The EU flag. Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Leader: The long shadow of decline: is Britain bowing out of the world stage?
By New Statesman - 26 February 9:11

This is no “conscious uncoupling” – the reason Britain’s voice isn't heard in Europe and beyond is, under Cameron, it has little to say. The challenge for Miliband is to show he can do better.

In defence of soft power: why a “war” on terror will never win
By Hamed El-Said - 24 February 14:36

The recent rise in global terrorism is alarming, but it also reaffirms the failure of our purely hard military approach to counter the phenomenon.

David Cameron and Tony Abbott at the Australian War Memorial. Photo: Mark Nolan/Reuters
The rise of the Anglosphere: how the right dreamed up a new conservative world order
By Michael Kenny and Nick Pearce - 10 February 11:19

The Anglosphere has its roots in the Commonwealth tradition. But today's global world has forged a powerful unofficial alliance.

Five million dollars in cash. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Leader: The 1 per cent and the masses
By New Statesman - 22 January 12:00

The thesis developed by Capital author Thomas Piketty is set to be vindicated, with the most prominent critiques of inequality now economic.

In cartoons: the global response to the attack on Charlie Hebdo
By Anoosh Chakelian - 08 January 14:32

How cartoonists around the world reacted to the murder of journalists and cartoonists at the French satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo.

Pedestrians walk under a board listing foreign currency rates against the Russian ruble outside an exchange office in central Moscow, on December 17, 2014. Photo: Getty Images
Rouble trouble: oil's plunge has given Putin a serious headache
By Xan Rice - 17 December 14:21

The fall in oil's price is being felt keenly in Moscow, where the Putin government is struggling to cope with the knock-on effects.

Migrants prepare to cast off the beach at Shimbiro, Somalia, for a perilous journey across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen and beyond. Photo: Alixandra Fazina/Noor
From Africa to Kent: following in the footsteps of migrants
By Daniel Trilling - 11 December 9:47

The guardians of Fortress Europe are fighting a lost battle: poor migrants will always try to find a better life for themselves, or die in the attempt. Daniel Trilling traces their steps, from the Middle East and Africa to the Kent countryside.

Illustration: André Carrilho
The great ebola scare
By Michael Brooks - 19 October 9:03

It is being called the most severe health emergency of modern times. But are the fears of mass contagion in the west overblown?

Watching and waiting: tanks outside Kobane, where Islamic State forces are ballting Syrian Kurds. Photo: Ibrahim Erikan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
Islamic State can be beaten
By John Simpson - 19 October 8:51

The jihadis are fighting on several fronts in two countries – and reports say that demoralised western recruits are increasingly repulsed by the atrocities they have witnessed.

Islamic State video shows beheading of British aid worker David Haines
By Sophie McBain - 14 September 10:12

The Islamic State video appears to show the killing of a third Western hostage, aid worker David Haines, and ends with the warning that another British person will be next.

The outskirts of Sukkur in Pakistan in 2010. Photo: Getty
Inside jobs and Israeli stooges: why is the Muslim world in thrall to conspiracy theories?
By Mehdi Hasan - 05 September 12:29

The “We’ve been lied to” argument goes only so far. Scepticism may be evidence of a healthy and independent mindset; but conspiracism is a virus that feeds off insecurity and bitterness.

Cambodian Inspectors examine suspected medicine in a crowded market along Thai-Cambodian border during an inspection July 23, 2010 in Pailin province, Cambodia. Photo: Getty Images
Unregulated fake medicines are threatening the fight against diseases like malaria
By Paul Newton - 29 August 12:11

There is currently no international law or body that can organise the detection and prevention of fake medicines - and it's a critical threat to our ability to fight deadly diseases.

The PM is not alone in failing to articulate a clear set of principles for this new era.
After Cameron’s summer of indecision, who will give Britain a coherent foreign policy again?
By George Eaton - 27 August 21:47

The PM is not alone in failing to articulate a clear set of principles for this new era. 

A few things that are much scarier than Ebola
By Sophie McBain - 13 August 15:00

When it comes to public health, we're often afraid of the wrong things - and this can have truly nasty side-effects.

Putin is in international disgrace - the west must make him feel it
Any financial loss to Britain mustn’t obscure the aim of sanctions on Russia
By Robert Macquarie - 04 August 13:19

The cost of recent economic sanctions will be felt in the west, but it’s a cost we can – and should – withstand. 

