New Statesman
The eagle interned as a Mossad agent, and other animal spies
By Sophie McBain - 19 September 16:55

Inside the bizarre world of animal espionage.

New Statesman
A quirk of Australian Prime Ministers
By Stephen Brasher - 19 September 13:40
All but one of Australia’s first 20 prime ministers have federal electoral divisions named after them. The first, Edmund Barton, a prime mover in federation, resigned after three years to become a high court judge.
 
Even in an age of “realists” and vigilantes, there is still cause for optimism
By John Pilger - 19 September 10:31

It's not too late for the world to learn the lesson of the US's foreign policy mistakes.

New Statesman
The unshakeable Angela Merkel, the pilot who weathered the storm
By Andrew Gimson - 19 September 8:07

As she faces re-election, the signs are that Angela Merkel’s commitment to the euro stretches only so far as the maths continue to work for Germany. Andrew Gimson on the roots of a genial but ruthlessly pragmatic politician.

New Statesman
What's so bad about fried chicken shops in Seoul and London?
By Sophie McBain - 18 September 10:54

Policy-makers in London and South Korea want to crack down on fried chicken shops, but for two very different reasons

New Statesman
The march that made Gandhi the Mahatma
By Martin Plaut - 17 September 13:33

One hundred years ago, Gandhi launched the decisive 1913 campaign that was to transform him into a figure of international stature. Later this year, we commemorate it.

New Statesman
How would Hezbollah respond to air strikes in Syria?
By Matthew Levitt - 17 September 9:35

While the US continues to deliberate their course of action, so, too, does Hezbollah. After depending upon the Syrian regime for so long, how will they retaliate in the event of air strikes?

New Statesman
We can’t script the outcomes of war
By Emile Simpson - 17 September 9:32

In seeking to break with a past tainted by Iraq, the Syria vote entrenches the legacy of that war. So what next?

New Statesman
A view on Syria from the US: Obama's enemies scent blood
By Nicholas Wapshott - 17 September 9:27

How did Obama find himself in such a rococo mess, pinned between haters in the House and his KGB rival?

A statue covered in plastic.
How Italians are keeping priceless artefacts out of private hands
By Daniel Trilling - 12 September 10:45

As the recession bites, state funding for Italy's museums and galleries has disappeared, and Italians are coming up with inventive forms of common ownership, to challenge power from the bottom up.

New Statesman
Brazil's protests have subsided - for now
By Claire Rigby - 12 September 10:35

The nationwide protests of the summer have mostly petered out, but Brazil's police and government still have a lot to answer for.

New Statesman
I was a fly on the wall in Assad’s office
By Uri Dromi - 12 September 10:21

If I were in Bashar al-Assad's office as Obama's speech at the White House was televised around the world, I think I would hear the following.

New Statesman
The divided town of Deir Ezzour is a microcosm of Syria’s bitter conflict
By Donatella Rovera - 12 September 7:49

As the threat of military intervention continues to loom over Syria, in a far-flung corner of the country, the town of Deir Ezzour offers an insight into the suffering of ordinary Syrians.

New Statesman
Will Syria be "another Iraq"?
By Sophie McBain - 09 September 13:10

Rhetoric aside, how does Syria today actually compare to Iraq in 2003?

From the Archive: Seamus Heaney on Ulster’s Troubles
By Seamus Heaney - 05 September 8:29

A piece by the future Nobel winner on the curious atmosphere in Ulster during the Troubles, first published in the <em>NS</em> of 1 July 1966.

Jeremy Bowen: Ice cream in Damascus
By Jeremy Bowen - 04 September 14:40

The central parts of Damascus feel more like a city at war than they did a year ago but physically the place is still almost untouched, finds the BBC's Middle East editor.

Meet the middle-aged women who are Britain's female sex tourists
By Julie Bindel - 29 August 7:40

When we picture a sex tourist, we usually think of a middle-aged man. But growing numbers of women are paying for a “holiday romance”.

New Statesman
Think of Boston, not Berlin
By David Cronin - 28 August 8:20

Ireland is second only to Greece in terms of the scale and speed of health cutbacks undertaken by “developed” countries.

A man climbs into his uncle's window.
Generation jobless: The worst youth unemployment crisis in European history should be blamed on its millionaires
By Danny Dorling - 22 August 11:00

At least 26 million unemployed people will be looking for work across Europe this summer, while in Britain, 2,400 bankers are earning over €1m a year - real pounds and euros that should be better spread out.

Riga.
In Latvia, Riga has become a ghost town
By Agata Pyzik - 22 August 10:10

The third-poorest country in the EU, Latvia punitive welfare conditions and the exclusion of Russian-speakers from surrounding nations has lead to a depopulation of 30,000 a year.

An unemployed mother with her children.
Jobless in Europe: The wretches of Spain
By George Eaton - 22 August 9:50

What kind of a social model is it that leaves half of young people out of work? George Eaton profiles Spain's employment woes.

What's fair about Private Manning's sentence?
By Lazarus Long - 22 August 9:32

Nicky Woolf is glad that there are still people such as Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning around.

West Bank.
John Kerry needs to understand day-to-day life in the West Bank is there is to be any hope of peace
By Nabila Ramdani - 22 August 8:00

The state of roads in the West Bank tells you everything you need to know about the possibility of Middle East peace, writes Nabila Ramdani.

A to B: Cars like tanks
By Samira Shackle - 21 August 12:15

Travel through Pakistan is intimately segregated by class, writes Samira Shackle. If you're rich, you just keep driving.

Putin's "war on gays" is a desperate search for scapegoats
By Michael Idov - 19 August 14:37

Russia is not a particularly homophobic culture, but its government is looking to divert attention from recent political discontent.

Egypt in crisis: "The body is evidence of the massacre, how can I put it in the ground?"
By Bel Trew - 16 August 12:22

Bel Trew goes inside the Cairo morgue where the bodies of Morsi supporters, massacred by the army, are waiting to be buried.

David Cameron and King Hamad.
The crackdown in Bahrain is an embarrassment for David Cameron
By David Wearing - 15 August 16:04

After David Cameron's recent meeting with King Hamad at Downing Street, the Bahrain authorities began a punitive clampdown on pro-democracy campaigners. Sooner or later, the PM's links with repressive Gulf states will come back to haunt him.

In Portugal: Requiem for O Manel
By Joo Dias - 15 August 9:00

Manuel Simões is being forced to close his 70-year-old family business, a restaurant on the outskirts of Lisbon. Since VAT rose for businesses like his, 75,000 jobs has disappeared from the industry.

Wax JFK.
Former NS editor John Freeman reacts to JFK's death: The man we trusted
By John Freeman - 15 August 8:50

29 November 1963: "The shock and the grief are universal and so great. Emotions have poured out - and they have gilded the truth."

A homeless man in Athens.
The death of a "freeloader": When will we accept the results of austerity?
By Yiannis Baboulias - 14 August 16:57

As an eighteen year old dies trying to flee a ticket inspector in Athens, police in Britain boast of apprehending a mother shoplifting to feed her two children. All across Europe, people are struggling to survive.

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