Jesús Muñoz, flat in the LA River bed, features in James Ellroy's LAPD '53. Photo: © 2015 LOS ANGELES POLICE MUSEUM
Ghettoside is a bold, humane study of Los Angeles’ black homicide epidemic
By Ryan Gattis - 21 May 11:18

Ryan Gattis reviews two books on the Los Angeles police – and finds a city plagued by a national problem.

Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper. Photo: Ben Stansall - WPA Pool /Getty Images
How Stephen Harper is using paranoia to win in 2015
By Noah Richler - 18 May 9:23

From Islam to oil sands critics, Harper is using a fear of outsiders to unite voters.

Men stare at the smoldering remains of a senior center set ablaze in Baltimore, Maryland. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty
Six Baltimore police officers have been charged over the death of Freddie Gray
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 28 April 12:44

Violence, looting, and several fires followed Freddie Gray's funeral, the 25-year-old African-American man who died after being illegally arrested.

Hillary Clinton at the world bank. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images
Can anyone stop the Clinton machine? Only time will tell
By Sasha Abramsky - 16 April 14:09

Coronations seldom proceed as planned in the drawn-out US primary season - the polish can't hold long without cracking somewhere.

John Oliver gets to the crux of why the Snowden leaks matter: mass surveillance of dick pics
By Ian Steadman - 07 April 12:59

"I guess I never thought about putting it in the context of your junk."

Trevor Noah, the South African comedian announced as the new host of the Daily Show. Photo: Justin Barlow/Gallo Images/Getty Images for MTV
Why outsiders like John Oliver and Trevor Noah are taking over American late night TV
By Esther Breger - 31 March 14:25

South African Trevor Noah, the newly-announced host of The Daily Show, joins Brits John Oliver and James Corden in the US’s coveted late-night slots.

William Hague unveiling his waxwork likeness at Madame Tussauds in 1997. Photo: Dave Gaywood/AFP/Getty Images
You find out who your friends are when you’re following William Hague and Ffion round the States
By Suzanne Moore - 06 March 9:47

“Can you tell us who he is? So we know which one to photograph?”

Darren Wilson following the shooting. Photo: St. Louis County Prosecutor's Office via Getty Images
Police officer Darren Wilson is cleared of civil rights violations in Ferguson shooting
By Stephanie Boland - 04 March 18:16

Report lays out systematic racial discrimination in Ferguson justice system but upholds Darren Wilson's version of the events preceding Michael Brown's death.

A police line armed with tazers in New York. Photo: Kena Betancur/Getty Images
The NYPD blues: From Eric Garner to broken windows, activist Josmar Trujillo says enough
By Rob Crilly - 04 March 9:08

Meet the co-founder of New Yorkers Against Bratton, who wants New York cops to clean up their act.

Civil war re-enactors at Gettysburg. Photo: John Moore/Getty Images
Laird Hunt's Neverhome: the civil war isn’t just something in America’s past
By Erica Wagner - 19 February 11:59

A novel of the American Civil War that combines realism with the powerful folklore surrounding defiant women.

Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, her sister Razan, and husband Deah Shaddy Barakat. Photo: Facebook
The Chapel Hill shooting: White male atheist murders three Muslim students
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 11 February 14:51

46-year-old Craig Stephen Hicks has been arrested and charged.

US Military Police guard detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Photo: Petty Officer 1st class Shane T. McCoy/U.S. Navy/Getty Image
An extraordinary diary from Guantanamo Bay reveals the failure of American democracy
By David Rose - 05 February 10:17

Detainee Mohamedou Ould Slahi's account of the camp is heartbreaking. But it is crucial the truth is told.

Halifax, Nova Scotia, where Rehtaeh Parsons lived and died. Photo: Brian Burke on Flickr, via Creative Commons
The UnSlut Project: Why we should have cared about Rehtaeh Parsons, and why we didn’t
By Emily Lindin - 30 January 16:15

We are horrified and disgusted by the reaction to the rape and death of Rehtaeh Parsons, but we aren’t surprised.

A protester from the Westboro Baptist Church. Photo: Kimihiro Hoshino/AFP/Getty Images
“Love is wise and hatred is foolish”: how a son of the Westboro Baptist Church lost faith
By Aoife Moriarty - 26 January 14:35

The controversial church has a firm hold on many of its members. But Nate Phelps, son of the church’s infamous patriarch, wanted out.

New York. Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images
How the "mayor" of Gramercy Park keeps New York’s most exclusive spot private
By Rob Crilly - 22 January 10:08

Arlene Harrison runs a tight ship managing Gramercy Park.

