A kitten and a gun, as posted on Instagram by a jihadi fighter with the hashtag #CatsOfJihad.
Why terrorists tweet about cats
By Ian Steadman - 18 June 13:09

It used to be that extremists used Facebook and YouTube to post recruiting videos - but Isis and its fighters have become adept at using social media to show their side of war.

Iraqi Shiite tribesmen in the south who have volunteered to fight. Photo: Getty
What is going to happen in Iraq?
By Isaac Chotiner - 17 June 13:08

It is not the assertiveness of new entities that is driving change, but the collapse of the old national constructions.

The rude intrusion of current affairs exposed the limitations of the summit. Photo: Foreign Office on Flickr
Is this the beginning of the end of the war on women’s bodies?
By Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi - 17 June 10:55

The recent summit in London has grabbed headlines, but whether we have now reached a turning point in the fight to end sexual violence in conflict remains to be seen.

Displaced Iraqi women arrive at a temporary camp in Aski Kalak in the north of the country. Photo: Getty
With Iraq, Obama was dealt a bad hand – and he’s playing it badly
By Jessica Schulberg - 16 June 12:57

The latest violence exposes the administration’s lack of vision for the broader Middle East.

Senator Elizabeth Warren in late 2013. Photo: Getty
Why Elizabeth Warren should take on Hillary Clinton and run for the US presidency
By Mehdi Hasan - 16 June 11:13

Simply by running, Warren will drag the centrist Clinton to the left and put the causes she cares about – financial reform, fairer taxes, income inequality – at the centre of the 2016 presidential election.

New face of justice: along with many black South Africans, Pumla Godobo-Madikizela thinks Eugene de Kock should be freed. Photo: Bloomberg
Should the apartheid regime’s “Prime Evil” be released?
By Eric Abraham - 13 June 12:33

Ten years ago psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela wrote a book about the encounters she had with Eugene de Kock, head of apartheid South Africa’s death squad, when in Pretoria prison. She thinks he should be pardoned. 

The UN special envoy Angelina Jolie speaking at the summit. Photo: Getty
The End Sexual Violence in Conflict summit is a chance to stop the female body being a battleground
By Aisha Gill - 12 June 15:21

International humanitarian law needs to include serious redress for those using rape as a method of conflict.

Waiting game: Crown Prince Felipe at an award ceremony on 4 June. Photo: Getty
Can the Spanish monarchy survive without King Juan Carlos?
By Jason Webster - 12 June 10:00

His successor, Crown Prince Felipe, faces many challenges: the growth of republicanism, lessening support for the main political parties and the ongoing moves by Catalonia to become independent.  

Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton at the 2012 State of the Union. Photo: Getty
What Hillary Clinton’s new book tells us about her unspoken pact with Barack Obama
By Noam Scheiber - 09 June 12:30

Clinton gets Obama’s donors and operatives, and in return Obama gets the Democratic nominee best able to make sure his accomplishments outlive his administration. What’s not to like?

Smoke drifts over grounded planes at Jinnah International Airport in Karachi after the attacks. Photo: Getty
For people in Karachi, the airport attacks show once more that fear has become a fact of life
By Samira Shackle - 09 June 10:05

It is mind-boggling that such an audacious attack should be possible in such a major airport in a major city. What does it say about the state of Karachi, and of Pakistan, that it was able to happen at all?

This week's summit must not be the culmination of the government's efforts.
We need to do go much further to end sexual violence in conflict
By Kerry McCarthy - 09 June 9:51

This week's summit must not be the culmination of the government's efforts.

An inmate peers from behind a wall as a guard walks by in the infamous Evin jail. Photo: Getty
For the Bahá'ís imprisoned in Iran, freedom and human rights seem remote
By Nazila Ghanea - 06 June 10:09

Seven Bahá'ís – members of Iran’s largest non-Muslim religious minority, persecuted by the government for decades – have now spent six years in prison for practising their religion.

Stuck in time: Hobart, Tasmania pictured in the 1950s. Photo: Getty
Tasmania, the island with a shameful past and a hopeful future
By Philip Hoare - 05 June 10:00

Australia’s timewarp island was the setting for atrocities against Aborigines in the 19th century and has a harsh treatment of asylum seekers today. Yet many see Australia as a liberal hope for the future. 

Out in front: Marine Le Pen, leader of France's Front National.
Rage against the machine: the rise of anti-politics across Europe
By Mark Leonard - 05 June 10:00

Two groups of voters turned out in disproportionate numbers: urban voters from former industrial heartlands and rural voters put off by the liberal values being adopted by mainstream parties. Can politicians ever win back their trust?

