DNA strands from a double helix model at the Science Museum. Photo: Paul Gilham/Getty Images
Why are we so desperate to find a genetic explanation for sex offenders?
By Sarah Ditum - 13 April 12:49

The research into the so-called “nonce gene” disintegrates under any kind scrutiny at all. Why do we want to believe in it?

Sunbathers on Brighton beach. Photo: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images
Sussex police’s victim-blaming anti-rape campaign: why is it victims, not rapists, that must change their behaviour?
By Glosswitch - 09 April 12:50

Decades after the first Reclaim the Night march, we are still wondering: why is it always women who are told they have to modify their behaviour in order to stay safe?

A dispute over pizza in Indiana has lead to a discussion abotu the nature of freedom. Sort of. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Watch out for “Big Gay”: why the freedom to discriminate is a funny sort of freedom
By Eleanor Margolis - 07 April 17:03

Discrimination under the banner of “freedom” is on the rise again.

An onlooker photographs a montage of the Kama Sutra. Photo: Getty
Why I changed my mind about porn
By Sarah Ditum - 01 April 15:04

A few years ago, I argued against the idea that porn was hijacking our sexuality. Now, as a women's centre tries to ban my opponent, I wonder - are they scared that if people listen to Gail Dines, their minds might be changed too?

Bette Davis, smoking. Photo: STF/AFP/Getty Images
I only have the occasional fag and I don’t long for nicotine – it’s the society of smoking that I crave
By Suzanne Moore - 27 March 14:50

Smoking for David? It could only be Hockney. Smoker extraordinaire, and not a bad painter either.

Women urinating on the street in the small hours: the mark of a Britain in crisis, or the ultimate bonding experience?
By Eleanor Margolis - 27 March 10:09

Bond-forming though it may be, weeing in public is not ideal for women. And even Scandinavians haven't found the solution.

Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbano with Naomi Campbell in 2010. Photo: Tullio M Puglia/Getty
Dolce and Gabbana’s comments on IVF highlight how often we ignore the surrogate mother
By Glosswitch - 17 March 16:05

Amid the outrage over the fashion designers’ comments about “synthetic children”, the role of the gestational mother has yet again been completely erased. She just makes the picture too messy.

The state opening of Parliament. Photo: Getty
Maybe we don't need to move Parliament to Hull. But we do need to overhaul its alienating traditions
By Helen Lewis - 05 March 12:28

Woven into the very fabric of Westminster are assumptions about who the building – and, by extension, our democracy – is intended to serve. The lack of convenient disabled access and the shortage of ladies’ loos in the old palace are daily reminders that parliament wasn’t built with those groups in mind.

Newborn babies at a hospital in Kolkata. Photo: Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images
Why is it still controversial to say that women should make the decisions about childbirth?
By Glosswitch - 02 March 10:13

Rebecca Schiller’s All That Matters is a brief but important book.

A woman waits in the rain. Photo: Getty
Women should never have to lie about being “taken” to stop men from harassing them
By Eleanor Margolis - 12 February 15:19

Any woman who’s ever made her way home, alone, from a night out will know that feeling of dread that comes from unwelcome conversation.

Treating women in the workplace in the same way to heterosexual men is not equality. Photo: Getty
Why do we still see equality for pregnant women and mothers as “special treatment”?
By Glosswitch - 05 February 13:48

Everyone benefits from so-called “women’s work”.

An anti-abortion protest in Belfast. Photo: Getty
Have we reached the tipping point for abortion rights in Northern Ireland?
By Siobhan Fenton - 02 February 10:28

A new legal challenge to Northern Ireland’s restrictive abortion laws marks a huge success for the pro-choice movement.

Stock and share: some argue that people are driven to food banks by housing costs, not food costs. Photo: Andrew Testa/Panos
How can business reduce poverty?
By Adam Ludlow - 22 January 12:06

The Webb Trust essay prizewinner offers an answer.

Old hat: A dinner suit for hire. Photo: Flickr/faungg
Ed Smith: Black tie used to be about dressing up, now it’s a precursor to throwing up
By Ed Smith - 22 December 15:47

Black tie is still a code, of course, but not really a dress code. It is code language. It shouts to the sober world: we are on a serious bender here, so give us a wide berth.

Finding them online is one thing, but how does one “rehabilitate” a paedophile? Photo: Getty
Is a zero-tolerance approach really the best way to stop paedophiles from abusing children?
By Hussein Kesvani - 19 December 15:01

A new security branch has been created to find paedophiles lurking on the “dark web”. Yet this zero-tolerance attitude is beginning to be called into question – for people who have never acted on their desires and want help, should we be locking them up at all?

"People just dismiss me": the leading policeman challenging the War on Drugs
By Tim Wigmore - 19 December 14:28

The Chief Constable of Durham, Mike Barton, breaks the taboo on drugs.