Shia LeBeouf at the premiere of Nymphomaniac. Photo: Getty
From Shia LaBeouf to Rolling Stone's frat house story, the trouble with "I Believe Her"
By Sarah Ditum - 14 December 12:55

When we talk about rape victims, “I Believe Her” is powerful because it’s simple; because it’s simple, it slides into being simplistic. Both the alleged frat house gang rape described by Rolling Stone, and Shia LeBeouf's accusations against a woman who visited his art installation, reveal its strengths and weaknesses.

Barack Obama with Chuck Hagel. Photo: Getty
The departure of a third defence secretary finally kills off Obama’s hopes of a “team of rivals”
By John Bew - 11 December 10:11

Chuck Hagel's resignation - the latest soap opera to hit the Obama adminstration - is a sign of severe dysfunction. The team of rivals has disintegrated, with many of them becoming a thorn in the president’s side as he limps on for a final two years.

A protester holds up a photo of Eric Garner during a demonstration in New York. Photo: Yana Paskova/Getty
The case of Eric Garner shows that cameras won’t stop police brutality of black people
By Matthew Pratt Guterl - 04 December 16:17

The assumption is that cameras are objective, silent witnesses that provide indisputable evidence, and also that people behave differently when they know a camera is capturing their actions. This is a fantasy.

A protestor holds her hands up in front of a police car in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty
Ferguson has reinforced racial fear and lethal stereotypes
By Peter Bloom - 26 November 11:44

As long as racial fear can be used to justify disproportionate force, killings like that of Mike Brown in Ferguson will continue.

Wendy Davis, who looks likely to lose her bid to be Texas governor. Photo: Stewart F House/Getty
The US Midterms: the races you need to watch
By Nicky Woolf - 04 November 11:39

Rarely has an election elicited a louder national cry of “meh”. But there are some important races buried beneath the banality.

Fort Kent, Maine, where nurse Kaci Hickox has become the centre of a political controversy. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty
Ebola is the latest political battleground between America’s left and right
By David Millward - 31 October 12:21

The febrile atmosphere of the mid-term elections has turned the response to the disease into a way of playing politics.

Power games: Obama addresses US troops in Kabul, May 2014. Photo: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
Altered states: Henry Kissinger’s scathing take-down of Obama
By John Bew - 30 October 9:00

Under the surface of World Order is a searing critique of the Obama administration’s foreign policy. While Obama has embraced the label of “realist”, this is not a realism that Kissinger recognises.

A woman kneels in a cloud of gas as she protests the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Getty
In America, fear is growing that the police are getting out of control
By David Millward - 15 October 15:35

Barely a week goes past without a terrible incident, and too often the police officer is white and the other people involved are black.

Statesman and street fighter: Nixon showed foresight and skill in foreign policy but repeatedly resorted to sharp practices on the domestic front. Photo: Don Carl Steffen/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
Rethinking Nixon: forty years after Watergate, can the 37th president be rehabilitated?
By John Bew - 18 September 9:09

It is now four decades since Richard Milhous Nixon resigned in disgrace as US president – he remains reappraised but not rehabilitated.

Romantic versions: an 1880 engraving depicting a US party in search of the missing Arctic explorer John Franklin and his team
What Canada – and John Franklin – can teach the UK about the independence game
By Noah Richler - 16 September 15:31

In the fortnight in which one of Franklin’s lost ships was found in the Canadian arctic, and Scotland – like Quebec before it – is voting on independence, the parallels between the UK and Canada have never been stronger. 

A military official announces Barack Obama's arrival at the Nato Summit in Newport, Wales. Photo: Getty
With his foreign policy, Barack Obama is trying to win by playing a loser’s game
By Ian Leslie - 04 September 15:54

If you’re playing a loser’s game, strategy is unnecessary. You avoid errors, but in dangerous times risk being buffeted by events.

Murder: a protester outside Buzz Westfall Justice Center where a jury began looking at the circumstances surrounding the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown. Photo: Getty
Welcome to America, where police shoot an unarmed black man six times – and then call him a villain
By Laurie Penny - 21 August 13:31

What is happening in Ferguson is about more than Michael Brown and his family. It’s a shadow play of a national crisis in race relations and class repression.

Demonstrators protest the killing of Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Getty
Amid the tear gas and arrests of reporters in Ferguson, we must not lose sight of Mike Brown
By Musa Okwonga - 14 August 14:55

The shooting of an unarmed black man by police in the small town of Ferguson, Missouri has provoked civil unrest, media fury and a debate about the community’s reaction. But riots, reporters' arrests and black anger are not the issue here – the death of Mike Brown is.

Taking the phrase “war on crime” rather too literally. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images
Michael Brown, Ferguson and the United States' police-soldiers
By Robert Macquarie - 14 August 13:21

Over the past few decades, US police departments have invested heavily in military-style equipment and training. The turmoil in Ferguson, Missouri shows the results.

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