The EU flag. Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Leader: The long shadow of decline: is Britain bowing out of the world stage?
By New Statesman - 26 February 9:11

This is no “conscious uncoupling” – the reason Britain’s voice isn't heard in Europe and beyond is, under Cameron, it has little to say. The challenge for Miliband is to show he can do better.

Isis fighters parade through Mosul in June 2014. Photo: Associated Press
John Simpson: Isis is losing in Iraq
By John Simpson - 25 February 9:48

The Iraqi city of Mosul was taken over by Islamic State last summer – but now the government forces are pushing back.

In defence of soft power: why a “war” on terror will never win
By Hamed El-Said - 24 February 14:36

The recent rise in global terrorism is alarming, but it also reaffirms the failure of our purely hard military approach to counter the phenomenon.

An Austrian chocolate torte. Very European. Photo: Alexander Klein/AFP/Getty Images
An EU explainer for the easily bored: where does the UK stand?
By Frances Robinson - 24 February 13:11

Frances Robinson continues her series on what we really need to know about the EU. This week: should the UK stay or should it go?

A man walks past a polling station in Dublin. Photo: Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty
Why are fringe groups allowed the same air-time as LGBT activists in the run-up to Ireland’s marriage equality referendum?
By Paulie Doyle - 23 February 17:07

Under Irish broadcasting law, broadcasters cannot support marriage equality unopposed.

Sameh Shoukry, Foreign Minister of Egypt attends a UN security council briefing on Libya in New York, January 2015. Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Image
Egypt’s long war against terror intensifies as Islamic State proves its military clout
By Sophie McBain - 19 February 14:56

A long, porous border with Libya puts Egypt at risk. Now it is even harder for president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to provide the security his mandate depends on.

People hold candles at a memorial in Copenhagen for those killed by the gunman. Photo: Asger Ladefoged/AFP/Getty
Leader: Europe and the new anti-Semitism
By New Statesman - 18 February 12:51

In recent months, there has been a series of fatal attacks by Islamist militants on Jewish people and institutions, as well as innumerable other instances of violence.

Danish prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt lays flowers outside the synagogue Krystalgade in Copenhagen. Photo: Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty
Copenhagen shootings: PM says an attack on Jewish community is “an attack on all of Denmark”
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 16 February 12:08

Helle Thorning-Schmidt condemned the “cynical act of terror” against Denmark.

Women in Egypt mark the anniversary of the Arab Spring at a rally in Tahrir Square. Photo: Getty
Feminism has been hijacked by white middle-class women
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 13 February 16:23

To paraphrase bell hooks: there is little point making women equal to men when not all men are equal. 

Bashar al-Assad interview: Jeremy Bowen meets Syria’s great survivor
By Jeremy Bowen - 13 February 12:31

War has been raging in Syria for nearly four years and much of the country is in ruins, yet Bashar al-Assad is still in power. And the view from the presidential palace is brightening.

Somali security forces keep vigil during the funeral of assassinated MP Abdullahi Qayad Barre in Mogadishu in February 2015. Photo: Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images
What has happened to the fight against Somalia’s al-Shabab?
By Martin Plaut - 12 February 17:14

The situation is murky, but it is certain that al-Shabab remains undefeated and is still a real threat, not just to Somalia, but to the region as a whole.

Syriza and Podemos: Britain could "learn lessons" from Europe's radical insurgence
By Ashley Cowburn - 12 February 15:50

The European anti-austerity parties, Syriza and Podemos, took centre stage during the change:how? 2015 conference at Islington Metal Works.

Abbott (L) and Turnbull (R) in 2009. Photo: Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images
The febrile world of Australian politics: Turnbull vs Abbott
By Peter Browne - 12 February 12:37

Following this month's failed backbench revolt against prime minister Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull's position is stronger than ever.

A worker installs a flag advertising the cup. Photo: A worker installs a flag for the cup. Photo: Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images
Letter from Equatorial Guinea: forget human rights – here comes the football
By Jonathan Wilson - 12 February 11:09

When Morocco withdrew from hosting the African Cup of Nations, citing Ebola fears, Equatorial Guinea stepped in. But at what cost?