This is the first generation to go through adolescence online. Photo: Getty
The two women teaching boys about sexting, porn and laddism
By Sophie McBain - 11 December 9:54

“You sit teenage boys in a room with two sassy New Yorkers and you talk about hardcore pornography, sexting and age of consent and what you can get away with – and they pay attention.”

Bacon, the answer to hangovers. Photo: Getty Images
Felicity Cloake: Hangover cures shouldn’t involve further suffering
By Felicity Cloake - 11 December 9:12

In the spirit of festive generosity I would like to offer a helping hand when it comes to surviving the onslaught of hot plonk. Here, food, as in so many situations, is your friend.

The Metropoliz Museum of the Other and the Elsewhere in Rome. Photo: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images
Why farting is a feminist issue
By Glosswitch - 09 December 11:28

To exhibit any kind of bodily function in public – whether it’s pissing against a wall, spitting in the street, picking and flicking earwax while one waits in a queue – is still seen as a male thing to do.

Ho, ho, ho. Not all men want beer-related gifts, you know. Photo: Pete Norton/Getty Images
Secret santa sexism: why are we so keen to reinforce gender roles for adults at Christmas?
By Glosswitch - 05 December 13:34

Some progress has been made in getting rid of toys marketed specifically at girls or boys, yet we’re still confronted with “For Him” and “For Her” in every Christmas catalogue that plops through the door.

A restaurant in central London. Photo: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images
If you want to know how socially conservative Britain still is, go to a restaurant
By Eleanor Margolis - 04 December 10:28

Lesbians have been asked not to kiss because “this is a family restaurant”, and a woman having afternoon tea at Claridge’s was told that she wasn’t allowed to breastfeed her baby. We aren’t always as liberal as we think.

PrEP time: A large red ribbon hangs in Washington to mark World Aids Day. Photo: Flickr/Tim Evanson
Why HIV prevention meds should be available on the NHS now
By Will Nutland - 01 December 13:00

Pre-exposure HIV prophylaxis (PrEP) involves giving at-risk HIV-negative people a daily dose of HIV medication. Though controversial to some, it is proving highly effective in preventing infection and activists are calling for it to be rolled out immediately.

In the UK, policing of prostitution targets sex workers far more often than punters. Photo: Christopher Churchill/Gallery Stock
Invisible subjects: the men who fuel the demand for prostitution
By Lucy Fisher - 27 November 10:00

If prostitution is the oldest profession in the world, then punting is the oldest consumer activity. Yet it remains broadly unexamined, perhaps because the questions it raises are too uncomfortable.

Miss World titleholder Megan Young. Photo: Jay Director/AFP/Getty
Would you enter your unborn daughter in a beauty pageant?
By Glosswitch - 04 November 11:15

By virtue of being female she’s already been entered into a lifelong beauty contest, one which, through the simple fact of ageing, she is ultimately destined to lose. Why not formalise it from the start?

Grim up north:  Harry Leslie Smith grew up in coal-mining Barnsley, Yorkshire. Photo: Getty
“Hunger, filth, fear and death”: remembering life before the NHS
By Harry Leslie Smith - 31 October 14:00

Harry Leslie Smith, a 91-year-old RAF veteran born into an impoverished mining family, recalls a Britain without a welfare state.

Image problem: gay or straight, we are all actors. Image by Pacifico Silano, 'Male Fantasy' series
Damian Barr: Why do so many gay men hate camp men?
By Damian Barr - 16 October 10:00

Masc only”, “Str8 acting”, “Not into camp”. Strain your thumbs swiping Grindr and you’ll see a depressing amount of this prejudice. You’d think that, having been oppressed, we’d be more enlightened.

Dog day afternoon: the Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup polo final at Cowdray Park, West Sussex. Photo: Jocelyn Bain Hogg/VII
Watching the Englishman: Kate Fox on the peculiar rituals of the privileged
By Kate Fox - 16 October 10:00

England’s upper-middle class pretend that class no longer matters. But try to infiltrate the tribe and you’ll see how strict the rules are, says anthropologist Kate Fox. 

Mother and child: Catherine Atkinson, Labour PPC for the Erewash speaks at the Labour Party Conference, 24 September. Photo: Getty
How do we get questions of care up the political agenda, when carers are too knackered to complain?
By Helen Lewis - 07 October 16:00

The toll exerted by caring – and how little a capitalist society values such a vital activity – should be one of the key issues for feminism. 

We shouldn’t fight for “gender equality”. We should fight to abolish gender
By George Gillett - 02 October 12:47

Gender is flawed – no set of social scripts will ever represent the wonderful diversity and intricacy of human behaviour. 

Job seekers.
“Innocent, gullible, and blinded by illusions”: Honoré de Balzac on the misery of interns in 1841
By Philip Maughan - 29 September 11:20

“There are two types of interns: poor ones and rich ones. The poor intern has pockets full of hope and needs a permanent position; the rich intern is unmotivated and wants for nothing.”

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