New Statesman
“Something must be done about Syria,” the hawks cry. Well, try diplomacy
By Mehdi Hasan - 12 September 14:11

Remember this – 99 per cent of the 100,000-plus dead Syrians were killed by bombs and bullets, not by sarin or VX gas.

New Statesman
Brazil's protests have subsided - for now
By Claire Rigby - 12 September 10:35

The nationwide protests of the summer have mostly petered out, but Brazil's police and government still have a lot to answer for.

New Statesman
Are we entering a new age of British isolationism?
By John Bew - 12 September 8:44

Britain has shown that its notion of how to conduct world affairs turns on strong but unrealistic opinions fuelled by moral outrage. Let’s leave serious nations to get on with defending the world, shall we?

New Statesman
The divided town of Deir Ezzour is a microcosm of Syria’s bitter conflict
By Donatella Rovera - 12 September 7:49

As the threat of military intervention continues to loom over Syria, in a far-flung corner of the country, the town of Deir Ezzour offers an insight into the suffering of ordinary Syrians.

Obama's bizarre TV address: the President dithers over Syria
By Nicky Woolf - 11 September 10:47

Obama could not be clearer: something needs to be done about Assad. But he is ducking every opportunity to act.

Rebel fighters fire from a tank captured from the Syrian army
Syria: There's no need to be logical or consistent
By Michael Kinsley - 10 September 15:28

Michael Kinsley is a Syria hypocrite. You should be, too.

The new ‘progressive’ conservatism is a threat to the centre-left
By Patrick Diamond - 08 September 9:49

Across Europe, the dramatic shift of political strategy is still poorly understood by progressives.

After Egypt and Syria, there's never been a worse time to host an arms fair
By David Wearing - 07 September 13:58

Next week London hosts the world’s largest arms fair, the "Defence Security Equipment International" (DSEi) exhibition, organised with the help of the British government and part-subsidised by the UK taxpayer.

New Statesman
In the Frame: Split
By Tom Humberstone - 06 September 13:42

Tom Humberstone's observational comic for the New Statesman.

Lebanon’s tipping point: how the Syrian crisis is punishing the generosity of its neighbours
By Rushanara Ali - 05 September 10:49

Syrian refugees could soon account for 30% of Lebanon's population. Its people fear it will fall back into yet another conflict.

Five myths about Putin’s foes
By Ben Judah - 04 September 16:44

They're not leaderless, they're not all middle class and they don't want a revolution.

Leader: This should not be the start of a new age of British isolationism
By New Statesman - 04 September 15:30

In refusing to grant a majority for early military action, MPs were rejecting not interventionism per se but a particular – and unwise – intervention.

Barack Obama on Syria: full text of his speech
By Barack Obama - 01 September 9:29

"This would not be an open-ended intervention. We would not put boots on the ground," says the US president, announcing he will take a decision on action to Congress.

War in Syria: Barack Obama has run out of friends
By Nicky Woolf - 01 September 8:52

In passing the decision on Syria strikes on to Congress, the President has decided it's better to look like a coward than a hypocrite.

Ed Miliband: Britain's future lies in "hard-headed multilateralism"
By Helen Lewis - 31 August 9:44

Labour leader argues that next week's G20 meeting in Russia is the time to advance the cause of peace in Syria.

The ugly truth behind Obama's Syria plan
By Nicky Woolf - 29 August 11:44

Targeted strikes to punish Assad will only perpetuate the conflict – and that's exactly what the American government wants.

A Syrian opposition fighter holds a rocket propelled grenade
Syria: the case for and against intervention
By Mike Gapes and John Baron - 28 August 17:02

Labour MP Mike Gapes and Conservative MP John Baron put both sides of the argument.

Intervention in Syria must be aimed at toppling Assad - or there's no point
By Nick Tyrone - 28 August 16:39

Token engagement would be equally damaging to both the west and to Syria. We should consider the costs of leaving the regime in the place.

Leader: Syria: the case not proven
By New Statesman - 28 August 15:26

There is nothing dishonourable in choosing between a bad outcome and a worse one. The risk remains that by intervening we will both widen and intensify the conflict.

Martin Luther King waves to supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial
Martin Luther King and the African-American fight for justice
By Bonnie Greer - 28 August 9:10

From fairly early on, the Civil Rights Movement, in many instances, was a carefully managed affair. Bonnie Greer examines the role of the black middle class in the Civil Rights Movement and the March on Washington.

What ever happened to Martin Luther King's dream?
By Gary Younge - 27 August 9:57

The horrors of segregation bound the US civil rights movement together. Fifty years on from Martin Luther King’s great speech, inequality persists – but in subtler ways.

What Chelsea Manning can expect in a US prison
By Jane Fae - 22 August 17:30

The soldier formerly known as Bradley Manning has announced that from now on she will living as a woman. What will life be like for a trans woman inside the US prison system?

Should Arab countries pay reparations for the slave trade too?
By Martin Plaut - 21 August 14:31

Fourteen countries of the Caribbean are seeking reparations from three European nations for the slave trade. While the British responsibility for the Trans-Atlantic trade rightly remains high on the agenda, perhaps there are other countries which should b

Germany - the EU’s 'exceptional nation' - sees no need for change
By Michael Hessel - 19 August 14:08

The country's voters show little desire to proactively seek a resolution to the euro crisis.

Egypt in crisis: "The body is evidence of the massacre, how can I put it in the ground?"
By Bel Trew - 16 August 12:22

Bel Trew goes inside the Cairo morgue where the bodies of Morsi supporters, massacred by the army, are waiting to be buried.

A statue of Nelson Mandela.
The less we remember about Nelson Mandela, the more we love him
By Will Self - 08 August 10:00

Will Self's "Madness of Crowds" column.

The courage of Bradley Manning will inspire others to seize their moment of truth
By John Pilger - 08 August 8:26

In 2010, Private Manning did his duty to humanity and supplied proof from within the murder machine. This is his triumph, and his show trial merely expresses corrupt power’s abiding fear of people learning the truth.

David Miliband: The decade of disorder
By David Miliband - 07 August 15:30

As he prepares to leave for his new life in America, the former foreign secretary explains why the financial crisis has not created an upsurge of support for the centre left – and why defensive opposition is not enough.

An Eritrean demonstrator waves his national flag during a demonstration
Britain leaves its Eritrean community at the mercy of government extortion
By Martin Plaut - 05 August 11:29

The Eritean community in the UK faces a relentless campaign to pay taxes both to the Eritrean government and to its armed forces on income they earn in Britain.

A view of Canton (Guangzhou) after an aerial attack in the war
China and Japan: the struggle for supremacy in the East China Sea
By Rana Mitter - 04 August 9:59

History and politics are coming together in a potentially toxic fashion in the East China Sea as China, motivated by memories of Japanese wartime atrocities, agitates for dominance in the region.

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