Whoever shot down the Malaysia Airlines plane probably didn't know what they were aiming at
By Linda Kinstler - 18 July 14:57

It’s highly possible that the civilian airliner was mistaken for a Ukrainian Il-76 military transport plane.

World Health Organisation spokesman Glenn Thomas, one of dozens of health experts and officials on MH17. Photo: AAP/United Nations, CC BY
Global Aids community mourns loss of friends and colleagues in MH17 crash
By Liz Minchin and Reema Rattan - 18 July 10:32

Many of those on flight MH17 were experts in Aids research, flying to Kuala Lumpur to make a connecting flight for the 20th International Aids Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

Four tips David Cameron can learn from world leaders on how to use Twitter
By Sophie McBain - 26 June 12:24

What tips can David Cameron learn from the annual Twiplomacy report, which studies how world leaders use Twitter? He needs a little help – not only because he's regularly insulted online, but because Barack Obama won't follow him back. 

Peter Greste and his Al Jazeera colleagues stand inside a cage during their trial. Photo: Getty.
Egypt’s Al Jazeera verdict: the death of the free press
By Sophie McBain - 23 June 11:42

The three Al Jazeera journalists sentenced to seven years in jail in an Egyptian court room today should never have been tried in the first place. And yet, the day before their verdict, the US government released £338m of military aid to Egypt's repressive new rulers. 

Madeleine Rees. Photo: Yasmine Akim
"Let's replace the word gender for power": Madeleine Rees on sexual violence in conflict
By Anoosh Chakelian - 19 June 11:02

The former UN human rights lawyer, and one of the Foreign Secretary's advisers on ending sexual violence in conflict, on how everyday sexism and rape in warfare are on the same continuum.

A kitten and a gun, as posted on Instagram by a jihadi fighter with the hashtag #CatsOfJihad.
Why terrorists tweet about cats
By Ian Steadman - 18 June 13:09

It used to be that extremists used Facebook and YouTube to post recruiting videos - but Isis and its fighters have become adept at using social media to show their side of war.

The rude intrusion of current affairs exposed the limitations of the summit. Photo: Foreign Office on Flickr
Is this the beginning of the end of the war on women’s bodies?
By Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi - 17 June 10:55

The recent summit in London has grabbed headlines, but whether we have now reached a turning point in the fight to end sexual violence in conflict remains to be seen.

How worried should we be about the rise of ISIS, the group “too extreme” for Al Qaeda?
By Sophie McBain - 12 June 17:12

“What I heard today scared the hell out of me”, one US senator said following the capture of Iraq's second city by the hardline jihadist group ISIS. So who are ISIS and how big a threat to they pose?

In some Pacific Islands as many as one in three adults have type 2 diabetes. Photo: Getty.
Where's the public outrage at the diabetes epidemic?
By Sophie McBain - 12 June 14:55

Worldwide, diabetes kills almost as many people a year as HIV/Aids, and the number of cases of Type 2 diabetes is set to increase by 50 per cent in the next decade. Why is so little being done to contain the epidemic? 

This week's summit must not be the culmination of the government's efforts.
We need to do go much further to end sexual violence in conflict
By Kerry McCarthy - 09 June 9:51

This week's summit must not be the culmination of the government's efforts.

A woman smokes marijuana during the World Day for the Legalization of Marijuana in Colombia, 3 May 2014. Photo: RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images
Why the costly, pointless war on drugs must come to an end
By John Collins - 06 May 17:12

A new report from the London School of Economics lays out the case against the counter-productive decades-long attack on recreational drugs.

Abuse of women domestic workers in Qatar exposes uncomfortable truths closer to home
By Sophie McBain - 23 April 13:42

A new report from Amnesty International describes how domestic workers in Qatar face abuse and exploitation. The problem isn't just limited to Qatar, however: domestic workers in the UK are similarly vulnerable.

The chained fist of the statue celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the US. Photo: Getty
Much of Britain's wealth is built on slavery. So why shouldn't it pay reparations?
By Priyamvada Gopal - 23 April 10:09

The benefits of slavery have accrued down the generations, so why are we so nervous about the responsibility for the slave trade doing the same?

