A woman pushes her bicycle past a non-exploded rocket in Ilovaisk, 50km southeast of Donetsk, 4 September. Photo: Getty
When one mistake can lead to catastrophe: what next for Ukraine?
By David Patrikarakos - 04 September 16:56

A ceasefire has been agreed but it remains in doubt whether Russia plans to conquer eastern Ukraine or establish a quasi-autonomous state there. 

French President François Hollande. Photo: Getty
Where has the French Left gone?
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 03 September 12:09

The recent dissolution of the government reflects the increasing pressure on Hollande to turn around a dire economic outlook.

Putin is in international disgrace - the west must make him feel it
Any financial loss to Britain mustn’t obscure the aim of sanctions on Russia
By Robert Macquarie - 04 August 13:19

The cost of recent economic sanctions will be felt in the west, but it’s a cost we can – and should – withstand. 

Cameron's crackdown on migrant benefits is too little, too late to help him
By Lucy Fisher - 31 July 16:38

Has the government's series of changes to European rules been too slow, and too limited, to convince the public that Britain should remain in the EU?

An armed separatist guards in front of wagons containing the remains of victims from the downed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, at a railway station in the eastern Ukrainian town of Torez on July 21, 2014. Photo: Getty
If you lived in Russia, this is what you’d believe about the crash of MH17
By Julia Ioffe - 21 July 15:47

The Kremlin’s propaganda pushing support for the separatists in eastern Ukraine has been so effective that the Russian people have a completely different understanding of the downing of MH17 – and even Putin may be unable to hold back the jingoism.

Airport groundstaff walk past Malaysia Airlines planes parked on the tarmac at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang on June 17, 2014. Photo: Getty Images
Malaysia Airlines passenger jet crashes in eastern Ukraine
By Ian Steadman - 17 July 18:23

Airliner crashes with 298 people on board.

A woman dressed up as Zwarte Piet. Photo: Getty.
A Dutch court has ruled that “Black Pete” is offensive. How did it take so long?
By Sophie McBain - 04 July 12:39

A Dutch court has ruled that the Dutch Christmas character, "Zwarte Piet" or Black Pete, a white man in blackface, is offensive.

Nicolas Sarkozy appears on television to protest his innocence. Photo: Getty
Nicolas Sarkozy may recover from his latest scandal, but the political class will not be so lucky
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 03 July 16:42

Whatever the outcome of the ongoing corruption investigations, the damage done to trust in public officials will be long-lasting.

Slow-burn revolutionary: Princip in prison. Photo: Getty
Gavrilo Princip: the assassin who triggered the First World War
By Tim Butcher - 03 July 10:00

Princip was a slow-burn revolutionary, identifying himself with all Bosnians and committing himself to the ideal of winning freedom for all local Bosnians, not just local Serbs.

Sightless witness: British troops blinded by mustard gas in the German spring offensive. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty
Simon Heffer: First World War, the battle of the historians
By Simon Heffer - 03 July 10:00

From almost the opening shot, the Great War has been fought over by historians wishing to interpret and understand what happened and why. Their conflict is not over yet.

Algeria fans supporting their team in Marseilles. Photo: Getty
New attacks on French-Algerian citizens resurrect old, subtle forms of racism
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 02 July 16:56

The World Cup is just the latest political football to be kicked by the Front National’s Marine Le Pen, who suggested that “You are either French or Algerian”.

Europe is not just another geopolitical power block. Photo: Getty
Slavoj Žižek: Only a radicalised left can save Europe
By Slavoj Zizek - 25 June 16:32

Austerity is not “too radical”, as some leftist critics claim, but, on the contrary, too superficial, an act of avoiding the true roots of the crisis, says Slavoj Žižek.

David Cameron
Cameron's tough stance on Juncker: who's it for?
By Lucy Fisher - 25 June 10:10

The Prime Minister's hardline attitude is now more about impressing British voters than winning the battle over the top EU post. 

Waiting game: Crown Prince Felipe at an award ceremony on 4 June. Photo: Getty
Can the Spanish monarchy survive without King Juan Carlos?
By Jason Webster - 12 June 10:00

His successor, Crown Prince Felipe, faces many challenges: the growth of republicanism, lessening support for the main political parties and the ongoing moves by Catalonia to become independent.  

