Life in ruins: a man walks in the rubble of the Shejaiya residential district of Gaza City, July 28. Photo: Getty
Jason Cowley: Does the left hate Israel?
By Jason Cowley - 28 July 16:01

It shouldn’t be a question of either you support Israel, no matter what it does, or you are on the side of the Islamists. 

Gazans are suffering, says resident Ghada Al Kord. Photo: Alison Baskerville, CARE
Letter from Gaza: “You cannot understand how it feels... There is no dignity”
By Ghada Al Kord - 25 July 13:35

Palestinian Ghada Al Kord tells of the difficulties of navigating a warzone while pregnant and the indignity of being trapped in Gaza. 

What future? A medic helps a man in the wreckage of Shejaia, Gaza. Photo: Reuters
Uri Dromi: Despair is not an option in Gaza
By Uri Dromi - 22 July 17:36

The Israeli economist Yaacov Sheinin proposes a bold economic answer to the rockets – but with the repressive Hamas in charge, would it have any chance of materialising?

Pro-Russia rebels driving a tank through Donetsk today as international tensions increase over access to the MH17 crash site.
David Cameron: Russia faces tougher sanctions for MH17 crash
By Lucy Fisher - 21 July 16:24

The Prime Minister warned President Putin to stop aiding separatists in Ukraine, as responsibility for the MH17 crash was laid at Russia's feet.

John Kerry.
How John Kerry built a peace process for Israel-Palestine, then watched it burn
By Ben Birnbaum and Amir Tibon - 21 July 15:09

Extensive, behind-the-scenes reporting on the Israel-Palestine peace deal that almost was.

Philip Hammond, the newly appointed Foreign Secretary. Photo: Getty
From the Castlereagh-Canning era to Philip Hammond
By John Bew - 17 July 11:37

Philip Hammond's appointment as Foreign Secretary is a triumph for capable functionaries and Little Englanders.

Destroyed: ruins of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, blown up by the Taliban in 2001. Photo: Salim Saheb Ettaba/AFP/Getty
Darius Guppy: the US condemns Iran but allies itself with the ultra-conservative Saudi Arabia
By Darius Guppy - 17 July 10:00

Iran does has grave problems but family life is of a quality that has largely disappeared in the west and privacy is respected. Nor is there any sense of the oppression one finds in Wahhabi societies.

Palestinian firefighters survey the scene of a house destroyed during an Israeli strike. Photo: Getty
We single Israel out because we in the west are shamefully complicit in its crimes
By Mehdi Hasan - 16 July 17:45

The assault on Gaza has been a humanitarian disaster, yet the west's staunch support for Israel continues.

The Capitol building in Washington DC. Photo: Getty
The 2014 US midterms don’t mean anything
By Tod Lindberg - 16 July 12:39

Pundits and polls say the stakes couldn’t be higher. The reality is quite the opposite.

"I am one of thousands of women to have suffered – widows, orphans, victims of sexual abuse and rape".
“My son was killed... but it strengthened my commitment”
By Lucy Fisher - 11 July 11:36

Despite tragedy, two Afghan women explain how they refuse to be cowed by militants from carrying out their work.

Iraqi women at the Khazair displacement camp for those caught-up in the fighting in Mosul. Photo: Getty
The hand-choppers of Isis are deluded: there is nothing Islamic about their caliphate
By Mehdi Hasan - 04 July 16:32

Have we gone back in time? The era of Muslim caliphates came to a close in 1924, when the Ottomans were toppled in Turkey.

Retribution? house destroyed by the Israeli army suspectedly in response to the murdered Israeli teenagers in Hebron on July 1. Photo: Getty
Death comes to Hebron, the birthplace of Judaism
By Edward Platt - 04 July 10:03

Hebron is the city of Abraham, the patriarch from whom all Jews, Muslims and, to a lesser extent, Christians claim descent. It is the emotional heart of the world’s most intractable conflict.

Nicolas Sarkozy appears on television to protest his innocence. Photo: Getty
Nicolas Sarkozy may recover from his latest scandal, but the political class will not be so lucky
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 03 July 16:42

Whatever the outcome of the ongoing corruption investigations, the damage done to trust in public officials will be long-lasting.

Vancouver’s homelessness benches were part of a charity ad campaign
By Barbara Speed - 03 July 11:46

But they’re still better than anti-homelessness spikes.

Slow-burn revolutionary: Princip in prison. Photo: Getty
Gavrilo Princip: the assassin who triggered the First World War
By Tim Butcher - 03 July 10:00

Princip was a slow-burn revolutionary, identifying himself with all Bosnians and committing himself to the ideal of winning freedom for all local Bosnians, not just local Serbs.

