Violent response: a woman demonstrating against the Soma mining disaster flees riot police tear gas, 22 May. Photo: Getty
When safety gets privatised: Soma marks a new low for the Turkish government
By Alev Scott - 29 May 10:00

Despite Erdogan’s claims that the disaster was on a par with any other international mining accident in the world since 1862, Turkey’s rate of mining deaths is shocking. 

What happens to your town once a far-right party comes to power?
By Philip and James Kleinfeld - 27 May 15:05

In March’s local elections, the French far-right party the Front National took control of new towns in the rust-belts of the north and south. What has changed there since they came to power?

Marine Le Pen at a press conference after the European election results were announced. Photo: Getty
The Front National’s success in France shows that “protest votes” can no longer be easily dismissed
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 27 May 12:46

The party’s success in the European elections marks the end of its time as a marginal voice in French politics.

Why empires fall: from ancient Rome to Putin's Russia
By Tom Holland - 23 May 16:00

Moscow, to western eyes, does not look much like Rome. But if there is any country in the world where the tug of the Roman ideal can be felt, it is Russia.

Activists have defied the ban on women driving in Saudi Arabia by getting behind the wheel. Photo: Getty
Is Saudi Arabia seeking friends?
By Burhan Al-Chalabi - 23 May 13:16

Saudi Arabia’s poor record on human rights and its treatment of women make it easy to demonise the kingdom.

Spain and Britain - two countries that are wrong (about themselves)
By Tristan Garel-Jones - 19 May 22:34

The British must wake up to the fact that Rule Britannia no longer applies just as Spaniards must stop knocking their own country.

After shock: a Pakistani man comforts a mourner after his relative was killed in a suicide bomb attacck in Karachi on 29 January. Photo: Getty
That suicide bomber was the boy next door
By Sophie McBain - 15 May 10:36

The uncomfortable truth is that bombers and war criminals might not be so different from the rest of us – we are all vulnerable to peer pressure and groupthink.

Mourning call: people gather to remember pro-Russian militants killed in Odessa, southern Ukraine, 10 May. Photo: Getty
Ukraine: as the death toll rises, a collective psychosis is taking hold
By David Patrikarakos - 15 May 10:00

David Patrikarakos reports from Odessa, scene of the bloodiest incident of the Russia-Ukraine conflict so far. 

Saffron warriors: Modi waves to supporters on his way to file nomination papers in Varanasi. Photo: Getty
Narendra Modi: man of the masses
By William Dalrymple - 12 May 17:00

Modi, implicated in a massacre in 2002 while chief minister of Gujarat, has been elected as India’s new prime minister. Is he a dangerous neo-fascist, as some say, or the strongman reformer that this country of 1.2 billion people craves?

The mass death penalties and the wider crackdown on the opposition cannot be tolerated.
The UK must stand against Egypt's disregard of human rights
By Ian Lucas - 08 May 15:27

The mass death penalties and the wider crackdown on the opposition cannot be tolerated.

Battle of balaclava: a masked pro-Russian militant is pictured after some 300 militants stormed the prosecutor's office in Donetsk on 1 May. Photo: Getty
“An uneasy monotony, punctuated by violence, dominates eastern Ukraine”
By David Patrikarakos - 08 May 10:00

David Patrikarakos reports on the worsening crisis in eastern Ukraine, where pro-Russian forces are defiant.

Narendra Modi addressing a rally in Sidhuali near Lucknow, India. Photo: Getty
We must not turn a blind eye to the election of Narendra Modi, India’s Milosevic
By Mehdi Hasan - 02 May 14:10

As a British citizen, I am ashamed that my government is willing to cosy up to standard-bearers of religious fascism – as long, it seems, as they aren’t Muslim.

Harvard to high office: Senator Elizabeth Warren, who heads the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Photo: Getty
Encounters in a Harvard canteen, Elizabeth Warren’s options and the charm of John McCain
By Douglas Alexander - 01 May 15:28

The shadow foreign secretary reports from a four-day trip to the States. 

