New Statesman
How Iran is coming in from the cold
By David Patrikarakos - 17 October 15:25

Israel calls Hassan Rowhani a “wolf in sheep’s clothing” – but is the new president of the Islamic Republic the west’s best hope of détente?

Cameron must speak up over Sri Lanka's human rights abuses
By Kerry McCarthy - 10 October 11:56

Ahead of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting, the PM must show leadership and prevent the regime from presenting an airbrushed image to the world.

Are the Austrian FPÖ party really neo-Nazis?
By Liam McLaughlin - 09 October 9:14

At an FPÖ rally, I mix with those who are both for and vehemently against the controversial party. FPÖ are compared to Nazis, one man says, because the FPÖ is an identity cult which exists only through the leader: “Strache is the FPÖ”.

New Statesman
Meet Matthew Lee, the scourge of the United Nations
By Martin Plaut - 08 October 10:34

Unrecognised by the public, lone journalist Matthew Lee's work in trying to hold the UN to account has made him someone few diplomats can afford to ignore.

New Statesman
Qatar wades into the Sudanese revolt
By Martin Plaut - 04 October 10:51

The government of Qatar is well known for its forays into foreign policy, and is accused by the United Nations Monitoring Group on Somalia of buying the votes in last year's Somali election. Now it has turned its attention to Sudan.

New Statesman
Why Israel is dangerously out of touch with Iran
By Yo Zushi - 03 October 13:18

The fact is that it is now Israel, not Iran, that is making barely veiled threats of military aggression. But diplomacy needs a certain amount of trust on both sides to work.

New Statesman
Sudan: Last days of the Bashir regime?
By Martin Plaut - 30 September 10:07

Week-long protests following an increase in fuel prices mean that the situation is critical for President al-Bashir.

New Statesman
The woman behind Wikileaks: "I am not speaking with Julian"
By Linda Kinstler - 26 September 17:26

Birgitta Jónsdóttir talks about what Wikileaks biopic The Fifth Estate got wrong.

New Statesman
What happens when a piece of feminist artwork is turned into anti-Islamic propaganda?
By Holly Baxter - 25 September 13:56

Canadian artist Rosea Lake has seen her artwork appropriated by a far-right political group in Belgium and used to oppose 'Islamification'.

New Statesman
A quirk of Australian Prime Ministers
By Stephen Brasher - 19 September 13:40
All but one of Australia’s first 20 prime ministers have federal electoral divisions named after them. The first, Edmund Barton, a prime mover in federation, resigned after three years to become a high court judge.
 
Even in an age of “realists” and vigilantes, there is still cause for optimism
By John Pilger - 19 September 10:31

It's not too late for the world to learn the lesson of the US's foreign policy mistakes.

New Statesman
The unshakeable Angela Merkel, the pilot who weathered the storm
By Andrew Gimson - 19 September 8:07

As she faces re-election, the signs are that Angela Merkel’s commitment to the euro stretches only so far as the maths continue to work for Germany. Andrew Gimson on the roots of a genial but ruthlessly pragmatic politician.

New Statesman
The most common word used to describe immigrants is 'illegal'
By Ayesha Saran - 18 September 15:49

64 per cent of British people consider it to be more of a problem than an opportunity, according to the Transatlantic Trends survey. But there is cause for optimism.

New Statesman
The march that made Gandhi the Mahatma
By Martin Plaut - 17 September 13:33

One hundred years ago, Gandhi launched the decisive 1913 campaign that was to transform him into a figure of international stature. Later this year, we commemorate it.

New Statesman
How would Hezbollah respond to air strikes in Syria?
By Matthew Levitt - 17 September 9:35

While the US continues to deliberate their course of action, so, too, does Hezbollah. After depending upon the Syrian regime for so long, how will they retaliate in the event of air strikes?

New Statesman
We can’t script the outcomes of war
By Emile Simpson - 17 September 9:32

In seeking to break with a past tainted by Iraq, the Syria vote entrenches the legacy of that war. So what next?

New Statesman
A view on Syria from the US: Obama's enemies scent blood
By Nicholas Wapshott - 17 September 9:27

How did Obama find himself in such a rococo mess, pinned between haters in the House and his KGB rival?

New Statesman
“Something must be done about Syria,” the hawks cry. Well, try diplomacy
By Mehdi Hasan - 12 September 14:11

Remember this – 99 per cent of the 100,000-plus dead Syrians were killed by bombs and bullets, not by sarin or VX gas.

New Statesman
Brazil's protests have subsided - for now
By Claire Rigby - 12 September 10:35

The nationwide protests of the summer have mostly petered out, but Brazil's police and government still have a lot to answer for.

New Statesman
Are we entering a new age of British isolationism?
By John Bew - 12 September 8:44

Britain has shown that its notion of how to conduct world affairs turns on strong but unrealistic opinions fuelled by moral outrage. Let’s leave serious nations to get on with defending the world, shall we?

New Statesman
The divided town of Deir Ezzour is a microcosm of Syria’s bitter conflict
By Donatella Rovera - 12 September 7:49

As the threat of military intervention continues to loom over Syria, in a far-flung corner of the country, the town of Deir Ezzour offers an insight into the suffering of ordinary Syrians.

Obama's bizarre TV address: the President dithers over Syria
By Nicky Woolf - 11 September 10:47

Obama could not be clearer: something needs to be done about Assad. But he is ducking every opportunity to act.

Rebel fighters fire from a tank captured from the Syrian army
Syria: There's no need to be logical or consistent
By Michael Kinsley - 10 September 15:28

Michael Kinsley is a Syria hypocrite. You should be, too.

The new ‘progressive’ conservatism is a threat to the centre-left
By Patrick Diamond - 08 September 9:49

Across Europe, the dramatic shift of political strategy is still poorly understood by progressives.

After Egypt and Syria, there's never been a worse time to host an arms fair
By David Wearing - 07 September 13:58

Next week London hosts the world’s largest arms fair, the "Defence Security Equipment International" (DSEi) exhibition, organised with the help of the British government and part-subsidised by the UK taxpayer.

New Statesman
In the Frame: Split
By Tom Humberstone - 06 September 13:42

Tom Humberstone's observational comic for the New Statesman.

Lebanon’s tipping point: how the Syrian crisis is punishing the generosity of its neighbours
By Rushanara Ali - 05 September 10:49

Syrian refugees could soon account for 30% of Lebanon's population. Its people fear it will fall back into yet another conflict.

Five myths about Putin’s foes
By Ben Judah - 04 September 16:44

They're not leaderless, they're not all middle class and they don't want a revolution.

Leader: This should not be the start of a new age of British isolationism
By New Statesman - 04 September 15:30

In refusing to grant a majority for early military action, MPs were rejecting not interventionism per se but a particular – and unwise – intervention.

Barack Obama on Syria: full text of his speech
By Barack Obama - 01 September 9:29

"This would not be an open-ended intervention. We would not put boots on the ground," says the US president, announcing he will take a decision on action to Congress.

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