Fort Kent, Maine, where nurse Kaci Hickox has become the centre of a political controversy. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty
Ebola is the latest political battleground between America’s left and right
By David Millward - 31 October 12:21

The febrile atmosphere of the mid-term elections has turned the response to the disease into a way of playing politics.

Desperate: Liberian health workers at the NGO Medecins Sans Frontieres Ebola treatment centre in Monrovia, 18 October. Photo: Getty
Monrovia, the city at the heart of the ebola outbreak
By Clair MacDougall - 23 October 10:00

At least 200 health workers have been infected with ebola and 90 have died, according to the latest government figures, yet pay is modest. Last week they staged a two-day strike. 

Face off: Hong Kong residents wear Sars masks while watching a funeral procession. Photo: Getty
The plague index: which diseases could still cause chaos?
By Michael Barrett - 22 October 15:20

We defeated or tamed many fatal diseases in the 20th century but many remain a threat. Michael Barrett assesses the contenders for the next pandemic. 

An XXL size tag on a coat hanger. Photo: Getty
Why all new legislation should face an obesity test
By Julia Manning - 16 October 12:10

Obesity is not a future theoretical threat, it is a present catastrophe.

People walk past an ebola treatment centre in Monrovia, Liberia. Photo: Getty
How translators can help stem the ebola crisis
By Lori Thicke - 14 October 13:16

Ignorance about ebola can be as fatal as bodily contact with an infected person. The problem is that most information about how to prevent ebola is not available in the languages understood by the people at risk.

Checking up baby: a doctor cares for a baby in a Paris hospital, 2013. Photo: Getty
The baby only had chickenpox. But then she suddenly stopped breathing
By Phil Whitaker - 09 October 10:00

Dr Phil Whitaker’s Health Matters column. 

We may not have a cure, but at least we can ensure that people can walk down the street without being feared or mocked. Photo: Getty
Schizophrenia is not a fatal illness, yet sufferers are still dying 20 years too soon
By Glosswitch - 06 October 10:42

We have to go beyond the well-meaning commitment to “combat stigma” and be willing to share our time – that extra twenty years we currently have to ourselves – even when we are unable to measure what this will mean.

Casualty of war: a Free Syria Army fighter is treated for minor injuries in 2012. Photo: Getty
The refugee was slowly being killed by his own scar tissue
By Phil Whitaker - 25 September 10:00

Dr Phil Whitaker’s Health Matters column.

Constant headaches often have a more prosaic basis than feared. Photo: Flickr/Sarah G
The woman was suffering from headaches and fearing the worst. Then I weighed her
By Phil Whitaker - 15 September 10:42

Dr Phil Whitaker’s Health Matters column. 

A rack of T-shirts. Photo: oatsy40 on Flickr, via Creative Commons
The Ex-Anorexic’s Guide to Shopping
By Harriet Williamson - 09 September 11:20

Even after an eating disorder is a thing of the past, an action as trivial as flipping through a rack of t-shirts can be difficult.

Mindfulness can be lovingly, painstakingly assaulting fruit. Photo: Getty
Mindfulness: the sexy cure-all for the nail-chewing ailments of my anxiety-ridden generation
By Eleanor Margolis - 05 September 10:43

Or, how I ended up plucking the seeds off a strawberry at six in the morning.

A football fan eats chips before a match. Photo: Getty
Thin people don’t just eat differently to fat people. They live completely different lives
By Helen Lewis - 01 September 10:12

One of the biggest lies about obesity is that it’s simply about eating too much and not doing enough exercise – problems are often far deeper rooted. 

Nurses wearing protective suits escort a man infected with the ebola virus to a hospital in Monrovia, Liberia, 25 August. Photo: Getty
Why releasing untested ebola drugs was the right thing to do
By Michael Brooks - 28 August 10:00

Drug trials rarely tell the whole story as many drugs have side effects that emerge only after deployment in the population at large. Yet unexpected effects can sometimes be surprisingly good.

Spread risk: a Monrovia classroom serves as a rudimentary isolation ward. Photo: John Moore/Getty
West Africa on a hope and a prayer: the desperate efforts to contain ebola
By Charlotte Lytton - 27 August 17:00

The 16 August attack on an ebola clinic in the Liberian capital, Monrovia, is a sign of just how deeply western medicine is mistrusted.