Visitors to a sanatorium in Transnistria, which does not recognise the USSR's collapse.
World on a wire: two books reveal the truth about life in modern Russia
By David Patrikarakos - 12 February 10:57

Peter Pomerantsev's Nothing is True and Everything is Possible meets Rory MacLean and Nick Danziger's Back in the USSR.

A Podemos rally in Madrid. Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images
Podemos goes pro: how the Spanish party are fine-tuning their election message
By Liam Aldous - 12 February 10:11

Much has changed since the protests of 2011. Now, last year's upstart party might just be in with a chance.

Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, her sister Razan, and husband Deah Shaddy Barakat. Photo: Facebook
The Chapel Hill shooting: White male atheist murders three Muslim students
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 11 February 14:51

46-year-old Craig Stephen Hicks has been arrested and charged.

David Cameron and Tony Abbott at the Australian War Memorial. Photo: Mark Nolan/Reuters
The rise of the Anglosphere: how the right dreamed up a new conservative world order
By Michael Kenny and Nick Pearce - 10 February 11:19

The Anglosphere has its roots in the Commonwealth tradition. But today's global world has forged a powerful unofficial alliance.

Rohingya children play by a relief tent at Bawdupah's Internally Displaced People camp on the outskirts of Sittwe. Photo: Soe Than Win/AFP/Getty Images
The Rohingya crisis in Burma has become “a protracted, squalid, stateless status-quo”
By Oliver Griffin - 06 February 14:56

The status of Burma’s Rohingya people has devolved to the point where even naming them has become controversial. We need to do more.

Ed Miliband at the Labour party conference last year. Photo: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images
Leader: Britain's role in the world
By New Statesman - 05 February 15:07

Troubled Labour leader Ed Miliband is said to "not do foreign". But we must consider Britain's place in an increasingly international world.

Moazzam Begg. Photo: David Levenson/Getty Images
Moazzam Begg: it's the FBI, the CIA and MI5 who should be questioned
By Sophie McBain - 05 February 10:06

Moazzam Begg was imprisoned as a terror suspect but never tried. Who is he? What does he want? And why are the security services so interested in him?

The party's leader, Pablo Iglesias. Photo: DANI POZO/AFP/Getty Images
Si, we can! How the left-wing Podemos party is rattling the Spanish establishment
By David Mathieson - 05 February 9:34

As the Spanish election approaches, a surge in support for the party has set the clock ticking.

The shipping container: the ubiquitous unit that has been called the “hidden plumbing of globalisation”. Photo: Paul J Richards/AFP/Getty
Welcome to Containerstan: how the shipping container took over the world
By Timothy P A Cooper - 04 February 16:23

The ubiquitous unit of global commerce has infiltrated every sphere of modern life – whether as a means of trafficking, a symbol of gentrification, or a part of political protest.

Eugene de Kock at a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) hearing in Pretoria 1998. Photo: Walter Dhladhla/AFP/Getty
Releasing Prime Evil: what does Eugene de Kock’s parole mean for South Africa?
By Oliver Griffin - 30 January 17:14

Eugene de Kock, the former commander of the apartheid government’s infamous Vlakplaas unit, has been granted parole after serving 20 years of his two life sentences.

Syriza supporters wave flags at a 2014 rally. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
Don’t let the ridiculous smears fool you: Syriza is no party of the radical “far left”
By Mehdi Hasan - 29 January 15:34

Opposing the logic of neoliberal economics does not mean the Greeks have become Marxists.

Oil barrels. Photo: Miguel Gutierrez/AFP/Getty Images
Your petrol bill may fall, but is cheap oil all good news?
By Felix Martin - 29 January 9:25

The falling oil price may sound like a positive thing, but it follows a series of worrying events in global economics.

In Iraqi security officer guards a church. Photo: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images
Paradise lost: is Christianity doomed in the Middle East?
By Gerard Russell - 29 January 9:10

A religious revival is just one of the factors leaving Christians deserting the Middle East. Diversity must be upheld.

ANEL leader Panos Kammenos arrives for a cabinet meeting. Photo: LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images
The Syriza-ANEL alliance shows the new Greek government has one goal: ending austerity
By Theodora Oikonomides - 28 January 16:15

After a rebuff from the Communist Party of Greece, ANEL became an unlikely coalition partner. But the deal shows Syriza's priorities.

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