It is being called the most severe health emergency of modern times. But are the fears of mass contagion in the west overblown?
The great ebola scare
By Michael Brooks - 19 October 9:03

It is being called the most severe health emergency of modern times. But are the fears of mass contagion in the west overblown?

The jihadis are fighting on several fronts in two countries – and reports say that demoralised western recruits are increasingly repulsed by the atrocities they have witnessed.
Islamic State can be beaten
By John Simpson - 19 October 8:51

The jihadis are fighting on several fronts in two countries – and reports say that demoralised western recruits are increasingly repulsed by the atrocities they have witnessed.

Islamic State video shows beheading of British aid worker David Haines
By Sophie McBain - 14 September 10:12

The Islamic State video appears to show the killing of a third Western hostage, aid worker David Haines, and ends with the warning that another British person will be next.

The outskirts of Sukkur in Pakistan in 2010. Photo: Getty
Inside jobs and Israeli stooges: why is the Muslim world in thrall to conspiracy theories?
By Mehdi Hasan - 05 September 12:29

The “We’ve been lied to” argument goes only so far. Scepticism may be evidence of a healthy and independent mindset; but conspiracism is a virus that feeds off insecurity and bitterness.

Cambodian Inspectors examine suspected medicine in a crowded market along Thai-Cambodian border during an inspection July 23, 2010 in Pailin province, Cambodia. Photo: Getty Images
Unregulated fake medicines are threatening the fight against diseases like malaria
By Paul Newton - 29 August 12:11

There is currently no international law or body that can organise the detection and prevention of fake medicines - and it's a critical threat to our ability to fight deadly diseases.

The PM is not alone in failing to articulate a clear set of principles for this new era.
After Cameron’s summer of indecision, who will give Britain a coherent foreign policy again?
By George Eaton - 27 August 21:47

The PM is not alone in failing to articulate a clear set of principles for this new era. 

A few things that are much scarier than Ebola
By Sophie McBain - 13 August 15:00

When it comes to public health, we're often afraid of the wrong things - and this can have truly nasty side-effects.

Putin is in international disgrace - the west must make him feel it
Any financial loss to Britain mustn’t obscure the aim of sanctions on Russia
By Robert Macquarie - 04 August 13:19

The cost of recent economic sanctions will be felt in the west, but it’s a cost we can – and should – withstand. 

Global grief: flowers at Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam in memory of the victims of flight MH17, 31 July. Photo: Getty
David Patrikarakos: How the MH17 disaster turned a conflict global
By David Patrikarakos - 31 July 16:12

The downing of Flight MH17 in eastern Ukraine’s Donetsk region, was the deadliest aviation incident since the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

A soldier in the al-Qaeda affiliated Al-Nusra front in Syria, which is part-funded by kidnap. Photo: Getty.
Al-Qaeda earns $125m from ransom payments: should European governments stop paying up?
By Sophie McBain - 30 July 15:37

A New York Times article has suggests that European governments act as an "inadvertent underwriter for al-Qaeda". Should governments pay ransoms when their citizens are taken hostage?

Whoever shot down the Malaysia Airlines plane probably didn't know what they were aiming at
By Linda Kinstler - 18 July 14:57

It’s highly possible that the civilian airliner was mistaken for a Ukrainian Il-76 military transport plane.

World Health Organisation spokesman Glenn Thomas, one of dozens of health experts and officials on MH17. Photo: AAP/United Nations, CC BY
Global Aids community mourns loss of friends and colleagues in MH17 crash
By Liz Minchin and Reema Rattan - 18 July 10:32

Many of those on flight MH17 were experts in Aids research, flying to Kuala Lumpur to make a connecting flight for the 20th International Aids Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

Four tips David Cameron can learn from world leaders on how to use Twitter
By Sophie McBain - 26 June 12:24

What tips can David Cameron learn from the annual Twiplomacy report, which studies how world leaders use Twitter? He needs a little help – not only because he's regularly insulted online, but because Barack Obama won't follow him back. 

Peter Greste and his Al Jazeera colleagues stand inside a cage during their trial. Photo: Getty.
Egypt’s Al Jazeera verdict: the death of the free press
By Sophie McBain - 23 June 11:42

The three Al Jazeera journalists sentenced to seven years in jail in an Egyptian court room today should never have been tried in the first place. And yet, the day before their verdict, the US government released £338m of military aid to Egypt's repressive new rulers. 

