Richard Dadd’s Halt in the Desert. Image: British Museum
The dangerous mind of Richard Dadd
By Michael Prodger - 02 July 9:35

Richard Dadd painted some dazzling visions abroad but found peace within the walls of Broadmoor.

Blood and honour: The Duel After the Masquerade (1857-59) by Jean-Léon Gérôme. Picture: © Walter Art Museum, Baltimore
Why are there so many duels in literature?
By John Mullan - 25 June 15:15

John Leigh's Touché: the Duel in Literature wears its learning lightly.

Ali Smith: Looking at the world through the eyes of Barbara Hepworth
By Ali Smith - 22 June 17:18

Barbara Hepworth’s work and its universe of meaning.

Windows on the sole: why we buy shoes we’re never going to wear
By Jane Shilling - 11 June 8:39

As Shoes: Pleasure and Pain opens at London’s V&A, Jane Shilling explores why our footwear carries such emotional weight.

The art of rapprochement: what the Havana Biennale reveals about thawing Cuba-US relations
By Rick Jones - 01 June 16:39

How symbolism and happiness are captured in joint American-Cuban cultural endeavours.

In the Frame: The Satirist
By Tom Humberstone - 29 May 9:00

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Object lessons: Learning, a 1996 artwork by Michael Craig-Martin. Photo: ©2015 MICHAEL CRAIG- MARTIN
Art rarely floats free of biography - or autobiography, for that matter
By Michael Prodger - 28 May 13:14

Michael Prodger on new books from Julian Barnes and Michael Craig-Martin.

In the Frame: Seriously?
By Tom Humberstone - 22 May 9:02

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

A glimpse of Grayson Perry's House for Essex. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Grayson Perry’s new house is a dollop of architectural fun
By Michael Prodger - 21 May 10:48

Cult figure Grayson Perry has won over the locals with his eccentric House for Essex.

In the Frame: Welcome to the Next Five Years of Your Life
By Tom Humberstone - 15 May 16:53

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Under the red sky: Chiharu Shiota’s installation The Key in the Hand. Photo: AWAKENING/GETTY IMAGES
In a Venice Biennale full of moving stories, the British appear to have nothing to say
By Michael Prodger - 14 May 13:41

With her monstrous phallus and pendulous balls, Britain's Sarah Lucas has sunk to the occasion. 

In the Frame: Farage Begins
By Tom Humberstone - 24 April 9:02

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Dirty money: an oil-like mess at Tate Britain during a protest in April 2011. Photo: Jeff Blacker/Rex Features
Biting the hand that funds: is the Tate losing out from its association with sponsors BP?
By Barbara Speed - 23 April 14:11

The Tate has vowed not to take money from the arms industry or tobacco firms - but the oil firm's support is just as contentious.

In the Frame: Game of Downing Street
By Tom Humberstone - 17 April 15:17

Tom Humberstone's weekly comic.

In the Frame: News Blocker
By Tom Humberstone - 10 April 11:14

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

“The sex industry is f***ing diabolical”: Artist Sam Roddick on the modern politics of sex
By Anoosh Chakelian - 30 March 16:59

The sex workers’ rights activist and artist calls on the government to protect the sex industry, as her new exhibition on objectification explores society's sexual failings.

In the Frame: The Grand Passive Aggressive Watergate Hotel
By Tom Humberstone - 27 March 12:13

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

In the Frame: Unlikely
By Tom Humberstone - 20 March 10:04

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

He wakes up kicking.
A masterful restoration pulls visitors deep into Goya's haunted thoughts
By Michael Prodger - 13 March 13:11

Goya is better known for his portraiture and group paintings. But a restoration of the artist's private notebooks show a different side, where ghosts and witches abound in profoundly unnerving sketches.

Gotcha! Steve Jobs speaks at an Apple music event in 2010. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
A modern history of hoaxes: without pranks, there'd be no Apple
By Robert Twigger - 11 March 17:30

From Bansky to Martin Bell, Kembrew McLeod's Pranksters: Making Mischief in the Modern World shows how pranks shake things up.

Beyond redemption. Photo: ANTONIO SCORZA/AFP/Getty Images
Our statues will outlast us – so let’s think twice before making any more naff public art
By Will Self - 11 March 12:44

From Achilles in London to Christ in Rio, public art sticks in cities' throats.

In the Frame: Old media kneels before new media
By Tom Humberstone - 06 March 10:29

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

How the impressionists found a new way of capturing the remarkable in everyday life
By Craig Raine - 05 March 11:51

Some think of the impressionists as the painterly equivalent of easy listening. Inventing Impressionism, themed around the collection of Paul Durand-Ruel, shows just how wrong they are.

Latitude 2014. Photo: Carys Lavin
Latitude Festival announces 2015 line-up: alt-J, Portishead, Noel Gallagher
By New Statesman - 03 March 12:03

The music and arts festival reveals this year's line-up.

Dress codes: can there be a productive relationship between politics and fashion?
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 02 March 11:36

Political fashion has never been straightforward.

Fast lives: Galliano (left), Mcqueen and friends. Photo: Rex images
The dark side of fashion: on the lives of Alexander McQueen and John Galliano
By Helen Lewis - 26 February 11:37

With the genius of fashion increasingly subsumed by the demands of mass commerce, it's hard not to implicate the industry in Galliano and McQueen's fates.

Turner’s Fighting Temeraire (1839). Photo: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images
What the strikes at the National Gallery tell us about Britain
By Tom Overton - 25 February 11:30

The National Gallery is a kind of visual phrasebook articulating awkward truths about our civic life.

Barbara Hepworth’s Reconstruction (1947). © BOWNESS, HEPWORTH ESTATE.
Britain can’t make it: a Hayward Gallery exhibition struggles to make sense of the past
By Michael Prodger - 19 February 12:34

History Is Now: 7 Artists Take on Britain is a confused hotch-potch of ideas.

"Let's go with Labour" (1964). Photo: People's History Museum
The People’s History Museum in Manchester is the most forthright museum I’ve ever visited
By Stephanie Boland - 17 February 12:02

A new exhibition, Election! Britain Votes, at the People’s History Museum in Manchester explores the nature of democracy in a candid and sincere fashion that is far removed from the complacency we often get when museums try and do politics.

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