Life goes on, for now: the famous Shahbandar café in Baghdad, 27 June. Photo: Getty
Lindsey Hilsum: “Apprehension and excitement at being back in Iraq is eclipsed by fury”
By Lindsey Hilsum - 03 July 10:00

Channel 4 News’s international editor returns to a country where she has strong memories and friendships but finds her movements hampered by customs officials. 

Spy on the wall: a painting of GCHQ displayed in the Mount Street Gallery, London in 2011. Photo: Getty
Laurie Penny: Oh look! There's a new bogeyman on the scene to justify online spying
By Laurie Penny - 03 July 10:00

Liam Fox insists that the “public will accept” increased surveillance because of the threat of terrorism. One suspects that if we don’t accept it, we’ll be made to.

Refuge: Kurdish women in Erbil feed Iraqi Christians fleeing violence in their villages. Photo: Getty
Fergal Keane: “Erbil is a haven. If you wanted a happier dream of Iraq, this is the place to visit”
By Fergal Keane - 01 July 11:00

The BBC correspondent travels to Iraq for the first time since 2003 to find quiet, fearful streets in Jalula but tranquility and tolerance in Iraq’s Kurdish capital. 

We need a European energy union capable of negotiating collectively over price and acting as a strategic sponsor.
Without a stronger response, Russia will win the Great Game of European politics
By David Clark - 27 June 17:41

We need a European energy union capable of negotiating collectively over price and acting as a strategic sponsor.

Iraqi Kurdish soldiers prepare to fight Isis militants 20km south of Kirkuk, 23 June. Photo: Getty
In the Kurds’ make-do capital, Erbil, the message is clear: Iraq needs a three-state solution
By Jonathan Rugman - 26 June 10:00

Accompanied by a small army of peshmerga, I went as close as I dared to the front line, an army base in Kirkuk that the Iraqis had abandoned without putting up much of a fight.

Europe is not just another geopolitical power block. Photo: Getty
Slavoj Žižek: Only a radicalised left can save Europe
By Slavoj Zizek - 25 June 16:32

Austerity is not “too radical”, as some leftist critics claim, but, on the contrary, too superficial, an act of avoiding the true roots of the crisis, says Slavoj Žižek.

Iraqi Turkmen preparing to fight Isis militants last weekend
Isis and the global rise of non-state actors
By Lucy Fisher - 23 June 13:48

The recent onslaught by Isis isn't a rogue success for terrorist groups; non-state actors are on the rise worldwide. We should be watching and wary.

Shakir Waheib, a senior member of Isis, stands next to a burning police car in Anbar Province, Iraq
Blowback: who are Isis and why are young Brits fighting with them?
By John Bew and Shiraz Maher - 23 June 11:54

Hundreds of young British men are said to have joined the murderous group, first in Syria and now on its bloody incursion into Iraq. What happens when they come home?

Clinton voted for military action in Iraq but now admits she got it wrong. Photo: Bloomberg via Getty
The new stateswoman: Hillary Clinton’s steely idealism
By Douglas Alexander - 23 June 10:34

Will Hillary run for president in 2016? Her memoir is more interested in the fine art of diplomacy.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. Photo: Getty
The Sudanese dictatorship: twenty-five years of impunity
By Martin Plaut - 20 June 12:50

Once, the plight of Darfur’s two million refugees would have made front page news. Today they seldom make even a paragraph in the inside pages of British broadsheets, although the repression continues unabated.

Mad or bad? Ex-PM Tony Blair in Hong Kong, 2012. Photo: Getty
Blair’s supporters should stage a humanitarian intervention – and make him shut up about Iraq
By Mehdi Hasan - 18 June 17:02

How many Sure Start centres cancel out the depleted uranium used in Fallujah? Why does record investment in the NHS absolve the torture and abuse in Abu Ghraib?

Iraqi Shiite tribesmen in the south who have volunteered to fight. Photo: Getty
What is going to happen in Iraq?
By Isaac Chotiner - 17 June 13:08

It is not the assertiveness of new entities that is driving change, but the collapse of the old national constructions.

Senator Elizabeth Warren in late 2013. Photo: Getty
Why Elizabeth Warren should take on Hillary Clinton and run for the US presidency
By Mehdi Hasan - 16 June 11:13

Simply by running, Warren will drag the centrist Clinton to the left and put the causes she cares about – financial reform, fairer taxes, income inequality – at the centre of the 2016 presidential election.

New face of justice: along with many black South Africans, Pumla Godobo-Madikizela thinks Eugene de Kock should be freed. Photo: Bloomberg
Should the apartheid regime’s “Prime Evil” be released?
By Eric Abraham - 13 June 12:33

Ten years ago psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela wrote a book about the encounters she had with Eugene de Kock, head of apartheid South Africa’s death squad, when in Pretoria prison. She thinks he should be pardoned. 

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