Citizens in Simferopol, Ukraine watch Putin on a laptop declaring Crimea part of Russia. (Photo: Getty)
Vlad the impatient: why timid western politics won’t wash with Putin
By Julian Evans - 20 March 10:00

The world waits to see how far the fire that has been lit by Russia’s invasion of Crimea will spread in Ukraine and elsewhere.

A symbolic change.
Eurosceptics will do well in May, but the federalists will retain their grip
By Richard Mylles - 18 March 9:51

The parliamentary alliance between the the centre-right and the centre-left means the increase in the number of eurosceptic MEPs will have a largely symbolic effect.

Authority increasingly lies with elites.
As we mourn Benn, the rise of unelected power should shame us
By Richard Morris - 14 March 17:07

In the Ukraine, the Middle East and the eurozone, authority increasingly lies with elites, rather than elected representatives.

We are committed to making the EU work better for Britain.
How Labour will work for real change in Europe
By Douglas Alexander - 14 March 16:12

We need to boost Europe’s competitiveness, avoid a race to the bottom on skills and wages and ensure EU migrants contribute to our economy and our society.

Moscow liberals are discovering that the ground has shifted beneath their feet since Putin came back to power in 2012. Photo: Getty
While the west watches Crimea, Putin is cracking down in Moscow
By Julia Ioffe - 14 March 12:06

There’s suddenly not much left of the independent media in Russia, even of what little of it there was left after Putin’s first two terms at the wheel.

Homecoming queen: Miss Iowa 2011 takes part in an Independence Day parade in her home state. (Photo: Danny Wilcox Frazier/Redux/Eyevine)
How American pageants are turning politics into a beauty parade
By Nicky Woolf - 13 March 10:00

In the US, beauty pageants are an increasingly popular way for young women to begin a career in public office.

Activists keep riot police at bay standing on makeshift barricades on the Maidan, Kyiv, in January. Photo: Espen Rasmussen/Panon
Ukraine: Rebirth of a nation
By Julian Evans - 11 March 9:21

Bullied and humiliated by Russia, seen as a strategic buffer by the US, Ukraine is riven by corruption and deeply divided. Can it rise and free itself?

A placard reading “A mother by choice” at a pro-choice protest in Spain. Photo: Getty
Laurie Penny on Spain’s war on abortion: it's not about morality – it’s about austerity
By Laurie Penny - 08 March 17:43

Attacking women’s rights isn’t just a diversion tactic. It’s a bid for votes from cultural conservatives.

We mustn’t forget the revolutionary roots of International Women’s Day
By Rebecca Winson - 08 March 10:00

Now marked with Google doodles and special shopping displays, in the early 20th century, International Women's Day was a fierce, worldwide campaign for worker's rights.

A surprising degree of consensus.
The main parties agree on the EU far more than they suggest
By Pawel Swidlicki - 07 March 14:47

Beyond the bluster and rhetoric, there is a surprising degree of consensus on the reforms needed.

Vladimir Putin by André Carrilho for the New Statesman
Leader: Why we need to be honest about Vladimir Putin
By New Statesman - 06 March 13:36

Whatever the Kremlin apologists say – and regardless of the ancient historical and cultural affinities involved – there are few benefits for citizens of Crimea likely to result from their de facto annexation by Russia.

Art regeneration: Viktor Hulik's 1997 street-level statue of "Cumil the Peeper" in Bratislava
Slovakia: life after the velvet divorce
By Angus Roxburgh - 06 March 10:00

Why the former Czechoslovakian state, which gained its “Velvet Divorce” from the Czech Republic in 1993, is one of Europe’s quiet successes.

Rocks and Molotovs vs snipers’ bullets in Kiev
By Andrew Wilson - 06 March 10:00

Ukraine's revolution has been an old-style uprising cut through with violence.

Energy security must be pursued with far greater speed.
How the west can match Putin's grand strategy
By Marcus Roberts - 05 March 14:34

Ukrainian and Georgian NATO membership should be fast-tracked and energy security pursued with far greater vigour and speed.