Would shorter working hours boost productivity? Photo: Getty.
Why we should all be working less
By Sophie McBain - 10 April 13:18

France has introduced a new law to prevent employees being asked to read work emails outside office hours. Would it help solve the UK's productivity problem if we followed suit?

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
Why is Europe failing to protect its Roma population from hate crimes?
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 April 17:31

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

The party should start talking about responsible capitalism in a global context.
Labour needs to turn up the volume on international development
By Richard Darlington - 07 April 16:31

Why is Labour not yet talking about responsible capitalism in a global context?

Why international rankings of countries are completely pointless
By Sophie McBain - 03 April 14:37

The UK is ranked 13 out of 132 countries in the new Social Progress Index, thanks to its excellent universities but comparatively high rates of obesity. But when will we realise that these lists are really meaningless?

Salimata Knight, an FGM survivor, in March 2004 at an event launching the Female Genital Mutilation Act. Photo: Getty
Why did the first prosecution for female genital mutilation take almost 30 years?
By Sarah Ditum - 24 March 11:03

The legislation outlawing FGM was introduced in 1985, but there were no prosecutions until last week. Why?

Why aren’t EU states delivering on their humanitarian aid pledges?
By Sophie McBain - 19 March 12:44

The EU is the world’s largest humanitarian donor, and it is facing a funding gap of almost half a billion euros.

Laura Bates of the Everyday Sexism project in the film “Shouting Back” by Dan Reed.
Everyday Sexism speech to the UN: “Sexism and sexual harassment is not a ‘women’s issue’ – it is a matter of human rights”
By Laura Bates - 13 March 14:45

To describe sexism, sexual harassment, and sexual violence as “women’s issues” side-lines and reduces them, neglects male victims and lets perpetrators off the hook. One in three women on the planet will be raped or beaten in her lifetime.

China’s billionaire politicians quadruple their wealth
By Sophie McBain - 06 March 12:16

Despite their low official government salaries, at this week’s National People’s Congress annual meeting, there will be 86 renminbi billionaires and China’s richest politicians have quadrupled their wealth in the past eight years. But is there a right level to set politicians’ pay?

Why are one million babies a year dying in their first day of life?
By Sophie McBain - 25 February 16:37

The first 24 hours in a baby's life are the most dangerous, but newborn deaths have been under-researched and neonatal care is under-funded.

Ugandan president Yoweri Museveni signs anti-gay bill
By Sophie McBain - 24 February 12:42

The new law will make it virtually impossible to be openly gay in Uganda, and follows the stricter anti-gay laws passed in Nigeria last month. So what is driving this increased homophobia and anti-gay legislation?

Migrant workers at Qatar's world cup stadium. Photo: Getty.
400 Nepalese construction workers have died since Qatar won the World Cup bid
By Sophie McBain - 17 February 12:37

Why are international sporting events so dangerous for construction workers?

Gender inequality is costing the global economy trillions of dollars a year
By Sophie McBain - 12 February 15:00

A UN report released today has found that progress made towards reducing poverty is at risk of being reversed because of widening inequality and a failure to strengthen women's rights.

Why obesity is no longer a rich world problem
By Sophie McBain - 03 January 11:52

Obesity rates triple in developing countries. A report by the Overseas Development Institute has found that one in three adults globally is obese.

How to have a sensible conversation about immigration
By Paul Collier - 21 November 11:15

The poor of the world are on the move, eager to live and work in rich nations. What are the consequences? Talking about them cannot be a taboo.

New Statesman
Why Britain is a world leader in financial secrecy
By Sophie McBain - 07 November 10:56

Between $21-32trn of private wealth is kept in tax havens, and Britain is at the very centre of a global financial system that allows the wealthy to avoid tax.

New Statesman
Amnesty International: US may be guilty of war crimes in Pakistan
By Sophie McBain - 22 October 12:00

Several reports released this week are adding pressure on the US to disclose information about its deadly drone programme and civilian casualties.

New Statesman
How do Tesco's food waste figures compare internationally?
By Sophie McBain - 21 October 12:41

Tesco wastes 30,000 tonnes of food in six months, but how does the UK compare with other countries on food waste?

Pages