Global grief: flowers at Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam in memory of the victims of flight MH17, 31 July. Photo: Getty
David Patrikarakos: How the MH17 disaster turned a conflict global
By David Patrikarakos - 31 July 16:12

The downing of Flight MH17 in eastern Ukraine’s Donetsk region, was the deadliest aviation incident since the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

A soldier in the al-Qaeda affiliated Al-Nusra front in Syria, which is part-funded by kidnap. Photo: Getty.
Al-Qaeda earns $125m from ransom payments: should European governments stop paying up?
By Sophie McBain - 30 July 15:37

A New York Times article has suggests that European governments act as an "inadvertent underwriter for al-Qaeda". Should governments pay ransoms when their citizens are taken hostage?

Whoever shot down the Malaysia Airlines plane probably didn't know what they were aiming at
By Linda Kinstler - 18 July 14:57

It’s highly possible that the civilian airliner was mistaken for a Ukrainian Il-76 military transport plane.

World Health Organisation spokesman Glenn Thomas, one of dozens of health experts and officials on MH17. Photo: AAP/United Nations, CC BY
Global Aids community mourns loss of friends and colleagues in MH17 crash
By Liz Minchin and Reema Rattan - 18 July 10:32

Many of those on flight MH17 were experts in Aids research, flying to Kuala Lumpur to make a connecting flight for the 20th International Aids Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

Four tips David Cameron can learn from world leaders on how to use Twitter
By Sophie McBain - 26 June 12:24

What tips can David Cameron learn from the annual Twiplomacy report, which studies how world leaders use Twitter? He needs a little help – not only because he's regularly insulted online, but because Barack Obama won't follow him back. 

Peter Greste and his Al Jazeera colleagues stand inside a cage during their trial. Photo: Getty.
Egypt’s Al Jazeera verdict: the death of the free press
By Sophie McBain - 23 June 11:42

The three Al Jazeera journalists sentenced to seven years in jail in an Egyptian court room today should never have been tried in the first place. And yet, the day before their verdict, the US government released £338m of military aid to Egypt's repressive new rulers. 

Madeleine Rees. Photo: Yasmine Akim
"Let's replace the word gender for power": Madeleine Rees on sexual violence in conflict
By Anoosh Chakelian - 19 June 11:02

The former UN human rights lawyer, and one of the Foreign Secretary's advisers on ending sexual violence in conflict, on how everyday sexism and rape in warfare are on the same continuum.

A kitten and a gun, as posted on Instagram by a jihadi fighter with the hashtag #CatsOfJihad.
Why terrorists tweet about cats
By Ian Steadman - 18 June 13:09

It used to be that extremists used Facebook and YouTube to post recruiting videos - but Isis and its fighters have become adept at using social media to show their side of war.

The rude intrusion of current affairs exposed the limitations of the summit. Photo: Foreign Office on Flickr
Is this the beginning of the end of the war on women’s bodies?
By Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi - 17 June 10:55

The recent summit in London has grabbed headlines, but whether we have now reached a turning point in the fight to end sexual violence in conflict remains to be seen.

How worried should we be about the rise of ISIS, the group “too extreme” for Al Qaeda?
By Sophie McBain - 12 June 17:12

“What I heard today scared the hell out of me”, one US senator said following the capture of Iraq's second city by the hardline jihadist group ISIS. So who are ISIS and how big a threat to they pose?

In some Pacific Islands as many as one in three adults have type 2 diabetes. Photo: Getty.
Where's the public outrage at the diabetes epidemic?
By Sophie McBain - 12 June 14:55

Worldwide, diabetes kills almost as many people a year as HIV/Aids, and the number of cases of Type 2 diabetes is set to increase by 50 per cent in the next decade. Why is so little being done to contain the epidemic? 

This week's summit must not be the culmination of the government's efforts.
We need to do go much further to end sexual violence in conflict
By Kerry McCarthy - 09 June 9:51

This week's summit must not be the culmination of the government's efforts.

A woman smokes marijuana during the World Day for the Legalization of Marijuana in Colombia, 3 May 2014. Photo: RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images
Why the costly, pointless war on drugs must come to an end
By John Collins - 06 May 17:12

A new report from the London School of Economics lays out the case against the counter-productive decades-long attack on recreational drugs.

Abuse of women domestic workers in Qatar exposes uncomfortable truths closer to home
By Sophie McBain - 23 April 13:42

A new report from Amnesty International describes how domestic workers in Qatar face abuse and exploitation. The problem isn't just limited to Qatar, however: domestic workers in the UK are similarly vulnerable.

The chained fist of the statue celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the US. Photo: Getty
Much of Britain's wealth is built on slavery. So why shouldn't it pay reparations?
By Priyamvada Gopal - 23 April 10:09

The benefits of slavery have accrued down the generations, so why are we so nervous about the responsibility for the slave trade doing the same?

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