Mad or bad? Ex-PM Tony Blair in Hong Kong, 2012. Photo: Getty
Blair’s supporters should stage a humanitarian intervention – and make him shut up about Iraq
By Mehdi Hasan - 18 June 17:02

How many Sure Start centres cancel out the depleted uranium used in Fallujah? Why does record investment in the NHS absolve the torture and abuse in Abu Ghraib?

Isis's strangely corporate approach to terror makes them all the more scary
By Sophie McBain - 18 June 15:14

From its unsettling but bureaucratic annual reports to its sophisticated social media strategy, the jihadist group Isis has been borrowing ideas from business and applying them to international terror. 

Iraqi Shiite tribesmen in the south who have volunteered to fight. Photo: Getty
What is going to happen in Iraq?
By Isaac Chotiner - 17 June 13:08

It is not the assertiveness of new entities that is driving change, but the collapse of the old national constructions.

Displaced Iraqi women arrive at a temporary camp in Aski Kalak in the north of the country. Photo: Getty
With Iraq, Obama was dealt a bad hand – and he’s playing it badly
By Jessica Schulberg - 16 June 12:57

The latest violence exposes the administration’s lack of vision for the broader Middle East.

How worried should we be about the rise of ISIS, the group “too extreme” for Al Qaeda?
By Sophie McBain - 12 June 17:12

“What I heard today scared the hell out of me”, one US senator said following the capture of Iraq's second city by the hardline jihadist group ISIS. So who are ISIS and how big a threat to they pose?

An inmate peers from behind a wall as a guard walks by in the infamous Evin jail. Photo: Getty
For the Bahá'ís imprisoned in Iran, freedom and human rights seem remote
By Nazila Ghanea - 06 June 10:09

Seven Bahá'ís – members of Iran’s largest non-Muslim religious minority, persecuted by the government for decades – have now spent six years in prison for practising their religion.

Activists have defied the ban on women driving in Saudi Arabia by getting behind the wheel. Photo: Getty
Is Saudi Arabia seeking friends?
By Burhan Al-Chalabi - 23 May 13:16

Saudi Arabia’s poor record on human rights and its treatment of women make it easy to demonise the kingdom.

Mourners gather during the funeral procession of Mahmud al-Sayed al-Dakruri on 20 May. Photo: Getty
By trying to control civil society, the Egyptian government could fuel more social unrest
By Adam Pickering - 21 May 10:27

The leaders in Egypt have repeatedly failed to recognise that the campaigning of not-for-profits plays an important role as a pressure gauge that can release dissent in a manageable way.

The mass death penalties and the wider crackdown on the opposition cannot be tolerated.
The UK must stand against Egypt's disregard of human rights
By Ian Lucas - 08 May 15:27

The mass death penalties and the wider crackdown on the opposition cannot be tolerated.

Truce for now: Fatah's Azzam al-Ahmed celebrates with Hamas's PM in the Gaza Strip Ismail Haniya in Gaza City. 23 April. Photo: Getty
Israel-Palestine: this is the anti-peace process
By Dimi Reider - 07 May 17:00

If the Israeli government was at all committed to a two-state solution, it would have welcomed the agreement between the PLO and Hamas.

No way home: Syrian refugees sleeping outside the Centre for Temporary Stay of Immigrants (CETI), in Melilla, Spain, 2 April. Photo: Getty
“My heart aches for Syria. I don’t think people think about that”
By Samira Shackle - 29 April 9:40

While 2.6 million Syrians have fled the country, few have so far come to Britain. Yet the current anti-immigration climate ignores the desperate circumstances of those forced here.

Abuse of women domestic workers in Qatar exposes uncomfortable truths closer to home
By Sophie McBain - 23 April 13:42

A new report from Amnesty International describes how domestic workers in Qatar face abuse and exploitation. The problem isn't just limited to Qatar, however: domestic workers in the UK are similarly vulnerable.

Glimmer of hope: women queue to vote in the recent Afghan elections
Leader: the lessons of the Afghanistan misadventure have not been learned
By New Statesman - 11 April 12:00

It was by accident, not by design, that the UK avoided being drawn into the sectarian vortex of Syria.