Richard Dawkins’ tweets have caused controversy yet again. Photo: Getty
Why Richard Dawkins’ “abort it and try again” comments about Down’s syndrome babies are so harmful
By Graham Duncan - 22 August 16:02

Parents receiving a pre-natal diagnosis of Down’s syndrome are faced with an awful dilemma and need our care and support. They do not need pseudo-morality and outdated stereotypes.

Glutton meets gourmet: our ideas about healthy eating are becoming ever more confused. Image: Valero Doval
Slightly overweight people live longer – so is it time to rethink our dietary advice?
By Julian Baggini - 21 August 11:50

One of the most unfortunate consequences of this constant revising of recommendations is the belief that no one knows what a good diet is. But look at the bigger picture and the consensus holds steady over time.

Researchers into genetic surgery in Philadelphia developing a technique to eliminate HIV from cells. Photo: Getty
Why DNA testing isn’t always best for customising medical treatment
By George Gillett - 21 August 10:00

Greater understanding of the genetic causes of illness suggests that this method of categorisation might not be the most accurate.

A medication produced by Pfizer, who announced profits of £1.3bn last year. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images
NHS drugs, Aristotle and health economics: the problem of quantifying the value of life
By George Gillett - 18 August 11:05

In light of the news that new cancer medications won’t be made available to NHS patients, it’s worth exploring the difficulties of drug commissioning.

Two heads aren’t better than one: even the most sophisticated antidepressants seem unequal to the challenge of curing our modern malaise
Shrinking horizons: can science offer new answers to mental illness?
By Lisa Appignanesi - 14 August 15:00

It is clear that the NHS and the rise of scientific medicine in the west count among the greatest achievements of the postwar years. But can doctors really be the providers of all our goods?

Bug's life: a woman tends to a shelf full of cockroaches in jars in a lab, c.1955. Photo: Getty
The patient complained of insects crawling on her skin. Then she handed me a glass jar
By Phil Whitaker - 14 August 10:00

The “matchbox sign” describes the tendency of a particular sort of patient to bring spurious evidence in a small container to show the doctor.

A few things that are much scarier than Ebola
By Sophie McBain - 13 August 15:00

When it comes to public health, we're often afraid of the wrong things - and this can have truly nasty side-effects.

NHS staff at Selly Oak Hospital in Birmingham. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
The UK’s mental health care is in crisis – the next government must act urgently
By George Gillett - 01 August 10:59

Mentally ill patients forced to travel hundreds of miles for treatment, forcible sectioning in order to get beds and medical students begging for greater teaching on psychiatry: we're not getting it right

Under pressure: the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham has seen a surge in patients at A&E. Photo: Getty
Jacqui Smith: “The NHS model isn’t broken but it needs urgent attention and support”
By Jacqui Smith - 30 July 11:43

The former home secretary on trouble in A&E – plus the triumph of all-women shortlists and the joys of summer caravanning.

Generation Ritalin: between 10 and 30% of students are estimated to have taken ADHD medication. Photo Getty
Revising on Ritalin: the students who use ADHD meds
By Ajit Niranjan - 24 July 13:00

Between 10 and 30 per cent of British university students have taken pills such as Modafinil and Ritalin to improve their memory and heighten their concentration.

 Bottles of antibiotics line a shelf at a Publix Supermarket pharmacy August 7, 2007 in Miami, Florida. Photo: Getty Images
What next, when the drugs won’t work?
By Zac Goldsmith - 08 July 17:06

The government has made progress on the urgent crisis of antimicrobial resistance, but sustained public pressure is still needed, says Zac Goldsmith.

A smear test can trap a survivor in unstoppable and violent memories. Photo: Getty
Why rape survivors often refuse cervical smears - even if it risks their lives
By Pavan Amara - 08 July 15:29

Cervical smear tests aren’t just stressful for rape survivors – they can trigger powerful flashbacks and violent memories. But avoiding a test can mean preserving your mental health at the risk of your physical well-being.

The Supreme Court in Washington DC. Photo: Getty
The Hobby Lobby decision was a victory for women’s rights
By Andrew Koppelman - 01 July 14:32

The Supreme Court has found a solution that is good for women and good for religious liberty.

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt. Photo: Getty
Diagnosing cancer: why shaming and blaming GPs isn’t about improving patient safety
By Jonathon Tomlinson - 01 July 13:58

Cancer very often presents in ways we don’t expect. Creating a culture of fear around diagnosis isn’t a good thing.

Photo: Getty
Is your GP a buzzer or a meeter? Sometimes, a diagnosis starts in the waiting room
By Phil Whitaker - 19 June 10:58

Sometimes, just going to greet a patient can make all the difference.

Pages