A camel rider passes in front of a fenced mangrove plantation along Eritrea's arid Red Sea coast. Photo: Getty
Meet the three Eritrean women who are taking on the regime
By Martin Plaut - 03 March 13:19

Feruz Werede, Selam Kidane and Meron Estefanos are finding ways of challenging one of the most repressive states in Africa.

A unit claiming to be Cossack and other citizen pro-Russian volunteers outside a Ukrainian miltary base in the Crimea. Photo: Getty
Why Vladimir Putin needs a poor, aggressive Russia
By KermlinRussia - 03 March 12:03

If you can’t improve people’s living standards, you can try to give them a sense of belonging to a great power.

The Foreign Secretary says this "is an entirely different situation".
Hague denies Iraq war has undermined western stance over Ukraine
By George Eaton - 03 March 9:00

The Foreign Secretary says Ukraine "is an entirely different situation" after John Kerry criticises Russia for "invading another country on completely trumped up pretext".

It’s no again to all things Euro: the rise of the new Eurosceptics
By Mark Leonard - 28 February 8:08

There are three groups Nigel Farage and Ukip must win over: the settlers, the prospectors and the pioneers. Can he do it?

The EU cannot afford a wait and see approach.
The western Balkans are in danger of sliding backwards
By David Clark - 24 February 10:50

The EU cannot afford a wait and see approach that creates the risk of economic divergence and renewed instability.

Yulia Tymoshenko in 2009. Photo: Getty
Ukrainian opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko released from prison
By New Statesman - 22 February 16:08

Ukrainian MPs have voted to oust President Yanukovych and hold early presidential elections on 25 May.

Why the US should apologise for deaths in Iraq
By Burhan Al-Chalabi - 06 February 8:32

A US apology will not bring back the thousands of dead Iraqis, but at least it will amount to an acceptance of moral responsibility.

Ending the Palestine-Israel impasse: two state or common state?
By Peter Hain - 30 January 11:54

"Could a common state solution more easily resolve the deadlock than the two-state solution I and many others have long-favoured?"

Peter Hain: one-state solution to Israeli-Palestinian conflict must be considered
By George Eaton - 30 January 11:54

The Labour MP and former cabinet minister says a one-state solution could "more easily resolve the deadlock than the two-state solution I and many others have long favoured".

Dieudonné’s war on France: the Holocaust comedian who isn’t funny
By Andrew Hussey - 30 January 11:30

Dieudonné is no Bernard Manning or Frankie Boyle, whose humour is purposelessly offensive. In recent years, he has set out on a political mission to provoke the French state and test the limits of French law.

In “Mitt”, Mitt Romney is both alien and somehow also beautifully, terribly human
By Nicky Woolf - 29 January 16:46

A new film following Mitt Romney from his failed first presidential bid in 2007-8 to his doomed candidacy in 2012 may not be political dynamite, but it is an oddly compelling portrait of a very awkward man.

South Africa’s emerging new left: the birth of a new socialist party
By Martin Plaut - 27 January 12:09

The aim is to create a movement similar to the United Democratic Front that fought the apartheid government.

In Egypt, a nation voted Yes to military rule and Yes to moving forwards
By Bel Trew - 27 January 10:31

The plebiscite amounts to a tacit endorsement for the military-installed government that has launched a crackdown on Morsi and his Islamist party, the Muslim Brotherhood.

Before the First World War: what can 1914 tell us about 2014?
By Richard J Evans - 23 January 9:58

Old world decline, rogue empires, killing for God – looking at 1914, we can discover that there are many uncomfortable parallels with our own time.

New Statesman
The parrot who registered as a local candidate in Belarus, and other political animals
By Sophie McBain - 22 January 12:26

Yasha the parrot joins an elite menagerie of animals that have entered politics.

At Geneva this week, the government should push for the establishment of a Syria
Peace will not be achieved in Syria without Iran
By Douglas Alexander and Jim Murphy - 21 January 19:21

At Geneva this week, the government should push for the establishment of a Syria Contact Group involving both Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Pages