Pro-Russian activists guard a barricade at the Ukrainian regional Security Service building in Donetsk. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, protestors are chanting “New Russia” – an old term that’s back in fashion
By Linda Kinstler - 08 April 9:22

Separatists in Donetsk and elsewhere are harking back to the 18th century territory of Novorossiya, as Moscow seems to be making moves to federalise Ukraine.

Franz Alekseyevich Roubaud's panoramic painting The Siege of Sevastopol (1854-55) shows the Charge of the Light Brigade. (Image: Bridgeman Art Library)
Defend the west: is it time to re-arm?
By Brendan Simms - 03 April 11:00

Europe should not underestimate the Russian threat, argues historian and professor of international relations Brendan Simms. We must show how seriously we take Putin’s assault on Ukraine by working towards unification and moral and military rearmament.

Nigel Farage and Nick Clegg during first of the two debates on Europe. Photo: Getty
Why does Nigel Farage want us to follow the lead of countries that are smaller than Bristol?
By Mehdi Hasan - 03 April 9:17

Eurosceptics harp on about the need for democracy. But the Swiss, like the Norwegians and the Icelanders, choose to eat food from a table at which they have no seat.

New-found confidence: Vladimir Putin at the Sochi Paralympics closing ceremony last month. (Photo: Getty)
Letter from Moscow: the mood turns nasty
By Angus Roxburgh - 01 April 14:01

In the wake of the Ukraine crisis a rampant chauvinism has been unleashed,  while sanctions on Russia have created the kind of atmosphere dictators love.

Anne Hidalgo's victory in Paris was a small consolation for the French left. Photograph: Getty.
French Socialists humiliated in local elections
By Raphael Gray - 31 March 14:41

Good news for Ukip, bad news for Labour.

A rousing speech on the dangers of Swedish nationalism is a bit of a turn-off. Photo: Getty
2am in a gay bar in Stockholm is the best time to discuss the NHS
By Eleanor Margolis - 28 March 11:35

If you’re a Scene Lesbian, whenever you’re abroad, you feel obligated to have a quick look at what gays do for fun wherever you are.

Russia's revenge: why the west will never understand the Kremlin
By Angus Roxburgh - 27 March 10:00

The events in Ukraine are Putin’s payback for what he considers to be a quarter-century of humiliation since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
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Citizens in Simferopol, Ukraine watch Putin on a laptop declaring Crimea part of Russia. (Photo: Getty)
Vlad the impatient: why timid western politics won’t wash with Putin
By Julian Evans - 20 March 10:00

The world waits to see how far the fire that has been lit by Russia’s invasion of Crimea will spread in Ukraine and elsewhere.

A symbolic change.
Eurosceptics will do well in May, but the federalists will retain their grip
By Richard Mylles - 18 March 9:51

The parliamentary alliance between the the centre-right and the centre-left means the increase in the number of eurosceptic MEPs will have a largely symbolic effect.

Pro-Russia Crimeans celebrating in Sevastopol. Photo: Getty
The Crimea vote is awkward for the west – but it isn’t unprecedented
By James Dawson - 17 March 12:22

Would a free vote have gone in Russia’s favour anyway?

We are committed to making the EU work better for Britain.
How Labour will work for real change in Europe
By Douglas Alexander - 14 March 16:12

We need to boost Europe’s competitiveness, avoid a race to the bottom on skills and wages and ensure EU migrants contribute to our economy and our society.

Moscow liberals are discovering that the ground has shifted beneath their feet since Putin came back to power in 2012. Photo: Getty
While the west watches Crimea, Putin is cracking down in Moscow
By Julia Ioffe - 14 March 12:06

There’s suddenly not much left of the independent media in Russia, even of what little of it there was left after Putin’s first two terms at the wheel.

A Syrian greengrocer next to a bombed out building in the Shaar district of Aleppo, February 2014. Photo: Mohammed al-Khatieb/AFP/Getty Images
Jeremy Bowen: I know there’s trouble in the Middle East when I need my flak jacket, gas mask and Kevlar pants
By Jeremy Bowen - 07 March 17:00

The BBC’s Middle East editor on John Kerry striking the wrong tone over Ukraine, and remembering the Aleppo souks.

A surprising degree of consensus.
The main parties agree on the EU far more than they suggest
By Pawel Swidlicki - 07 March 14:47

Beyond the bluster and rhetoric, there is a surprising degree of consensus on the reforms needed.

