A pro-Russian activist holds an icon in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk, 9 April. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, the protesters wait for Russia to take charge
By David Patrikarakos - 17 April 10:00

Standing in front of the barricades, two pensioners held up a banner with “For ever with Russia” emblazoned across it. The sentiment was uniform and unambiguous.

Glimmer of hope: women queue to vote in the recent Afghan elections
Leader: the lessons of the Afghanistan misadventure have not been learned
By New Statesman - 11 April 12:00

It was by accident, not by design, that the UK avoided being drawn into the sectarian vortex of Syria.

Photo: Susannah Ireland/Eyevine
Leaving Afghanistan: is it finally time to be positive about this blighted nation?
By William Dalrymple - 10 April 10:13

The Afghan presidential election has been declared a success – but as the west finalises its pull-out, what the country's prospects?

Asma Assad comforts Syrian women in a photo from the offical Instagram account
In Syria, the internet has become just another battleground
By Sophie McBain - 10 April 10:00

President Assad’s Instagram account is one of the more surreal examples of the use of social networking in the Syrian war.

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
Why is Europe failing to protect its Roma population from hate crimes?
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 April 17:31

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

Pro-Russian activists guard a barricade at the Ukrainian regional Security Service building in Donetsk. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, protestors are chanting “New Russia” – an old term that’s back in fashion
By Linda Kinstler - 08 April 9:22

Separatists in Donetsk and elsewhere are harking back to the 18th century territory of Novorossiya, as Moscow seems to be making moves to federalise Ukraine.

The party should start talking about responsible capitalism in a global context.
Labour needs to turn up the volume on international development
By Richard Darlington - 07 April 16:31

Why is Labour not yet talking about responsible capitalism in a global context?

The facts of killing: how do we write about the Rwandan Genocide?
By Giles Foden - 07 April 8:48

Twenty years on, we still struggle to comprehend the trauma.

Erdogan addresses a crowd of supporters from the balcony of the AKP Party HQ in Ankara, 31 March. (Photo: Getty)
Turkey: Erdogan’s dirty war of attrition
By Alev Scott - 03 April 14:53

As Turkey goes to the polls, the televised speeches from rallies are far from polite.

Wendy Davis during her 13-hour filibuster of an anti-abortion bill in the Texas state senate. Photo: Getty
Can Wendy Davis become the first Democratic governor of Texas in 20 years?
By Nicky Woolf - 03 April 14:48

Wendy Davis shot to fame in 2012 after her 13-hour filibuster to stop a particularly vicious anti-abortion bill. But can she convert that kind of recognition into victory in the race to be governor of Texas?

Franz Alekseyevich Roubaud's panoramic painting The Siege of Sevastopol (1854-55) shows the Charge of the Light Brigade. (Image: Bridgeman Art Library)
Defend the west: is it time to re-arm?
By Brendan Simms - 03 April 11:00

Europe should not underestimate the Russian threat, argues historian and professor of international relations Brendan Simms. We must show how seriously we take Putin’s assault on Ukraine by working towards unification and moral and military rearmament.

Anne Hidalgo's victory in Paris was a small consolation for the French left. Photograph: Getty.
French Socialists humiliated in local elections
By Raphael Gray - 31 March 14:41

Good news for Ukip, bad news for Labour.

Statues in the ruins of Angkor Wat, photographed in 1952. Photo by Baron/Getty Images
Finding Pol Pot’s lost love
By Peter Fröberg Idling - 28 March 13:21

For most of his thirties, Cambodia's brutal dictator worked as a French teacher in Phnom Penh and his students adored him.

Tony Leon (r) shakes hands with Kgalema Motlanthe, then deputy leader of the ruling ANC, 2008. (Photo: Getty)
Tony Leon on South Africa: “Days after Mandela’s burial, the unity of the ANC was shattered”
By Tony Leon - 27 March 10:00

The former leader of South Africa’s Democratic Alliance talks about the fallout from Madiba’s death on the rainbow nation.

Russia's revenge: why the west will never understand the Kremlin
By Angus Roxburgh - 27 March 10:00

The events in Ukraine are Putin’s payback for what he considers to be a quarter-century of humiliation since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
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John Kerry speaks about the situation in Crimea during a town hall meeting with university students at the State Department in Washington on 18 March. Photo: Getty
For our most powerful and hypocritical leaders, crimes are those that others commit
By Mehdi Hasan - 21 March 9:01

There is egregious hypocrisy and unctuous sanctimony at the heart of western foreign policy.