A priest blesses cakes and painted eggs for Orthodox Easter in the village of Semurovtsy, Belarus, 19 April. Photo: Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images
Belarus is now at risk of losing its independence to Russia
By Charles Grant - 30 April 10:00

Most Belarusians have a somewhat weaker sense of identity than Ukrainians but they feel Belarusian rather than Russian.

Image: Laura Carlin
“We should not hold current states accountable for what happened in the distant past”
By Alexander McCall Smith - 30 April 10:00

But consigning events to history should not preclude the need for apology for ancient wrongs: they can help heal rifts. 

No way home: Syrian refugees sleeping outside the Centre for Temporary Stay of Immigrants (CETI), in Melilla, Spain, 2 April. Photo: Getty
“My heart aches for Syria. I don’t think people think about that”
By Samira Shackle - 29 April 9:40

While 2.6 million Syrians have fled the country, few have so far come to Britain. Yet the current anti-immigration climate ignores the desperate circumstances of those forced here.

"The threat of this radical Islam is not abating. It is growing. It is spreading across the world."
Tony Blair's speech on the Middle East: full text
By Tony Blair - 23 April 8:45

"The threat of this radical Islam is not abating. It is growing. It is spreading across the world."

Venice seen from the air. Photo: Getty
All is not what it seems with Venice’s separatist vote
By Anna Cento Bull - 22 April 11:20

A flash in the pan, or the start of something big?

Portrait of Josef Stalin (1933) by Isaak Izrailevich. Image: Bridgeman Art Library
H G Wells: “It seems to me that I am more to the Left than you, Mr Stalin”
By H G Wells - 18 April 9:00

In 1934, Wells arrived in Moscow to meet a group of Soviet writers. While there Stalin granted him an interview. 

Ukrainian extremists will only triumph if Russia invades
By Timothy Snyder - 17 April 15:51

Ukraine has no future without Europe, but Europe also has no future without Ukraine.

James the evangelist: Jimmy Carter at home in Plains, Georgia
Jimmy Carter: “William Hague is a hero of mine”
By John Bew - 17 April 10:00

Our man in Washington John Bew has coffee with the former US president – and they talk Thatcher, Iran’s Islamic Revolution and the persecution of women.

A pro-Russian activist holds an icon in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk, 9 April. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, the protesters wait for Russia to take charge
By David Patrikarakos - 17 April 10:00

Standing in front of the barricades, two pensioners held up a banner with “For ever with Russia” emblazoned across it. The sentiment was uniform and unambiguous.

Glimmer of hope: women queue to vote in the recent Afghan elections
Leader: the lessons of the Afghanistan misadventure have not been learned
By New Statesman - 11 April 12:00

It was by accident, not by design, that the UK avoided being drawn into the sectarian vortex of Syria.

Photo: Susannah Ireland/Eyevine
Leaving Afghanistan: is it finally time to be positive about this blighted nation?
By William Dalrymple - 10 April 10:13

The Afghan presidential election has been declared a success – but as the west finalises its pull-out, what the country's prospects?

Asma Assad comforts Syrian women in a photo from the offical Instagram account
In Syria, the internet has become just another battleground
By Sophie McBain - 10 April 10:00

President Assad’s Instagram account is one of the more surreal examples of the use of social networking in the Syrian war.

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
Why is Europe failing to protect its Roma population from hate crimes?
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 April 17:31

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

Pro-Russian activists guard a barricade at the Ukrainian regional Security Service building in Donetsk. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, protestors are chanting “New Russia” – an old term that’s back in fashion
By Linda Kinstler - 08 April 9:22

Separatists in Donetsk and elsewhere are harking back to the 18th century territory of Novorossiya, as Moscow seems to be making moves to federalise Ukraine.

The party should start talking about responsible capitalism in a global context.
Labour needs to turn up the volume on international development
By Richard Darlington - 07 April 16:31

Why is Labour not yet talking about responsible capitalism in a global context?

The facts of killing: how do we write about the Rwandan Genocide?
By Giles Foden - 07 April 8:48

Twenty years on, we still struggle to comprehend the trauma.

Pages