Syrians cannot afford for next year to be like this year
By Jim Murphy MP - 28 December 14:33

Violence, hunger and disease have become facts of life for millions. More can be done to alleviate their suffering, and more must be done.

The Intelligence and Security Committee: the government’s white-washing body of choice
By Clare Algar - 19 December 14:02

The ISC has completely missed the major scandals of the past decade: this “oversight” committee only hears about the activity of those it oversees via the newspapers.

Today Ukraine, tomorrow central Europe: why the west needs to wake up to Putin’s ambitions
By Nick Tyrone - 16 December 17:05

The Russian president is trying to rebuild the Soviet empire and in doing so offering an alternative to liberal democracy.

Photo by Renata Neder/Amnesty International
The New Statesman Christmas campaign 2013: Help keep Laísa Santos Sampaio safe
By Naomi Westland - 06 December 8:27

Laísa is one of the most high-profile critics of illegal logging and charcoal burning in her region of Brazil, but receives little or no protection from the authorities.

Violence against women doesn’t happen in a vacuum
By Gavin Shuker - 25 November 17:40

The government's predilection for prioritising effect over cause has consequences - we must focus on prevention as well as cure.

Why is China such fertile ground for young, ambitious Brits?
By Lu-Hai Liang - 20 November 17:01

Young British people are choosing to emigrate to China, armed with strategies for chasing success. Why?

New Statesman
Why jokes are wearing thin in Egypt
By Sophie McBain - 14 November 13:54

Are Egypt’s most mischievous scribblers and joke-makers now retiring?

Where were you when JFK was shot?
By Bonnie Greer - 12 November 16:09

Bonnie Greer remembers how “Mom and Apple Pie America” came to an end with the assassination of John F Kennedy fifty years ago.

New Statesman
Romania’s anti-corruption agency keeps taking down politicians – but the people keep bringing them back
By Vlad Odobescu - 11 November 15:52

How do you extract political capital from your corruption investigations?

Leader: Sri Lanka is a rogue state
By New Statesman - 11 November 11:49

Something terrible happened in the final months of the Sri Lankan civil war in 2009, an ethnic war that had divided the country for 26 years.

Occupy Wall Street protesters picket during a May Day rally
Who are the new socialist wunderkinds of America?
By Max Strasser - 09 November 9:52

Every time I’ve come home to the US from my home abroad over the past four years, I notice a trend among people of my demographic: they have become increasingly politicised – and increasingly radical.

The UK and Russia: how to end the paralysis
By Natalie Cox - 07 November 15:24

Rather than approaching our relationship with Russia from a humanitarian or social perspective, we should move past this web of irritants and seek a deeper arrangement.

New Statesman
Why the threat of genocide hangs over the Central African Republic
By Martin Plaut - 04 November 11:23

The Central African Republic (CAR) – a byword for human rights abuses for decades – is slipping towards a bloodbath.

New Statesman
Why another high profile rape case in India will fail to tackle the causes of sexual violence
By Samira Shackle - 31 October 13:34

“The trial in the Mumbai gang-rape case has opened to a drowsy and ill-attended courtroom, without the crush of reporters who documented every twist in a similar case in New Delhi in which a woman died after being gang-raped on a private bus.”

Alec Baldwin: Americans have been lied to
By Alec Baldwin - 31 October 11:26

Edward Snowden saw things he thought we, as Americans, should know. He valued the truth and thought you could handle it, says Alec Baldwin.

Do we need an African NATO?
By Richard Darlington - 29 October 15:23

Paul Collier's argument that the continent needs a common standing military force that can be deployed against rebellions is a persuasive one.

Who is Ted Cruz and how did he nearly crash the US government?
By Nicky Woolf - 21 October 11:07

Ted Cruz, a first-term senator from Texas, took the US government to the brink of disaster. He has paid a high price in credibility, but he wasn't always a punchline.

Three days in a US hospital convinced me that America needs ObamaCare
By Eleanor Margolis - 17 October 16:41

The bare-faced callousness of the American healthcare system is obvious. This isn’t a hospital; it’s the Wild West.

New Statesman
Has the sun set on Golden Dawn?
By Yiannis Baboulias - 17 October 15:31

Whatever the crackdown against Golden Dawn means for Greece, the hope is now rekindled that the EU might be starting to see the rise of the far right as the threat that it is.

New Statesman
The choices in the Middle East are not between good and bad, but between bad and worse
By Uri Dromi - 17 October 15:25

A nuclear Iran will destabilise the Middle East and maybe push Saudi Arabia and other Sunni countries into a nuclear arms race. Oil supplies might be threatened. Yet Israel, though always capable of defending itself, shouldn’t be taking a seat in the firs

New Statesman
How Iran is coming in from the cold
By David Patrikarakos - 17 October 15:25

Israel calls Hassan Rowhani a “wolf in sheep’s clothing” – but is the new president of the Islamic Republic the west’s best hope of détente?

Cameron must speak up over Sri Lanka's human rights abuses
By Kerry McCarthy - 10 October 11:56

Ahead of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting, the PM must show leadership and prevent the regime from presenting an airbrushed image to the world.

Are the Austrian FPÖ party really neo-Nazis?
By Liam McLaughlin - 09 October 9:14

At an FPÖ rally, I mix with those who are both for and vehemently against the controversial party. FPÖ are compared to Nazis, one man says, because the FPÖ is an identity cult which exists only through the leader: “Strache is the FPÖ”.

New Statesman
Meet Matthew Lee, the scourge of the United Nations
By Martin Plaut - 08 October 10:34

Unrecognised by the public, lone journalist Matthew Lee's work in trying to hold the UN to account has made him someone few diplomats can afford to ignore.

New Statesman
Qatar wades into the Sudanese revolt
By Martin Plaut - 04 October 10:51

The government of Qatar is well known for its forays into foreign policy, and is accused by the United Nations Monitoring Group on Somalia of buying the votes in last year's Somali election. Now it has turned its attention to Sudan.

New Statesman
Why Israel is dangerously out of touch with Iran
By Yo Zushi - 03 October 13:18

The fact is that it is now Israel, not Iran, that is making barely veiled threats of military aggression. But diplomacy needs a certain amount of trust on both sides to work.

New Statesman
Sudan: Last days of the Bashir regime?
By Martin Plaut - 30 September 10:07

Week-long protests following an increase in fuel prices mean that the situation is critical for President al-Bashir.

New Statesman
The woman behind Wikileaks: "I am not speaking with Julian"
By Linda Kinstler - 26 September 17:26

Birgitta Jónsdóttir talks about what Wikileaks biopic The Fifth Estate got wrong.

New Statesman
What happens when a piece of feminist artwork is turned into anti-Islamic propaganda?
By Holly Baxter - 25 September 13:56

Canadian artist Rosea Lake has seen her artwork appropriated by a far-right political group in Belgium and used to oppose 'Islamification'.

New Statesman
A quirk of Australian Prime Ministers
By Stephen Brasher - 19 September 13:40
All but one of Australia’s first 20 prime ministers have federal electoral divisions named after them. The first, Edmund Barton, a prime mover in federation, resigned after three years to become a high court judge.
 

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