North Koreans stand onboard a ship in the Yalu River in Sinuiji
Sailing for North Korea: A voyage to the town where no one knows the Beatles
By Fraser Lewry - 19 February 9:20

The Chinese have always made the crossing: historically for trade, more recently for tourism. In May 2013, the North Korean city of Sinuiju opened up to westerners for the first time.

“Good” and “bad” war – and the struggle of memory against forgetting
By John Pilger - 13 February 15:02

The regime that Washington created in the South, the “good” Korea, was set up and run largely by those who had collaborated with Japan and America.

The loneliness of Vladimir Putin
By Julia Ioffe - 05 February 12:19

He crushed his opposition and has nothing to show for it but a country that's falling apart.

A new law in Afghanistan means men can attack their wives and daughters with impunity
By Sophie McBain - 05 February 11:55

The problem isn't just in Afghanistan. 30 per cent of woman suffer violence from an intimate partner, but globally laws do little to protect women at home.

What use is Gross Domestic Happiness to Bhutan's 106,000 global refugees?
By Prajwal Parajuly - 05 February 9:30

In Aberdeen, outside a takeaway called The Gurkha Kitchen, I met a Bhutanese refugee called Landless. Landless was eager to talk.

Why is the media so easily taken in by stories about North Korea?
By Nelson Jones - 06 January 15:38

It now appears that the story about Kim Jong-Un's uncle being executed by a pack of 120 ravenous dogs can be traced back to a Weibo post by a Chinese satirist.

Why India is sitting on a social time-bomb of violence against women
By Sunny Hundal - 16 December 10:11

There are 37 million more men than women in India, and most of them are of marriageable age given the relatively young population. A social time-bomb is now setting off there with terrifying consequences, and until the gang-rape in Dehli a year ago, very

New Statesman
How Lufsig the cuddly wolf became a Hong Kong protest symbol
By Sophie McBain - 10 December 15:34

A short lesson in the art of mistranslating names into Chinese.

New Statesman
What it's like to be a living goddess
By Sophie McBain - 28 November 17:01

A Kumari, or living goddess, in Nepal, has spoken out about what it's like to be worshiped and then return to life as a mere mortal.

New Statesman
Why is China destroying barbecues?
By Sophie McBain - 27 November 14:08

Air pollution is killing millions, and the government has responded by confiscating 500 illegal barbecues.

Why is China such fertile ground for young, ambitious Brits?
By Lu-Hai Liang - 20 November 17:01

Young British people are choosing to emigrate to China, armed with strategies for chasing success. Why?

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Il with South Korean president Roh Moo-Hyun
How to live to 120, according to Kim Jong-Il
By Sophie McBain - 20 November 13:03

Regular blood transfusions and five-year-olds doing "adorable" things aimed to help the North Korean dictator become the world's oldest man.

Is China's "Singles Day" the Loneliest Day of All?
By Christopher Beam - 20 November 11:13

Most Chinese people go looking for sales. Christopher Beam went looking for love.

Myanmar: the new Asian investment frontier
By Sara Perria - 01 November 11:45

MasterCard and Visa have already entered the country, together with multinationals such as Nestle, CocaCola, Uniliver, Total and Suzuki.

Shinzo Abe.
Japan's Thatcher: Meet the man determined to end the "lost decades"
By David Pilling - 24 October 13:38

Shinzo Abe’s first, brief premiership ended in disaster. Yet now, recovered from debilitating illness, the conservative nationalist is back in power and, emboldened by “Abenomics”, is determined to revitalise Japan after many years of decline.

New Statesman
Why have 94 per cent of Bangladesh factory collapse victims received no compensation?
By Sophie McBain - 24 October 12:24

Six months on from the disaster that killed over 1,100 workers, Primark is the only brand to have offered victims compensation.

New Statesman
Amnesty International: US may be guilty of war crimes in Pakistan
By Sophie McBain - 22 October 12:00

Several reports released this week are adding pressure on the US to disclose information about its deadly drone programme and civilian casualties.

New Statesman
Ski lifts, cognac and human rights in North Korea
By Sophie McBain - 09 October 11:34

Does North Korea's anger at Switzerland's refusal to supply ski lifts for the country's first luxury ski resort suggest that stricter sanctions could work?

New Statesman
The Delhi gang rape death sentences won't make India safer for women
By Monisha Rajesh - 30 September 12:35

The government has done little more than to satisfy the emotional sense of injustice, and hush up the masses temporarily while shying away from the bigger issue: how to prevent the crimes?

New Statesman
Panda diplomats: can you put a price on cuteness?
By Sophie McBain - 25 September 10:51

How China uses pandas to help secure long-term trade deals.

"Skirts are a leading cause of rape. Because men have eyes"
By New Statesman - 24 September 10:04

Comedy group All India Backods parody the belief that women must be to blame for rising amounts of rape in India.

What mooncakes in China can tell you about corruption and the environment
By Sophie McBain - 20 September 11:27

The Chinese tradition of giving away mooncakes in mid-autumn is surprisingly revealing.

New Statesman
A quarter of men in Asia-Pacific admit rape
By Sophie McBain - 10 September 10:14

A UN survey of 10,000 men in Asia-Pacific reveals high levels of sexual violence in the region, and asks why rape is so common.

The many faces of India
By Asiya Islam - 30 August 15:41

The idea that India is "the rape capital of the world" needs to be challenged but without refusing women's experience of fear and violence.

India has to make the fight against rape something that cannot be ignored
By Monisha Rajesh - 29 August 15:19

Every time a high-profile rape case occurs in India, there is shock, outrage and protests, but nothing actually changes.

A to B: Cars like tanks
By Samira Shackle - 21 August 12:15

Travel through Pakistan is intimately segregated by class, writes Samira Shackle. If you're rich, you just keep driving.

The Twitter jihadis: how terror groups have turned to social media
By Samira Shackle - 15 August 8:45

Pakistan’s militant and extremist organisations are increasingly aware of the importance of the internet, says Samira Shackle.

A view of Canton (Guangzhou) after an aerial attack in the war
China and Japan: the struggle for supremacy in the East China Sea
By Rana Mitter - 04 August 9:59

History and politics are coming together in a potentially toxic fashion in the East China Sea as China, motivated by memories of Japanese wartime atrocities, agitates for dominance in the region.

A Pakistani health worker administers polio vaccine drops to a young child
The struggle for a Polio-free Pakistan
By Samira Shackle - 25 June 12:22

What is behind the the sudden upsurge of violence towards polio vaccinators in Pakistan?

Would you swim in China's rivers?
By Sam Geall - 24 June 12:15

A burgeoning popular interest in China's ecological problems has led to citizens trying to win greater oversight of environmental decision-making.

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