An arms sales ban would cost us nothing
By Staff blogger - 14 June 13:00

A few days ago, the Foreign Office - and let us at least give it credit for increased transparency - issued its annual report on arms control. It reveals that licences were granted for £992m-worth of arms exports in 2003.

A very good monarch
By Robert Chesshyre - 14 June 13:00

Observations on Ronald Reagan

John Pilger denounces the liberal press (yes, NStoo)
By John Pilger - 14 June 13:00

In its D-Day issue, the Observer presented Blair with pat-a-cake questions. His inane replies were n

World view - Lindsey Hilsum wants Europe to help the Middle East
By Lindsey Hilsum - 14 June 13:00

The Americans claim to want to nurture reform in the Arab world, yet they ban the tiny Gulf state of

Deaf to the world beyond them
By Andrew Simms - 07 June 13:00

Andrew Simms dissects the pitiful record of G8, a summit of the industrialised countries that specia

Pleased to bow to Uncle Sam
By Neil Clark - 07 June 13:00

D-Day for British politics - The UK Independence Party wants freedom from Europe only in order to tu

Saddam's very own party
By Nick Cohen - 07 June 13:00

D-Day for British politics - Respect, the alliance between the Muslim Association of Britain and the

The president wiggles his hips in Detroit
By Alec Russell - 31 May 13:00

''Dubbya, Dubbya, Dubbya." It was 8.30pm at a stadium on the edge of Detroit, and on the giant central podium an increasingly pink-cheeked Candice Miller, a Republican congresswoman, was doing her best to warm up the crowd. It was not easy going.

The rape of the wilderness
By Tristram Hunt - 31 May 13:00

If Europe venerated old cathedrals and Roman ruins, America's great monuments were its mountains and

That was the vote. Now for the real election
By George Monbiot - 31 May 13:00

In India, the world's largest democracy, democracy has been prohibited. The owners of property have

How to cut obesity
By Staff blogger - 31 May 13:00

We live, it is said, in a "nanny state" that constantly tries to regulate our lifestyles. This is almost the exact opposite of the truth. A nanny's first duty is to have a care for her charges' bodily health, ensuring good diet and frequent exercise.

On the political agenda
By James Crabtree - 31 May 13:00

Technology policy in an election year? Don't hold your breath. And anyway, President Bush is no techno-phile. His most coherent thought on the network society came during the 2000 race.

The pro-war camp is struck dumb
By Andrew Stephen - 24 May 13:00

Washington is at fever pitch over the torture revelations. Yet beyond the Beltway, many Americans ma

What Brown would do in No 10
By John Kampfner - 24 May 13:00

We know about his economic policies. But where does the Chancellor stand on wars, Israel, schools, a

Can judges restore America's honour?
By Nick Cohen - 24 May 13:00

In the next few weeks, the US Supreme Court will decide if the Guantanamo Bay prisoners should be br

After the bombs, a broom handle is nothing
By Staff blogger - 10 May 13:00

And so it has come to this. Just over a year ago, President George W Bush, in his premature announcement of victory, stated that "there are no longer torture chambers or rape rooms or mass graves" in Iraq.

America's barbecue vote
By Becky Tinsley - 10 May 13:00

They work longer hours than Dad did, regret not having wives who stay at home, and hate seeing those

America - Andrew Stephen fears it's too little, too late for Kerry
By Andrew Stephen - 10 May 13:00

Kerry has run a woeful campaign so far, failing to counter even when unfairly attacked. After the wo

America - Andrew Stephen dissects Bush's U-turn on the UN
By Andrew Stephen - 03 May 13:00

George Bush now regards the UN's help in Iraq as vital. But this isn't a real conversion: he wants t

Politics - John Kampfner sees Blair's foreign policy collapse
By John Kampfner - 26 April 13:00

To make the case for Europe, the Prime Minister will have to show foresight and zeal, commodities th

On Europe, vote, vote and vote again
By Staff blogger - 26 April 13:00

The European Union has always been an elite project. This was so from its earliest postwar beginnings, when the rule of cool, rational technocrats seemed infinitely preferable to the hot-blooded mass movements led by Hitler and Mussolini.

We don't trust them an inch
By Kieron O'Hara - 26 April 13:00

Across the democratic world, governing elites are mistrusted, whatever their policies. Blair's decis

The men of war
By Barbara Smith - 26 April 13:00

Barbara Smith judges that the chances for Arab-Israeli peace are as bleak as they have ever been. Ye

Appeasement: Should we strike a deal?
By John Gray - 26 April 13:00

When Spain announced it would pull its troops out of Iraq, it was accused of rewarding terrorism. Bu

Lindsey Hilsum - Each Iraqi is both pro- and anti-war
By Lindsey Hilsum - 19 April 13:00

The pro- and anti-war camps, polarised and strident in the US and Britain, are contained inside the

As the death toll rises, a region holds its breath
By Barbara Smith - 19 April 13:00

Iraq - Jordan fears a backlash against its support of America; Syria worries about economic sanction

Axis to grind
By Michael Lind - 19 April 13:00

The President of Good and Evil: taking George W Bush seriously

Peter Singer <em>Granta Books, 256p

Second-class allies
By John Kampfner - 19 April 13:00

In the ten countries that will soon accede, support for the EU has now given way to disillusion - no

World view - Michela Wrong notes the failings of diplomats
By Michela Wrong - 12 April 13:00

Diplomats have the same faults as foreign correspondents: they don't get out enough, they socialise

Diary - Marcelle d'Argy Smith
By Marcelle d'Argy - 12 April 13:00

I love the way the English who are anti-Europe say, "I've nothing against the French. I'm off there

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