Truth to power: Arvind Kejriwal campaigning in Delhi in early April. Photo: Hindustan Times via Getty
Taxman with the common touch: Arvind Kejriwal of India’s Aam Aadmi Party
By Priya Virmani - 17 April 10:00

The AAP’s leader looks like a cross between Gandhi and Charlie Chaplin and has an unwavering, energetic commitment to his cause.

India’s Supreme Court recognises a third gender
By Sophie McBain - 16 April 11:37

The Supreme Court in India has issued a new law allowing transgender people to change their gender on official documents to reflect their gender identity – why are so many European countries still several steps behind?

Statues in the ruins of Angkor Wat, photographed in 1952. Photo by Baron/Getty Images
Finding Pol Pot’s lost love
By Peter Fröberg Idling - 28 March 13:21

For most of his thirties, Cambodia's brutal dictator worked as a French teacher in Phnom Penh and his students adored him.

The arrivals board at Beijing International Airport on 8 March lists Flight MH370 as cancelled. Photo: Getty
The lost passengers of Flight MH370: why the modern world can’t cope with missing people
By India Ross - 25 March 11:09

In a world where we expect everyone to be accounted for, missing people enter into the realm of fiction.

Relatives of passengers aboard Flight MH370 wait in vain for news. (Photo: Getty)
Coping with the trauma of missing flight MH370
By Amanda Harris - 18 March 17:11

While the world searches for the plane or theorises about its disappearance, what about the effects on the desperate families and friends waiting for news – and even us?

Baidu's suggested search feature is very revealing.
What Baidu’s search autofill reveals about the soul of the average Chinese web surfer
By Christopher Beam - 14 March 12:54

“What do I do if I'm ugly?”, and other questions.

Women observe the festival of Rishi Panchami in Kathmandu. Photo: Poulomi Basu/WaterAid
What is life like when your period means you are shunned by society?
By Rose George - 11 March 10:00

How can you cope when having your period puts your health at risk? Rose George reports from Nepal and Bangladesh on menstrual taboos.

China’s billionaire politicians quadruple their wealth
By Sophie McBain - 06 March 12:16

Despite their low official government salaries, at this week’s National People’s Congress annual meeting, there will be 86 renminbi billionaires and China’s richest politicians have quadrupled their wealth in the past eight years. But is there a right level to set politicians’ pay?

The President of Kazakhstan suggests his country should be renamed
By Sophie McBain - 21 February 12:06

President Nazerbayev doesn't want to rule a "stan" any more. So he's suggesting it become Kazakh Yeli or Kazakhiya.

North Koreans stand onboard a ship in the Yalu River in Sinuiji
Sailing for North Korea: A voyage to the town where no one knows the Beatles
By Fraser Lewry - 19 February 9:20

The Chinese have always made the crossing: historically for trade, more recently for tourism. In May 2013, the North Korean city of Sinuiju opened up to westerners for the first time.

“Good” and “bad” war – and the struggle of memory against forgetting
By John Pilger - 13 February 15:02

The regime that Washington created in the South, the “good” Korea, was set up and run largely by those who had collaborated with Japan and America.

The loneliness of Vladimir Putin
By Julia Ioffe - 05 February 12:19

He crushed his opposition and has nothing to show for it but a country that's falling apart.

A new law in Afghanistan means men can attack their wives and daughters with impunity
By Sophie McBain - 05 February 11:55

The problem isn't just in Afghanistan. 30 per cent of woman suffer violence from an intimate partner, but globally laws do little to protect women at home.

What use is Gross Domestic Happiness to Bhutan's 106,000 global refugees?
By Prajwal Parajuly - 05 February 9:30

In Aberdeen, outside a takeaway called The Gurkha Kitchen, I met a Bhutanese refugee called Landless. Landless was eager to talk.

Why is the media so easily taken in by stories about North Korea?
By Nelson Jones - 06 January 15:38

It now appears that the story about Kim Jong-Un's uncle being executed by a pack of 120 ravenous dogs can be traced back to a Weibo post by a Chinese satirist.

Why India is sitting on a social time-bomb of violence against women
By Sunny Hundal - 16 December 10:11

There are 37 million more men than women in India, and most of them are of marriageable age given the relatively young population. A social time-bomb is now setting off there with terrifying consequences, and until the gang-rape in Dehli a year ago, very

New Statesman
How Lufsig the cuddly wolf became a Hong Kong protest symbol
By Sophie McBain - 10 December 15:34

A short lesson in the art of mistranslating names into Chinese.

New Statesman
What it's like to be a living goddess
By Sophie McBain - 28 November 17:01

A Kumari, or living goddess, in Nepal, has spoken out about what it's like to be worshiped and then return to life as a mere mortal.

New Statesman
Why is China destroying barbecues?
By Sophie McBain - 27 November 14:08

Air pollution is killing millions, and the government has responded by confiscating 500 illegal barbecues.

Why is China such fertile ground for young, ambitious Brits?
By Lu-Hai Liang - 20 November 17:01

Young British people are choosing to emigrate to China, armed with strategies for chasing success. Why?

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Il with South Korean president Roh Moo-Hyun
How to live to 120, according to Kim Jong-Il
By Sophie McBain - 20 November 13:03

Regular blood transfusions and five-year-olds doing "adorable" things aimed to help the North Korean dictator become the world's oldest man.

Is China's "Singles Day" the Loneliest Day of All?
By Christopher Beam - 20 November 11:13

Most Chinese people go looking for sales. Christopher Beam went looking for love.

Myanmar: the new Asian investment frontier
By Sara Perria - 01 November 11:45

MasterCard and Visa have already entered the country, together with multinationals such as Nestle, CocaCola, Uniliver, Total and Suzuki.

Shinzo Abe.
Japan's Thatcher: Meet the man determined to end the "lost decades"
By David Pilling - 24 October 13:38

Shinzo Abe’s first, brief premiership ended in disaster. Yet now, recovered from debilitating illness, the conservative nationalist is back in power and, emboldened by “Abenomics”, is determined to revitalise Japan after many years of decline.

New Statesman
Why have 94 per cent of Bangladesh factory collapse victims received no compensation?
By Sophie McBain - 24 October 12:24

Six months on from the disaster that killed over 1,100 workers, Primark is the only brand to have offered victims compensation.

New Statesman
Amnesty International: US may be guilty of war crimes in Pakistan
By Sophie McBain - 22 October 12:00

Several reports released this week are adding pressure on the US to disclose information about its deadly drone programme and civilian casualties.

New Statesman
Ski lifts, cognac and human rights in North Korea
By Sophie McBain - 09 October 11:34

Does North Korea's anger at Switzerland's refusal to supply ski lifts for the country's first luxury ski resort suggest that stricter sanctions could work?

New Statesman
The Delhi gang rape death sentences won't make India safer for women
By Monisha Rajesh - 30 September 12:35

The government has done little more than to satisfy the emotional sense of injustice, and hush up the masses temporarily while shying away from the bigger issue: how to prevent the crimes?

New Statesman
Panda diplomats: can you put a price on cuteness?
By Sophie McBain - 25 September 10:51

How China uses pandas to help secure long-term trade deals.

"Skirts are a leading cause of rape. Because men have eyes"
By New Statesman - 24 September 10:04

Comedy group All India Backods parody the belief that women must be to blame for rising amounts of rape in India.

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