Destitute: a Syrian refugee family from Aleppo in a shelter in Istanbul. (Photo: Getty)
Three years since war began in Syria, ordinary people remain the real victims
By Sophie McBain - 20 March 10:00

If there was a time when military action could have protected civilian lives, it has long passed.

Citizens in Simferopol, Ukraine watch Putin on a laptop declaring Crimea part of Russia. (Photo: Getty)
Vlad the impatient: why timid western politics won’t wash with Putin
By Julian Evans - 20 March 10:00

The world waits to see how far the fire that has been lit by Russia’s invasion of Crimea will spread in Ukraine and elsewhere.

A symbolic change.
Eurosceptics will do well in May, but the federalists will retain their grip
By Richard Mylles - 18 March 9:51

The parliamentary alliance between the the centre-right and the centre-left means the increase in the number of eurosceptic MEPs will have a largely symbolic effect.

Authority increasingly lies with elites.
As we mourn Benn, the rise of unelected power should shame us
By Richard Morris - 14 March 17:07

In the Ukraine, the Middle East and the eurozone, authority increasingly lies with elites, rather than elected representatives.

We are committed to making the EU work better for Britain.
How Labour will work for real change in Europe
By Douglas Alexander - 14 March 16:12

We need to boost Europe’s competitiveness, avoid a race to the bottom on skills and wages and ensure EU migrants contribute to our economy and our society.

Moscow liberals are discovering that the ground has shifted beneath their feet since Putin came back to power in 2012. Photo: Getty
While the west watches Crimea, Putin is cracking down in Moscow
By Julia Ioffe - 14 March 12:06

There’s suddenly not much left of the independent media in Russia, even of what little of it there was left after Putin’s first two terms at the wheel.

Homecoming queen: Miss Iowa 2011 takes part in an Independence Day parade in her home state. (Photo: Danny Wilcox Frazier/Redux/Eyevine)
How American pageants are turning politics into a beauty parade
By Nicky Woolf - 13 March 10:00

In the US, beauty pageants are an increasingly popular way for young women to begin a career in public office.

Activists keep riot police at bay standing on makeshift barricades on the Maidan, Kyiv, in January. Photo: Espen Rasmussen/Panon
Ukraine: Rebirth of a nation
By Julian Evans - 11 March 9:21

Bullied and humiliated by Russia, seen as a strategic buffer by the US, Ukraine is riven by corruption and deeply divided. Can it rise and free itself?

A placard reading “A mother by choice” at a pro-choice protest in Spain. Photo: Getty
Porque Yo Decido: Spain’s war on abortion is not about morality – it’s about austerity
By Laurie Penny - 08 March 17:43

Attacking women’s rights isn’t just a diversion tactic. It’s a bid for votes from cultural conservatives.

We mustn’t forget the revolutionary roots of International Women’s Day
By Rebecca Winson - 08 March 10:00

Now marked with Google doodles and special shopping displays, in the early 20th century, International Women's Day was a fierce, worldwide campaign for worker's rights.

A surprising degree of consensus.
The main parties agree on the EU far more than they suggest
By Pawel Swidlicki - 07 March 14:47

Beyond the bluster and rhetoric, there is a surprising degree of consensus on the reforms needed.

Vladimir Putin by André Carrilho for the New Statesman
Leader: Why we need to be honest about Vladimir Putin
By New Statesman - 06 March 13:36

Whatever the Kremlin apologists say – and regardless of the ancient historical and cultural affinities involved – there are few benefits for citizens of Crimea likely to result from their de facto annexation by Russia.

Art regeneration: Viktor Hulik's 1997 street-level statue of "Cumil the Peeper" in Bratislava
Slovakia: life after the velvet divorce
By Angus Roxburgh - 06 March 10:00

Why the former Czechoslovakian state, which gained its “Velvet Divorce” from the Czech Republic in 1993, is one of Europe’s quiet successes.

Rocks and Molotovs vs snipers’ bullets in Kiev
By Andrew Wilson - 06 March 10:00

Ukraine's revolution has been an old-style uprising cut through with violence.

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