to care and when to be careless
By Ed Smith - 17 April 10:00

When I’m making poached eggs, I crack the shells cautiously but this makes me more likely to mess up.

If you're a woman who wants to run a bit, a red setter is an essential accessory. Photo: Getty
How to run (if you're a woman)
By Flora Cramp - 16 April 12:08

According to Runner's World, a woman needs some pink trainers and a dog if she is to stay safe while jogging.

David Beckham. Photo: Getty
The Fan: what happened to David Beckham's silly voice?
By Hunter Davies - 08 April 11:21

For years, his teammates and the whole world mocked his silly, high-pitched voice, suggesting he was a bit simple, making endless jokes about his stupidity. Now, he sounds clear and low and serious.

The statue of Bill Shankly outside Anfield stadium. Photo: Getty
How the Liverpool Supporters’ Union proved it’s possible to change football for the better
By Martin Cloake - 07 April 15:08

The work of the Liverpool Supporters’ Union, known as Spirit of Shankly, is a much-needed good news story in modern football.

Buckingham Palace footmen bring out half-time oranges at the palace’s first football match, October 2013. (Photo: Getty)
The Fan: now Jermain Defoe has left Spurs, can we stop calling him a loyal servant?
By Hunter Davies - 20 March 10:00

When top bankers retire, no one ever says they’ve been great servants to HSBC, but in football romantic notions of service linger on.

Spurs merchandise on sale outside White Hart Lane. Photo by Jamie McDonald/Getty Images.
“We are the Yids”: should Spurs fans be prosecuted for using the Y word?
By Martin Cloake - 12 March 11:20

The case against three Tottenham Hotspur fans accused of “a racially aggravated public order offence” undermines the battle against bigotry. Now that the prosecution has been discontinued, the threat to freedom of speech has been resisted – for now.

Blinking like a pit pony: it can be hard to reacclimatise to the British gloom after a spell in the sun
The Fan: the pointlessness of “warm-weather training”
By Hunter Davies - 06 March 10:00

Does sending the boys out to Dubai to kick balls around really achieve anything?

Cardiff City's owner, Malaysian businessman Vincent Tan. Photo: Getty
Are football’s authorities finally going to have to concede on supporter-owned clubs?
By Martin Cloake - 05 March 17:05

A report from a cross-party group of MPs could provide the much-needed impetus to clear away the mess around club ownership structures.

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