Madeleine Rees. Photo: Yasmine Akim
"Let's replace the word gender for power": Madeleine Rees on sexual violence in conflict
By Anoosh Chakelian - 19 June 11:02

The former UN human rights lawyer, and one of the Foreign Secretary's advisers on ending sexual violence in conflict, on how everyday sexism and rape in warfare are on the same continuum.

A kitten and a gun, as posted on Instagram by a jihadi fighter with the hashtag #CatsOfJihad.
Why terrorists tweet about cats
By Ian Steadman - 18 June 13:09

It used to be that extremists used Facebook and YouTube to post recruiting videos - but Isis and its fighters have become adept at using social media to show their side of war.

The rude intrusion of current affairs exposed the limitations of the summit. Photo: Foreign Office on Flickr
Is this the beginning of the end of the war on women’s bodies?
By Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi - 17 June 10:55

The recent summit in London has grabbed headlines, but whether we have now reached a turning point in the fight to end sexual violence in conflict remains to be seen.

How worried should we be about the rise of ISIS, the group “too extreme” for Al Qaeda?
By Sophie McBain - 12 June 17:12

“What I heard today scared the hell out of me”, one US senator said following the capture of Iraq's second city by the hardline jihadist group ISIS. So who are ISIS and how big a threat to they pose?

In some Pacific Islands as many as one in three adults have type 2 diabetes. Photo: Getty.
Where's the public outrage at the diabetes epidemic?
By Sophie McBain - 12 June 14:55

Worldwide, diabetes kills almost as many people a year as HIV/Aids, and the number of cases of Type 2 diabetes is set to increase by 50 per cent in the next decade. Why is so little being done to contain the epidemic? 

This week's summit must not be the culmination of the government's efforts.
We need to do go much further to end sexual violence in conflict
By Kerry McCarthy - 09 June 9:51

This week's summit must not be the culmination of the government's efforts.

A woman smokes marijuana during the World Day for the Legalization of Marijuana in Colombia, 3 May 2014. Photo: RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images
Why the costly, pointless war on drugs must come to an end
By John Collins - 06 May 17:12

A new report from the London School of Economics lays out the case against the counter-productive decades-long attack on recreational drugs.

Abuse of women domestic workers in Qatar exposes uncomfortable truths closer to home
By Sophie McBain - 23 April 13:42

A new report from Amnesty International describes how domestic workers in Qatar face abuse and exploitation. The problem isn't just limited to Qatar, however: domestic workers in the UK are similarly vulnerable.

The chained fist of the statue celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the US. Photo: Getty
Much of Britain's wealth is built on slavery. So why shouldn't it pay reparations?
By Priyamvada Gopal - 23 April 10:09

The benefits of slavery have accrued down the generations, so why are we so nervous about the responsibility for the slave trade doing the same?

Would shorter working hours boost productivity? Photo: Getty.
Why we should all be working less
By Sophie McBain - 10 April 13:18

France has introduced a new law to prevent employees being asked to read work emails outside office hours. Would it help solve the UK's productivity problem if we followed suit?

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
Why is Europe failing to protect its Roma population from hate crimes?
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 April 17:31

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

The party should start talking about responsible capitalism in a global context.
Labour needs to turn up the volume on international development
By Richard Darlington - 07 April 16:31

Why is Labour not yet talking about responsible capitalism in a global context?

Why international rankings of countries are completely pointless
By Sophie McBain - 03 April 14:37

The UK is ranked 13 out of 132 countries in the new Social Progress Index, thanks to its excellent universities but comparatively high rates of obesity. But when will we realise that these lists are really meaningless?

Salimata Knight, an FGM survivor, in March 2004 at an event launching the Female Genital Mutilation Act. Photo: Getty
Why did the first prosecution for female genital mutilation take almost 30 years?
By Sarah Ditum - 24 March 11:03

The legislation outlawing FGM was introduced in 1985, but there were no prosecutions until last week. Why?

Why aren’t EU states delivering on their humanitarian aid pledges?
By Sophie McBain - 19 March 12:44

The EU is the world’s largest humanitarian donor, and it is facing a funding gap of almost half a billion euros.

Laura Bates of the Everyday Sexism project in the film “Shouting Back” by Dan Reed.
Everyday Sexism speech to the UN: “Sexism and sexual harassment is not a ‘women’s issue’ – it is a matter of human rights”
By Laura Bates - 13 March 14:45

To describe sexism, sexual harassment, and sexual violence as “women’s issues” side-lines and reduces them, neglects male victims and lets perpetrators off the hook. One in three women on the planet will be raped or beaten in her lifetime.

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