Miranda July.
Miranda July’s new app Somebody delivers text messages in person
By Philip Maughan - 29 August 12:42

“Every relationship becomes a three-way,” July says of the new app, which launched yesterday at the Venice Film Festival.

An Apple iPad with Twitter's native app. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
Twitter's taking away your control over what tweets you choose to see
By Ian Steadman - 20 August 12:38

A subtle change in how Twitter's feed works will make some people very angry, but most people probably won't even notice.

Care about feminist issues all the time, not just when someone is being abused on Twitter. Image: Keoni Cabral on Flickr via Creative Commons
But What Can Be Done: Dos and Don’ts To Combat Online Sexism
By Leigh Alexander - 19 August 12:26

Here’s a helpful guide to what you should and shouldn’t do if you see a woman being harassed on Twitter.

Some slices are bigger than others. Photo: jzawdubya/Flickr/CC BY-SA
Geotagging reveals Wikipedia is not quite so equal after all
By Mark Graham - 18 August 17:28

It may be open to the world, but the articles on Wikipedia reflect existing hierarchies of knowledge.

We’ve won, lesbians. We’ve penetrated the realm of emojis
By Eleanor Margolis - 15 August 14:26

Snark aside, queer women should never be invisible.

Are we being naive about our data? Photo: Getty
Should we be getting a share of the money our personal data earns?
By Emma Woollacott - 08 August 13:08

Facebook collects and sells our data – and yet we seem to care comparatively little that we don’t get a cut.

More than 70 per cent of MPs use Twitter.
To watch the political elite debate, head to Twitter, not Westminster
By Lucy Fisher - 06 August 15:55

Twitter, once the preserve of teens and techies, is now the medium of choice for the political establishment too. 

A smartphone running Facebook. Photo: Johan Larsson / Flickr / CC BY 2.0
Sex workers on Facebook are not a sexualised peep show available at all hours
By Margaret Corvid - 05 August 9:25

The default assumption when it comes to sex workers on Facebook is that their lives are an open book.

All-seeing: new legislation could entrench and extend the ablility of the state to monitor us. Image: Herbert Bayer/Private Collection/Christie's Images/Bridgeman Images
The deep state: data surveillance is about power, not safety
By Anthony Barnett - 17 July 11:15

All three of Britain’s main parties insist that data surveillance is for our protection – but this “emergency” is about power and control.

Medaupload founder Kim Dotcom, who has compared his arrest and prosecution for facilitating filesharing as similar to the civil rights struggle. Photo: Getty Images
“Fifteen years of utter bollocks”: how a generation’s freeloading has starved creativity
By Chris Ruen - 16 July 12:14

Arguments for digital piracy are drivel – it's high time we steered away from this cultural cliff, argues author Chris Ruen.

Facebook’s “like” symbol. Image: Getty
Laurie Penny on Facebook's manipulation: It can manipulate your mood. It can affect whether you vote. When do we start to worry?
By Laurie Penny - 30 June 12:23

The social network admits manipulating its users’ emotions through the content it put in their newsfeeds. Think that’s creepy? A couple of years ago, it influenced their voting patterns, too. When do we get scared about what Facebook could do with its power?

Four tips David Cameron can learn from world leaders on how to use Twitter
By Sophie McBain - 26 June 12:24

What tips can David Cameron learn from the annual Twiplomacy report, which studies how world leaders use Twitter? He needs a little help – not only because he's regularly insulted online, but because Barack Obama won't follow him back. 

Malware is coming for you. Photograph: Drew Coffman on Flickr via Creative Commons
Would you compromise your computer for one cent an hour? This study says you might
By Andrew Smith - 23 June 11:25

It is apparently very easy to trick ordinary computer users into hosting your malware.

Biz Stone: rose-tinted visions of a techie future. Photo: Bloomberg
Biz Stone: the Californian who flew the Twitter nest
By Josh Spero - 19 June 10:00

Biz Stone clearly left some libertarian coding in Twitter’s DNA. Following Edward Snowden’s revelations about the NSA, Twitter could proudly say that it had not co-operated. 

Viral hit: we all suffer from an inbuilt psychological bug, exacerbated by the internet. Photo: Marcelo Graciolli on Flickr, via Creative Commons
Omniscience bias: how the internet makes us think we already know everything
By Ian Leslie - 17 June 15:25

The internet is an answer machine, it doesn’t help us ask better questions. It feeds the illusion that we already know everything we need to know to be well-informed.