Photo: Susannah Ireland/Eyevine
Leaving Afghanistan: is it finally time to be positive about this blighted nation?
By William Dalrymple - 10 April 10:13

The Afghan presidential election has been declared a success – but as the west finalises its pull-out, what the country's prospects?

Asma Assad comforts Syrian women in a photo from the offical Instagram account
In Syria, the internet has become just another battleground
By Sophie McBain - 10 April 10:00

President Assad’s Instagram account is one of the more surreal examples of the use of social networking in the Syrian war.

Why is Egypt sentencing hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood supporters to death?
By Sophie McBain - 25 March 11:18

Several Egyptian TV channels yesterday welcomed the sentencing to death of 529 Muslim Brotherhood supporters in a flawed two-day trial. Are Egyptians sleepwalking into one of the darkest chapters in their recent political history?

A Syrian greengrocer next to a bombed out building in the Shaar district of Aleppo, February 2014. Photo: Mohammed al-Khatieb/AFP/Getty Images
Jeremy Bowen: I know there’s trouble in the Middle East when I need my flak jacket, gas mask and Kevlar pants
By Jeremy Bowen - 07 March 17:00

The BBC’s Middle East editor on John Kerry striking the wrong tone over Ukraine, and remembering the Aleppo souks.

Migrant workers at Qatar's world cup stadium. Photo: Getty.
400 Nepalese construction workers have died since Qatar won the World Cup bid
By Sophie McBain - 17 February 12:37

Why are international sporting events so dangerous for construction workers?

A bread cart amid the rubble following an airstrike in Aleppo
The war on bread: how the Syrian regime is using starvation as a weapon
By Annia Ciezadlo - 17 February 10:01

For Syrians, the war on bread began a long time ago. Long before the siege of Yarmouk, before last week’s abortive evacuation of Homs, before the war even began, the regime’s neoliberal economic “reforms” left thousands of Syrians living on nothing but bread and tea.

Negotiating a path to peace: from Geneva to Aleppo, via Moscow
By Michael C Williams - 13 February 13:24

Syrian peace talks are promising, but much will need to be agreed (and a few Gordian Knots sliced) before there can be a lasting peace.

As the US turns against new sanctions on Iran, has the Israel lobby lost its mojo?
By Mehdi Hasan - 10 February 9:09

The Aipac lobby group is famed for its ability to move bills, spike nominations and keep legislators in line – but is its influence waning?

Why the US should apologise for deaths in Iraq
By Burhan Al-Chalabi - 06 February 8:32

A US apology will not bring back the thousands of dead Iraqis, but at least it will amount to an acceptance of moral responsibility.

At Geneva this week, the government should push for the establishment of a Syria
Peace will not be achieved in Syria without Iran
By Douglas Alexander and Jim Murphy - 21 January 19:21

At Geneva this week, the government should push for the establishment of a Syria Contact Group involving both Saudi Arabia and Iran.

New Statesman
Syria: evidence of "systematic killing" of 11,000 detainees
By Sophie McBain - 21 January 14:03

Top lawyers say they have evidence that the Syrian government is responsible for crimes against humanity, but will these latest findings influence tomorrow's peace talks?

Three reasons Egyptians should vote “no” in today's referendum
By Sophie McBain - 15 January 11:59

Egyptians are expected to vote “yes” in a referendum on their new constitution. This will prove a big mistake.

New Statesman
Did the World Health Organisation contribute to Syria's polio outbreak?
By Sophie McBain - 02 January 13:10

WHO's response to Syria's polio outbreak, and its close relationship with the Syrian government, have been called into question.

Whatever happened to the revolution in Egypt?
By Bel Trew - 01 January 8:58

The military leadership is trying to extinguish protest from both Muslim Brotherhood supporters and the liberals who helped overthrow President Mubarak. Will they succeed?

Syrians cannot afford for next year to be like this year
By Jim Murphy MP - 28 December 14:33

Violence, hunger and disease have become facts of life for millions. More can be done to alleviate their suffering, and more must be done.

New Statesman
Britain should “hang its head in shame” over Syrian refugee crisis
By Sophie McBain - 13 December 12:31

Amnesty International condemns Europe's failure to resettle Syrian refugees.

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