Would shorter working hours boost productivity? Photo: Getty.
Why we should all be working less
By Sophie McBain - 10 April 13:18

France has introduced a new law to prevent employees being asked to read work emails outside office hours. Would it help solve the UK's productivity problem if we followed suit?

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
Why is Europe failing to protect its Roma population from hate crimes?
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 April 17:31

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

The party should start talking about responsible capitalism in a global context.
Labour needs to turn up the volume on international development
By Richard Darlington - 07 April 16:31

Why is Labour not yet talking about responsible capitalism in a global context?

Why international rankings of countries are completely pointless
By Sophie McBain - 03 April 14:37

The UK is ranked 13 out of 132 countries in the new Social Progress Index, thanks to its excellent universities but comparatively high rates of obesity. But when will we realise that these lists are really meaningless?

Salimata Knight, an FGM survivor, in March 2004 at an event launching the Female Genital Mutilation Act. Photo: Getty
Why did the first prosecution for female genital mutilation take almost 30 years?
By Sarah Ditum - 24 March 11:03

The legislation outlawing FGM was introduced in 1985, but there were no prosecutions until last week. Why?

Why aren’t EU states delivering on their humanitarian aid pledges?
By Sophie McBain - 19 March 12:44

The EU is the world’s largest humanitarian donor, and it is facing a funding gap of almost half a billion euros.

Laura Bates of the Everyday Sexism project in the film “Shouting Back” by Dan Reed.
Everyday Sexism speech to the UN: “Sexism and sexual harassment is not a ‘women’s issue’ – it is a matter of human rights”
By Laura Bates - 13 March 14:45

To describe sexism, sexual harassment, and sexual violence as “women’s issues” side-lines and reduces them, neglects male victims and lets perpetrators off the hook. One in three women on the planet will be raped or beaten in her lifetime.

China’s billionaire politicians quadruple their wealth
By Sophie McBain - 06 March 12:16

Despite their low official government salaries, at this week’s National People’s Congress annual meeting, there will be 86 renminbi billionaires and China’s richest politicians have quadrupled their wealth in the past eight years. But is there a right level to set politicians’ pay?

Why are one million babies a year dying in their first day of life?
By Sophie McBain - 25 February 16:37

The first 24 hours in a baby's life are the most dangerous, but newborn deaths have been under-researched and neonatal care is under-funded.

Ugandan president Yoweri Museveni signs anti-gay bill
By Sophie McBain - 24 February 12:42

The new law will make it virtually impossible to be openly gay in Uganda, and follows the stricter anti-gay laws passed in Nigeria last month. So what is driving this increased homophobia and anti-gay legislation?

Migrant workers at Qatar's world cup stadium. Photo: Getty.
400 Nepalese construction workers have died since Qatar won the World Cup bid
By Sophie McBain - 17 February 12:37

Why are international sporting events so dangerous for construction workers?

Gender inequality is costing the global economy trillions of dollars a year
By Sophie McBain - 12 February 15:00

A UN report released today has found that progress made towards reducing poverty is at risk of being reversed because of widening inequality and a failure to strengthen women's rights.

Why obesity is no longer a rich world problem
By Sophie McBain - 03 January 11:52

Obesity rates triple in developing countries. A report by the Overseas Development Institute has found that one in three adults globally is obese.

How to have a sensible conversation about immigration
By Paul Collier - 21 November 11:15

The poor of the world are on the move, eager to live and work in rich nations. What are the consequences? Talking about them cannot be a taboo.

New Statesman
Why Britain is a world leader in financial secrecy
By Sophie McBain - 07 November 10:56

Between $21-32trn of private wealth is kept in tax havens, and Britain is at the very centre of a global financial system that allows the wealthy to avoid tax.

New Statesman
Amnesty International: US may be guilty of war crimes in Pakistan
By Sophie McBain - 22 October 12:00

Several reports released this week are adding pressure on the US to disclose information about its deadly drone programme and civilian casualties.

New Statesman
How do Tesco's food waste figures compare internationally?
By Sophie McBain - 21 October 12:41

Tesco wastes 30,000 tonnes of food in six months, but how does the UK compare with other countries on food waste?

New Statesman
How can there still be 30m people living as slaves in 2013?
By Sophie McBain - 17 October 11:08

A new report reveals the extent of modern slavery worldwide, and finds that India has the highest number of enslaved people at 1.2m.

New Statesman
The thalidomide victims still seeking compensation
By Sophie McBain - 15 October 15:38

The ongoing legal battles against Grunenthal matter, both for those affected by thalidomide and because of the precedent they set.

New Statesman
OPCW wins Nobel Peace Prize
By Holly Baxter - 11 October 10:18

Awarded the prize "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons".

New Statesman
How big a difference will the world's first malaria vaccine make?
By Sophie McBain - 08 October 10:51

By 2015, GlaxoSmithKline hopes to market the world's first malaria vaccine. But a lot more needs to be done to tackle a disease that kills 660,000 people a year.

New Statesman
Behind the scenes at US-Iran talks
By Sophie McBain - 26 September 13:30

What factors will really affect the outcome of negotiations between the US and Iran?

New Statesman
Panda diplomats: can you put a price on cuteness?
By Sophie McBain - 25 September 10:51

How China uses pandas to help secure long-term trade deals.

New Statesman
More than 1 in 10 children are trapped in child labour
By Sophie McBain - 24 September 17:32

The number of child labourers has decreased by a third since 2000, but there are still 168 million child workers.

New Statesman
What you need to know about al-Shabab
By Sophie McBain - 23 September 11:07

How the militant Somalia group behind the deadly attack on a Kenyan shopping centre formed, and why it is attacking foreign targets now.

New Statesman
Inequality reaches a record high in the US, but which countries are worst off?
By Sophie McBain - 13 September 11:07

Five years after Lehman Brother's collapse, one group has fared spectacularly well: the richest 1 per cent. The world's superpower is now worryingly dependent on the financial fortunes of just 1.35m taxpayers. But where in the world is inequality the grea

New Statesman
Syria: Who else hasn't signed up to the chemical weapons treaty?
By Sophie McBain - 11 September 10:25

Egypt, North Korea, Angola, South Sudan, Israel and Myanmar haven't ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention, and Russia and the US haven't met their obligations under the convention. So what power does the CWC have?

A boy lifts used cabling in Ghana.
Alexei Sayle on what makes us human: We need to realise that the best things in life are not things
By Alexei Sayle - 10 July 8:00

Continuing our What Makes Us Human series, Alexei Sayle reflects on the time Paul McKenna planted a suicidal post-hypnotic suggestion in his brain, and how our restlessness has been exploited to devastating effect.

What happened to India’s economic miracle?
By William Dalrymple - 05 July 12:01

The elephant untethered.

New Statesman
On Solid Ground: Photographing the displaced
By Charlotte Simmonds - 20 June 15:47

A new exhibition captures the trauma of those forced to flee to survive.

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