The Foreign Secretary says this "is an entirely different situation".
Hague denies Iraq war has undermined western stance over Ukraine
By George Eaton - 03 March 9:00

The Foreign Secretary says Ukraine "is an entirely different situation" after John Kerry criticises Russia for "invading another country on completely trumped up pretext".

It’s no again to all things Euro: the rise of the new Eurosceptics
By Mark Leonard - 28 February 8:08

There are three groups Nigel Farage and Ukip must win over: the settlers, the prospectors and the pioneers. Can he do it?

The EU cannot afford a wait and see approach.
The western Balkans are in danger of sliding backwards
By David Clark - 24 February 10:50

The EU cannot afford a wait and see approach that creates the risk of economic divergence and renewed instability.

Yulia Tymoshenko in 2009. Photo: Getty
Ukrainian opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko released from prison
By New Statesman - 22 February 16:08

Ukrainian MPs have voted to oust President Yanukovych and hold early presidential elections on 25 May.

Why the US should apologise for deaths in Iraq
By Burhan Al-Chalabi - 06 February 8:32

A US apology will not bring back the thousands of dead Iraqis, but at least it will amount to an acceptance of moral responsibility.

Ending the Palestine-Israel impasse: two state or common state?
By Peter Hain - 30 January 11:54

"Could a common state solution more easily resolve the deadlock than the two-state solution I and many others have long-favoured?"

Peter Hain: one-state solution to Israeli-Palestinian conflict must be considered
By George Eaton - 30 January 11:54

The Labour MP and former cabinet minister says a one-state solution could "more easily resolve the deadlock than the two-state solution I and many others have long favoured".

Dieudonné’s war on France: the Holocaust comedian who isn’t funny
By Andrew Hussey - 30 January 11:30

Dieudonné is no Bernard Manning or Frankie Boyle, whose humour is purposelessly offensive. In recent years, he has set out on a political mission to provoke the French state and test the limits of French law.

In “Mitt”, Mitt Romney is both alien and somehow also beautifully, terribly human
By Nicky Woolf - 29 January 16:46

A new film following Mitt Romney from his failed first presidential bid in 2007-8 to his doomed candidacy in 2012 may not be political dynamite, but it is an oddly compelling portrait of a very awkward man.

South Africa’s emerging new left: the birth of a new socialist party
By Martin Plaut - 27 January 12:09

The aim is to create a movement similar to the United Democratic Front that fought the apartheid government.

In Egypt, a nation voted Yes to military rule and Yes to moving forwards
By Bel Trew - 27 January 10:31

The plebiscite amounts to a tacit endorsement for the military-installed government that has launched a crackdown on Morsi and his Islamist party, the Muslim Brotherhood.

Before the First World War: what can 1914 tell us about 2014?
By Richard J Evans - 23 January 9:58

Old world decline, rogue empires, killing for God – looking at 1914, we can discover that there are many uncomfortable parallels with our own time.

New Statesman
The parrot who registered as a local candidate in Belarus, and other political animals
By Sophie McBain - 22 January 12:26

Yasha the parrot joins an elite menagerie of animals that have entered politics.

At Geneva this week, the government should push for the establishment of a Syria
Peace will not be achieved in Syria without Iran
By Douglas Alexander and Jim Murphy - 21 January 19:21

At Geneva this week, the government should push for the establishment of a Syria Contact Group involving both Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Would you feel differently about Snowden, Greenwald, and Assange if you knew what they really thought?
By Sean Wilentz - 20 January 11:06

High-profile leakers have largely set the terms in the debate over transparency and privacy. But do they deserve the prestige and influence that has been accorded to them?

Why, in 2014, are first ladies still expected to behave like 1950s housewives?
By Rhiannon and Holly - 16 January 8:54

Open your mouth and identify yourself as a human being while daring to be married to a high-powered politician, and the media is unlikely to look kindly upon you.

Hollande and the French kiss goodbye to era of private presidential affairs
By John Gaffney - 15 January 10:27

When things are going well, the “private life” is deliberately on display for all to see. That is how the French presidency thrives.

Why the bridge scandal is so damaging to Chris Christie's presidential hopes
By Alec MacGillis - 09 January 16:25

The New Jersey governor is widely tipped as a potential Republican nominee for the 2016 election. But as a recent scandal involving gridlock on a bridge shows, he's more like Richard Nixon than than Rudi Giuliani.

Why the Tories have more in common with the Romanians than they think
By Nicholas Hillman - 08 January 16:52

It's a sweet irony that Margaret Thatcher is the heroine both of some of those who wish to come here and many of those who oppose their doing so.

How Europe's far-right will - and won't - flourish in 2014
By Matthew Goodwin - 02 January 13:17

While the more established parties, such as the Front National and the Sweden Democrats, look set to enjoy the next year, others are likely to remain firmly on the fringe.

Syrians cannot afford for next year to be like this year
By Jim Murphy MP - 28 December 14:33

Violence, hunger and disease have become facts of life for millions. More can be done to alleviate their suffering, and more must be done.

The Intelligence and Security Committee: the government’s white-washing body of choice
By Clare Algar - 19 December 14:02

The ISC has completely missed the major scandals of the past decade: this “oversight” committee only hears about the activity of those it oversees via the newspapers.

Today Ukraine, tomorrow central Europe: why the west needs to wake up to Putin’s ambitions
By Nick Tyrone - 16 December 17:05

The Russian president is trying to rebuild the Soviet empire and in doing so offering an alternative to liberal democracy.

Photo by Renata Neder/Amnesty International
The New Statesman Christmas campaign 2013: Help keep Laísa Santos Sampaio safe
By Naomi Westland - 06 December 8:27

Laísa is one of the most high-profile critics of illegal logging and charcoal burning in her region of Brazil, but receives little or no protection from the authorities.

Violence against women doesn’t happen in a vacuum
By Gavin Shuker - 25 November 17:40

The government's predilection for prioritising effect over cause has consequences - we must focus on prevention as well as cure.

Why is China such fertile ground for young, ambitious Brits?
By Lu-Hai Liang - 20 November 17:01

Young British people are choosing to emigrate to China, armed with strategies for chasing success. Why?

New Statesman
Why jokes are wearing thin in Egypt
By Sophie McBain - 14 November 13:54

Are Egypt’s most mischievous scribblers and joke-makers now retiring?

Where were you when JFK was shot?
By Bonnie Greer - 12 November 16:09

Bonnie Greer remembers how “Mom and Apple Pie America” came to an end with the assassination of John F Kennedy fifty years ago.

New Statesman
Romania’s anti-corruption agency keeps taking down politicians – but the people keep bringing them back
By Vlad Odobescu - 11 November 15:52

How do you extract political capital from your corruption investigations?

Leader: Sri Lanka is a rogue state
By New Statesman - 11 November 11:49

Something terrible happened in the final months of the Sri Lankan civil war in 2009, an ethnic war that had divided the country for 26 years.

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