Vladimir Putin by André Carrilho for the New Statesman
Leader: Why we need to be honest about Vladimir Putin
By New Statesman - 06 March 13:36

Whatever the Kremlin apologists say – and regardless of the ancient historical and cultural affinities involved – there are few benefits for citizens of Crimea likely to result from their de facto annexation by Russia.

Art regeneration: Viktor Hulik's 1997 street-level statue of "Cumil the Peeper" in Bratislava
Slovakia: life after the velvet divorce
By Angus Roxburgh - 06 March 10:00

Why the former Czechoslovakian state, which gained its “Velvet Divorce” from the Czech Republic in 1993, is one of Europe’s quiet successes.

Energy security must be pursued with far greater speed.
How the west can match Putin's grand strategy
By Marcus Roberts - 05 March 14:34

Ukrainian and Georgian NATO membership should be fast-tracked and energy security pursued with far greater vigour and speed.

A unit claiming to be Cossack and other citizen pro-Russian volunteers outside a Ukrainian miltary base in the Crimea. Photo: Getty
Why Vladimir Putin needs a poor, aggressive Russia
By KermlinRussia - 03 March 12:03

If you can’t improve people’s living standards, you can try to give them a sense of belonging to a great power.

The Foreign Secretary says this "is an entirely different situation".
Hague denies Iraq war has undermined western stance over Ukraine
By George Eaton - 03 March 9:00

The Foreign Secretary says Ukraine "is an entirely different situation" after John Kerry criticises Russia for "invading another country on completely trumped up pretext".

The europhile and the europhobe.
Where Clegg and Farage agree: Cameron's EU renegotiation plan is a fantasy
By George Eaton - 28 February 15:53

It will become harder for the PM to insist he can succeed when the europhile and the europhobe both declare he will fail.

It’s no again to all things Euro: the rise of the new Eurosceptics
By Mark Leonard - 28 February 8:08

There are three groups Nigel Farage and Ukip must win over: the settlers, the prospectors and the pioneers. Can he do it?

The Prime Minister can see the strategic as well as the economic logic.
Behind the gun-slinging sceptic act, Cameron is a good European. Will he dare show it in public?
By Rafael Behr - 27 February 1:04

The Prime Minister can see the strategic as well as the economic logic that keeps Britain in Europe.

After withdrawing from the centre-right European People's Party grouping.
Cameron only has himself to blame for the Tories' latest Europe row
By Nick Tyrone - 25 February 15:54

After withdrawing from the centre-right European People's Party grouping, Cameron has no right to tell his MEPs not to flirt with the anti-Euro Alternative für Deutschland.

The EU cannot afford a wait and see approach.
The western Balkans are in danger of sliding backwards
By David Clark - 24 February 10:50

The EU cannot afford a wait and see approach that creates the risk of economic divergence and renewed instability.

Yulia Tymoshenko in 2009. Photo: Getty
Ukrainian opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko released from prison
By New Statesman - 22 February 16:08

Ukrainian MPs have voted to oust President Yanukovych and hold early presidential elections on 25 May.

New Statesman
Ukraine is at war, we're just not admitting it yet
By Agata Pyzik - 20 February 10:56

Ukraine finds itself in an impossible clinch, where it is alternately patronised (“those heroic Ukrainians!”) and refused serious help to counter Russia’s bailouts. With people dying on the streets as the violence intensifies, how much longer can this last?

Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova of Pussy Riot
Pussy Riot and the new age of dissident art
By Daniel Trilling - 19 February 9:50

Neither of these two new books about the feminist art collective leave one optimistic about the immediate future of Russian politics, but they show the deep effect the saga has had.

Front-line journalist: Chornovol is still recovering from her attack.
No chickening out for activists subject to intimidation in Kiev
By Lucy Ash - 18 February 14:23

“I don’t hide behind the title ‘journalist’ any more,” says Tetiana Chornovol. “My investigative reporting is just one of the weapons I use in my battle against Yanukovych and his clan.”

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina, members of Pussy Riot
Two members of Pussy Riot arrested in Sochi
By Julia Ioffe - 18 February 13:41

Nadia Tolokonnikova and Masha Alyokhina, who were released from prison less than two months ago, say they were arrested in Sochi with a group of activists and journalists.

Belgium extends its euthanasia laws to children
By Sophie McBain - 14 February 11:55

Belgium has lifted all age restrictions on euthanasia, despite concerns that the legislation has been rushed through.

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