North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Il with South Korean president Roh Moo-Hyun
How to live to 120, according to Kim Jong-Il
By Sophie McBain - 20 November 13:03

Regular blood transfusions and five-year-olds doing "adorable" things aimed to help the North Korean dictator become the world's oldest man.

New Statesman
What happened when Egypt's government unveiled a monument to Tahrir Square protestors?
By Sophie McBain - 19 November 15:24

If the army was hoping that a hulking great monument would, literally and metaphorically, set their version of history in stone, they were wrong.

New Statesman
Why jokes are wearing thin in Egypt
By Sophie McBain - 14 November 13:54

Are Egypt’s most mischievous scribblers and joke-makers now retiring?

New Statesman
When is it too soon to dress up for Halloween as iconic murdered black teenager Trayvon Martin?
By Laurie Penny - 14 November 12:51

The entire globe is affected by how the social fabric of the world’s only superpower is threaded through with the kind of structural violence that allows black boys to be gunned down on the way to the grocery and their killers walk free.

David Cameron must act to hold the Sri Lankan government to account for its human rights abuses
By Douglas Alexander - 11 November 11:37

The PM has consistently failed to pressure the Rajapaksa government over its human right abuses. There is too much at stake, for too many, for him to fail to do so yet again.

New Statesman
Did the press comply with an HIV witch-hunt in Greece?
By Julie Tomlin - 07 November 13:13

State and private television networks went ahead and published women’s mugshots and personal details, labelling them “HIV-infected prostitutes”.

EU immigration policy is contributing to Sahara migrant deaths
By Sophie McBain - 01 November 15:12

Between 1998 and 2012, more than 16,000 people are known to have died attempting to migrate to the European Union.

200 teenage girls die in childbirth every day
By Sophie McBain - 30 October 10:44

Globally childbirth is one of the leading causes of death among teenage girls, according to a UN report calling for greater action against adolescent pregnancy.

New Statesman
Will the world's wine supplies run dry?
By Sophie McBain - 29 October 14:50

According to research released this month by Morgan Stanley, global wine production is decreasing, but we’re guzzling more and more of the stuff.

New Statesman
The controversies of Washington, DC: government shutdown and no more Redskins
By John Bew - 24 October 14:38

There is mounting evidence that the GOP’s hopes of taking the Senate in 2014, which seemed high a few months ago, are diminishing by the day.

Shinzo Abe.
Japan's Thatcher: Meet the man determined to end the "lost decades"
By David Pilling - 24 October 13:38

Shinzo Abe’s first, brief premiership ended in disaster. Yet now, recovered from debilitating illness, the conservative nationalist is back in power and, emboldened by “Abenomics”, is determined to revitalise Japan after many years of decline.

footprints in the snow.
The Maryville rape case: social media hurt Daisy Coleman - now it is helping her
By Holly Baxter - 19 October 10:06

Daisy Coleman is the latest in a series of girls to report that they were sexually assaulted and cyberbullied on social media. But we can't blame Twitter and Facebook for the existence of rape culture - and with #justice4daisy, they might have helped end

New Statesman
The Kremlin uses bully-boy tactics to keep other countries in the fold
By Charles Grant - 17 October 15:37

Putin and his ministers were uncharacteristically polite about Barack Obama, welcoming co-operation with him over Syria’s chemical weapons. Yet only a few weeks previously their relations with Washington had been toxic, with rows over Syria, Edward Snowde

New Statesman
Has the sun set on Golden Dawn?
By Yiannis Baboulias - 17 October 15:31

Whatever the crackdown against Golden Dawn means for Greece, the hope is now rekindled that the EU might be starting to see the rise of the far right as the threat that it is.

New Statesman
The choices in the Middle East are not between good and bad, but between bad and worse
By Uri Dromi - 17 October 15:25

A nuclear Iran will destabilise the Middle East and maybe push Saudi Arabia and other Sunni countries into a nuclear arms race. Oil supplies might be threatened. Yet Israel, though always capable of defending itself, shouldn’t be taking a seat in the firs

New Statesman
How Iran is coming in from the cold
By David Patrikarakos - 17 October 15:25

Israel calls Hassan Rowhani a “wolf in sheep’s clothing” – but is the new president of the Islamic Republic the west’s best hope of détente?

Afghan children.
The long goodbye to Afghanistan
By Alistair Bunkall - 17 October 15:20

Nad-e Ali's most senior politician, Mohammad Ibrahim, knows that the consequence of pushing too hard for change could be a Taliban resurgence. Striking this balance would be a challenge for a political veteran but Ibrahim is only 29 years old.

New Statesman
OPCW wins Nobel Peace Prize
By Holly Baxter - 11 October 10:18

Awarded the prize "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons".

Nelson Mandela
Indefinite delay: The last days of Nelson Mandela
By Hedley Twidle - 10 October 11:35

Throughout his life, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was recognised as a man of extraordinary self-possession, in strict control of his own image and physical presence.

New Statesman
The lessons for Europe two decades on from the war in Bosnia
By Robert Cooper - 10 October 11:19

For European countries, and for the United States, too, the shift from cold war to post-cold war had been too rapid for their thinking. Militarily their forces were still organised for a life-or-death struggle with the Warsaw Pact. Politically they could

New Statesman
What next for al-Shabab?
By Sophie McBain - 03 October 15:13

The decision to launch a terrorist attack abroad might reflect its inability to mount a successful offensive against African Union troops on the ground but it is also a mark of al-Shabab’s enduring strength.

New Statesman
Is Sub-Saharan Africa like Medieval Europe?
By Sophie McBain - 02 October 11:28

A new report suggests that African economies resemble those of Medieval Europe, and so hopes of sustained growth across the continent are unrealistic.

New Statesman
In Syria, doctors are dying before they can save lives
By Saleyha Ahsan - 02 October 8:59

Health care is being hampered by those involved in the conflict because of the Assad regime’s willingness to target doctors and hospitals.

Clinton with Doug Band.
Doug Band: Is this the man who could bring down Hillary Clinton?
By Alec MacGillis - 23 September 14:44

Doug Band came to the Clinton White House in 1995 - and was instrumental in creating the post-presidential philanthropic Clinton empire. Now he is striking out on his own, and causing all kinds of problems for Bill and Hillary.

New Statesman
What you need to know about al-Shabab
By Sophie McBain - 23 September 11:07

How the militant Somalia group behind the deadly attack on a Kenyan shopping centre formed, and why it is attacking foreign targets now.

What mooncakes in China can tell you about corruption and the environment
By Sophie McBain - 20 September 11:27

The Chinese tradition of giving away mooncakes in mid-autumn is surprisingly revealing.

New Statesman
The eagle interned as a Mossad agent, and other animal spies
By Sophie McBain - 19 September 16:55

Inside the bizarre world of animal espionage.

New Statesman
A quirk of Australian Prime Ministers
By Stephen Brasher - 19 September 13:40
All but one of Australia’s first 20 prime ministers have federal electoral divisions named after them. The first, Edmund Barton, a prime mover in federation, resigned after three years to become a high court judge.
 
Even in an age of “realists” and vigilantes, there is still cause for optimism
By John Pilger - 19 September 10:31

It's not too late for the world to learn the lesson of the US's foreign policy mistakes.

New Statesman
The unshakeable Angela Merkel, the pilot who weathered the storm
By Andrew Gimson - 19 September 8:07

As she faces re-election, the signs are that Angela Merkel’s commitment to the euro stretches only so far as the maths continue to work for Germany. Andrew Gimson on the roots of a genial but ruthlessly pragmatic politician.

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