Low's caricature of Keynes for the New Statesman, 1933
Paul Mason: what would Keynes do?
By Paul Mason - 12 June 10:00

The revolution in IT and how it is transforming our world in ways that even economists are struggling to understand.

In Turkey, Erdoğan's attempt to block Twitter lasted barely two weeks. Photo: Getty
Social media has been privatised. Why do we treat it as a public space?
By Jillian C York - 11 June 12:15

Social media companies like Twitter and Facebook have essentially erected new borders where such borders did not exist before.

US Secret Service seeks Twitter sarcasm detector
By Sophie McBain - 05 June 12:55

The US Secret Service is seeking some help with its online snooping, and needs a company that can detect sarcasm online - because you need to be able to distinguish between "I love Al Qaeda" and "I love Al Qaeda". Good luck with that, pals! 

The Facebook “like” symbol. Photo: Getty
Facebook could decide an election without anyone ever finding out
By Jonathan Zittrain - 03 June 11:35

The scary future of digital gerrymandering – and how to prevent it.

Dan Brown. Really? Photo: Getty
Could you go out with a Dan Brown fan?
By Eleanor Margolis - 15 May 11:49

 How online dating has turned singles into perfectionists.

The City Toastmaster using a megaphone at the 1908 London Olympics. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images
How capital letters became internet code for shouting
By Alice Robb - 17 April 16:04

And why we should lay off the caps-lock key.

The cultural riches online are seemingly infinite - will they be there forever? Photogragh: Erik Söderström on Flickr via Creative Commons
What’s the rush? Why the internet means we never get round to doing anything
By Oliver Farry - 17 April 12:53

Speed is of the essence in the online world but faced with the Aladdin’s cave of cultural riches, one’s response is invariably one of sluggishness, of planning for a putative future that will never come.

South Australian outback. There is very poor network coverage in much of the country. Photo: Getty
Australia’s grand vision for a national broadband network has shrunk
By Mary Hamilton - 10 April 16:27

Big coastal cities do not always get good coverage, let alone the outback.

Helpful as they are, there is a limit to what can be achieved politically with your mobile phone. Photo: Getty
Leader: Twitter politics is no substitute for ideas and strong campaigns
By New Statesman - 04 April 14:51

There is good reason to suspect that much of the energy spent on online campaigning is wasted entrenching divisions or preaching aggressively to an already zealous choir.

Living a life online: kids glued to their smartphones. Photo: Getty
How can we end cyberbullying?
By Rhiannon and Holly - 04 April 10:23

Let's start by ditching the word "cyber bullying" - this isn't a new phenomenon, but it is harder for parents and teachers to deal with than harassment and abuse than occurs offline.

San Jose in Silicon Valley. Photo: Getty
The brutal ageism of tech: meet Silicon Valley’s obsolete workforce
By Noam Scheiber - 24 March 12:34

In the one corner of the American economy defined by its relentless optimism, there is now a large and growing class of highly trained, objectively talented, surpassingly ambitious workers who are shunted to the margins.

Baidu's suggested search feature is very revealing.
What Baidu’s search autofill reveals about the soul of the average Chinese web surfer
By Christopher Beam - 14 March 12:54

“What do I do if I'm ugly?”, and other questions.

Electronic terminals are taking over the casino floors in Las Vegas. Photo: Getty
Addiction as art: How gambling machines – and the digital world – put us in “the machine zone”
By Ian Leslie - 06 March 9:44

A quiet revolution has taken place in gambling, with electronic terminals finely-tuned into the perfect devices for parting you from your money. Rather than thrilling you, they lull you into a calm, machine-like state that gives the illusion of control.

A smiley face in the sky. Photo: Getty
Your emoticon addiction may actually make people like you more
By Alice Robb - 20 February 14:45

Emoticons are a new and evolving form of language, and they are producing new patterns of brain activity.

Social media and the second Hillsborough inquest
By David Banks - 14 February 12:30

The depth of feeling that exists about the disaster and what came after is entirely understandable. The attorney general has a difficult task ahead deciding what consititutes contempt of court in this unique circumstance.

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