Out in front: Marine Le Pen, leader of France's Front National.
Rage against the machine: the rise of anti-politics across Europe
By Mark Leonard - 05 June 10:00

Two groups of voters turned out in disproportionate numbers: urban voters from former industrial heartlands and rural voters put off by the liberal values being adopted by mainstream parties. Can politicians ever win back their trust?

It’s time for a European presidential election
By Jonn Elledge - 03 June 10:59

A Luxembourger you’ve never heard of thinks you elected him president. It’s just possible that the system isn’t working.

Juan Carlos I in Mallorca in 2011. Photo: Getty
Can Spain's monarchy survive the abdication of Juan Carlos I?
By Fernando Rosell-Aguilar - 03 June 10:14

The smooth succession from father to son was put in doubt after thousands of people took to the streets to call for a referendum on the future of the monarchy.

A Ukip bumper sticker. Photo: Getty
How do I tell my daughter that people across Europe fear minorities like us?
By Mehdi Hasan - 28 May 12:51

Anti-Semitism is now taboo in mainstream political discourse in a way in which Islamophobia isn’t.

Phoenix night: Conchita Wurst holds her trophy aloft after winning Eurovision 2014: Photo: © Andres Putting (EBU)
Eurovision: A continent divided in sexual attitudes – or perhaps not?
By Alan Renwick - 12 May 12:49

Anti-gay petitions ahead of the contest suggested eastern countries would give winner Conchita Wurst nul points. But while their juries’ votes reflected this, public votes were encouragingly pro-Wurst. 

Battle of balaclava: a masked pro-Russian militant is pictured after some 300 militants stormed the prosecutor's office in Donetsk on 1 May. Photo: Getty
“An uneasy monotony, punctuated by violence, dominates eastern Ukraine”
By David Patrikarakos - 08 May 10:00

David Patrikarakos reports on the worsening crisis in eastern Ukraine, where pro-Russian forces are defiant.

A priest blesses cakes and painted eggs for Orthodox Easter in the village of Semurovtsy, Belarus, 19 April. Photo: Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images
Belarus is now at risk of losing its independence to Russia
By Charles Grant - 30 April 10:00

Most Belarusians have a somewhat weaker sense of identity than Ukrainians but they feel Belarusian rather than Russian.

Venice seen from the air. Photo: Getty
All is not what it seems with Venice’s separatist vote
By Anna Cento Bull - 22 April 11:20

A flash in the pan, or the start of something big?

Ukrainian extremists will only triumph if Russia invades
By Timothy Snyder - 17 April 15:51

Ukraine has no future without Europe, but Europe also has no future without Ukraine.

A pro-Russian activist holds an icon in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk, 9 April. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, the protesters wait for Russia to take charge
By David Patrikarakos - 17 April 10:00

Standing in front of the barricades, two pensioners held up a banner with “For ever with Russia” emblazoned across it. The sentiment was uniform and unambiguous.

Hungary’s cold war with polio
By Penny Bailey - 15 April 10:17

Trapped by the Cold War and scarred after a failed revolution, Hungary fought one of its greatest battles against polio.

Would shorter working hours boost productivity? Photo: Getty.
Why we should all be working less
By Sophie McBain - 10 April 13:18

France has introduced a new law to prevent employees being asked to read work emails outside office hours. Would it help solve the UK's productivity problem if we followed suit?

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
Why is Europe failing to protect its Roma population from hate crimes?
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 April 17:31

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

Pro-Russian activists guard a barricade at the Ukrainian regional Security Service building in Donetsk. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, protestors are chanting “New Russia” – an old term that’s back in fashion
By Linda Kinstler - 08 April 9:22

Separatists in Donetsk and elsewhere are harking back to the 18th century territory of Novorossiya, as Moscow seems to be making moves to federalise Ukraine.

Franz Alekseyevich Roubaud's panoramic painting The Siege of Sevastopol (1854-55) shows the Charge of the Light Brigade. (Image: Bridgeman Art Library)
Defend the west: is it time to re-arm?
By Brendan Simms - 03 April 11:00

Europe should not underestimate the Russian threat, argues historian and professor of international relations Brendan Simms. We must show how seriously we take Putin’s assault on Ukraine by working towards unification and moral and military rearmament.

Nigel Farage and Nick Clegg during first of the two debates on Europe. Photo: Getty
Why does Nigel Farage want us to follow the lead of countries that are smaller than Bristol?
By Mehdi Hasan - 03 April 9:17

Eurosceptics harp on about the need for democracy. But the Swiss, like the Norwegians and the Icelanders, choose to eat food from a table at which they have no seat.

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