If the world was ending, who cared? We were all going out with a bang
By Lauren Booth - 15 October 13:00

At the Labour Party conference in Brighton, British Airways cancelled its planned "Casino" bash on the grounds that, as one Lloyds banker put it, "gambling with lives and profits may not be the right image for this year".

Paul Routledge
By Paul Routledge - 08 October 13:00

David Blunkett's position as leader of the opposition (to Gordon Brown) was officially confirmed at the launch of his book, Politics and Progress, a volume best described as a modest offering immodestly offered.

The PM is a distant relative of mine, you bastards. Let me into first class now!
By Lauren Booth - 08 October 13:00

Last week, my antipathy towards the "Do you know who I am (related to)?" attitude was sorely tested by the prospect of a nine-hour flight on Kenya Airways.

How the events in New York came to Trinidad
By Darcus Howe - 08 October 13:00

Nothing had prepared me for the state of Caribbean New Yorkers after 11 September. I had been visiting Trinidad for a conference and, at that same time, thousands were trying to return after the Labor Day celebrations in Brooklyn.

There would be little to lament if the whole ITV Digital adventure was scrubbed out as a failure
By Robert Peston - 08 October 13:00

Is ITV Digital, the former ONdigital, a national treasure? You would think it must be a cultural jewel, for all the agonising about its future from within Whitehall. The government has just a few weeks to decide whether to get involved in a rescue of the "digital terrestrial platform".

I now skilfully pee, clean my teeth and read the paper, all at the same time
By Lauren Booth - 01 October 13:00

Multi-tasking should carry a health warning. This obsession with efficiency, so crucial to industrialists and entrepreneurs alike, has turned me into a tyrant. I first discovered multi-tasking in the features pages of glossy magazines.

Until the cooks rule, Trinidad will not be a paradise
By Darcus Howe - 01 October 13:00

I arrived here in Port of Spain, Trinidad, a week ago to attend the centennial anniversary of C L R James. I spoke, in a rather abstract and intellectual way, on James and popular journalism at a conference where the slogan was "Every Cook Can Govern".

Paul Routledge
By Paul Routledge - 01 October 13:00

The sex life of the Blairs receives little media attention, less for reasons of taste than for fear of the lawyers and Alastair Campbell. But that deficiency is to be remedied in Linda McDougall's hour-long television special on Cherie Booth, due to be broadcast on 30 September.

The New Statesman Profile: Tom Clancy
By Jason Cowley - 24 September 13:00

Jason Cowley profiles Tom Clancy, the most popular novelist on earth, whose images of catastrophe animate the modern American psyche.

"There are no liberals in Britain," said the American colonel, greatly relieved
By Lauren Booth - 24 September 13:00

The terror in New York has ignited a war of words in homes, pubs and studios across the UK. Two days after the attack, Radio 5's late-night panel was rejigged to include a genuine British ex-colonel and, as an afterthought, Michael Dobbs, the writer and one-time vice-chairman of the Tory party.

Why I still support the war veterans in Zimbabwe
By Darcus Howe - 24 September 13:00

The Zimbabwean anti-colonial movement was the most advanced that ever fought on African soil, and its struggle the most brutal, equal in intensity to the war fought by the Mau Mau in Kenya.

Paul Routledge
By Paul Routledge - 24 September 13:00

Of further and better interest, as the lawyers say, is the interest shown by Michael Howard in becoming chairman of the Commons security and intelligence committee.

Why is there no British equivalent of the American Dream?
By Cristina Odone - 17 September 13:00

My American friends are amazed by the bile that is being heaped upon economic migrants in this country.

Paul Routledge
By Paul Routledge - 17 September 13:00

The terror in America cast a pall over the Trades Union Congress. Delegates and media gathered by television screens in Brighton conference centre, a few weeping openly. Hardier souls watched the drama unfold in the Fiddler's Elbow.

The best way to do your shopping, I find, is semi-naked and coated in coconut oil
By Lauren Booth - 17 September 13:00

Have you bartered for anything lately, or have you given it up in the face of global capitalism? I remember, as a kid in the Seventies, being taken around meat markets where my family would buy sausages, chops, school uniforms, everything. Dad always got away with murder.

Under new local laws, anything other than a dinner for two is illegal
By Lauren Booth - 10 September 13:00

Montgomeryshire is the accidental and, for the authorities, unwanted home of a veritable feast of post-hippie-alternative-community dwellers.

The police have become yet another profession we like to pillory
By Cristina Odone - 10 September 13:00

Why do the British hate the police? When PC Bluestone killed his wife and two of his four children, cries of horror and anguish went up.

In Durban, a black woman peer did the white man's dirty work
By Darcus Howe - 10 September 13:00

The anti-racism conference held in Durban, South Africa, collapsed in recrimination against Israel, against calls for an apology from Europeans for the Atlantic slave trade, against calls for reparations for one of the most horrible, barbaric, evil, vicious, corrupt moments in the history of hum

We should now auction off the rights to build superstores and hotels. At least it would stop the backhanders
By Robert Peston - 10 September 13:00

One oddity of the global economic slowdown is that many companies and individuals continue to over-indulge while others, such as Marconi, are on the brink of collapse.

The New Statesman Profile - Emilio Gabaglio
By Robert Taylor - 10 September 13:00

The cigar-smoking Italian who has tried to unite the workers of Europe. Emilio Gabaglio profiled

Journalists would be less inflammatory if they just ran around the tunnel and shouted: "The Vikings are coming!"
By Mark Thomas - 10 September 13:00

The number of applicants for asylum in Britain - that is, those who apply rather than those who get leave to remain - represents less than 1 per cent of the world's refugee population. Yet these past few weeks, the hysteria surrounding asylum-seekers has reached new heights.

The vicar asked: "Was James trying to wind us up when he told us to enjoy pain?"
By Lauren Booth - 03 September 13:00

For five months, I have been searching for a church to go to with my daughter. But it's been 20 years since I last went regularly and everything has changed. I stopped going after one Sunday ended in tears and humiliation.

How my hips gyrated at the joyful Notting Hill Carnival
By Darcus Howe - 03 September 13:00

Last weekend was one of supreme entertainment all round. I have criticised recent Notting Hill Carnivals for the content, their artistic side, the crudity of the costuming. I had ceased going to Notting Hill on the bank holiday. But now, its very existence is under threat.

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