Tycoon tower: the 27-storey Antilia, Mumbai residence of Reliance Industries chairman Mukesh Ambani, has come to symbolise Indian wealth disparity. Photo: Getty
Slumdog billionaires: the rise of India’s tycoons
By James Crabtree - 05 June 10:00

New non-fiction books by the novelists Arundhati Roy and Rana Dasgupta examine India’s troubled relationship with capitalism and the blurred links between political and business elites. 

Pakistani protesters against honour killings. Photo: Getty
Enough is enough: Putting an end to “honour”-based violence against women and girls
By Aisha Gill - 04 June 10:12

After a shocking week of violence, "honour"-based crimes must be recognised for what they are – crimes against women created and fostered by a patriarchal society.

A protestor pleads with a People's Liberation Army officer not to attack students assembled in the square, 1989. Photograph: Peter Turnley/Corbis
Tiananmen’s hungry ghosts: 25 years on, the massacre still haunts modern China
By Isabel Hilton - 04 June 8:46

The events of 4 June 1989 continue to generate new crimes – the crime of remembering, and the crime of forgetting.

It’s time for a European presidential election
By Jonn Elledge - 03 June 10:59

A Luxembourger you’ve never heard of thinks you elected him president. It’s just possible that the system isn’t working.

Juan Carlos I in Mallorca in 2011. Photo: Getty
Can Spain's monarchy survive the abdication of Juan Carlos I?
By Fernando Rosell-Aguilar - 03 June 10:14

The smooth succession from father to son was put in doubt after thousands of people took to the streets to call for a referendum on the future of the monarchy.

Students taking part in a candlelight vigil at UC Santa Barbara. Photo: Getty
Laurie Penny on Elliot Rodger: Mental illness does not excuse violent misogyny
By Laurie Penny - 30 May 10:00

What does a rich, privileged young man have to do to get labelled a terrorist?

Violent response: a woman demonstrating against the Soma mining disaster flees riot police tear gas, 22 May. Photo: Getty
When safety gets privatised: Soma marks a new low for the Turkish government
By Alev Scott - 29 May 10:00

Despite Erdogan’s claims that the disaster was on a par with any other international mining accident in the world since 1862, Turkey’s rate of mining deaths is shocking. 

A placard from a 2008 human rights protest in Karachi, Pakistan. Photo: Getty
The stoning of Farzana P
By Bina Shah - 28 May 15:07

The death of a 25-year-old pregnant woman at the hands of her family was not an “honour killing”. It was murder.

A Ukip bumper sticker. Photo: Getty
How do I tell my daughter that people across Europe fear minorities like us?
By Mehdi Hasan - 28 May 12:51

Anti-Semitism is now taboo in mainstream political discourse in a way in which Islamophobia isn’t.

Activists have defied the ban on women driving in Saudi Arabia by getting behind the wheel. Photo: Getty
Is Saudi Arabia seeking friends?
By Burhan Al-Chalabi - 23 May 13:16

Saudi Arabia’s poor record on human rights and its treatment of women make it easy to demonise the kingdom.

Thai police stand guard outside a military compound before former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra arrives to report to Thailand's ruling military. Photo: Getty
Myths that have kept Thailand together now risk tearing it apart following military coup
By Matthew Phillips - 23 May 13:15

The danger now is that myth, not sense, will come to define Thai citizenship in the wake of the army’s latest intervention.

A rally in Abuja. Photo: Getty
Live-tweeting an Islamist insurgency
By Peter Guest - 23 May 12:55

With the eyes of the world on the Nigerian government, its main concern is to silence critical voices.

How the west embraced Chairman Mao’s Little Red Book
By John Gray - 23 May 12:30

At the peak of its popularity, Mao's bible was the most printed book in the world. It attained the status of a sacred, holy text during the Cultural Revolution, and retains its place among western devotees.

Flats and shacks on the outskirts of Cape Town. Photo: Getty
Fighting Cape Town’s notorious gangs
By Martin Plaut - 22 May 12:19

Martin Plaut meets the man taking on the gangs that are said to be responsible for 80 per cent of Cape Town’s crime.

A boy playing giant chess in Armenia's capital, Yerevan. Photo: Getty
A checkered history: why Armenia dominates the chess world
By Anoosh Chakelian - 21 May 14:36

Amid calls for the UK to embrace chess as an academic subject, chess enthusiasts look to Armenia, the Caucasian state that improbably dominates the chess world.

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