Islamic terrorist "Jihadi John". Image: BBC News screengrab
Islamic State terrorist “Jihadi John” identified as British man Mohammed Emwazi
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 26 February 11:55

Friends have identified the Islamic State member, who has beheaded several hostages, as Kuwaiti-born Mohammed Emwazi from West London.

Vegetables. Photo: Phil Walter/Getty Images
Han Kang's The Vegetarian: the failures of language and the mysteries of the physical
By Joanna Walsh - 26 February 11:03

Comparable to Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener” to Kafka’s “A Hunger Artist”, The Vegetarian ties social refusal to sexual protest.

The EU flag. Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Leader: The long shadow of decline: is Britain bowing out of the world stage?
By New Statesman - 26 February 9:11

This is no “conscious uncoupling” – the reason Britain’s voice isn't heard in Europe and beyond is, under Cameron, it has little to say. The challenge for Miliband is to show he can do better.

Isis fighters parade through Mosul in June 2014. Photo: Associated Press
John Simpson: Isis is losing in Iraq
By John Simpson - 25 February 9:48

The Iraqi city of Mosul was taken over by Islamic State last summer – but now the government forces are pushing back.

In defence of soft power: why a “war” on terror will never win
By Hamed El-Said - 24 February 14:36

The recent rise in global terrorism is alarming, but it also reaffirms the failure of our purely hard military approach to counter the phenomenon.

BME victims are at risk due to refuge closures. Photo: Getty
“Hierarchy of death”: cuts to refuges are putting black and ethnic minority women in danger
By Charlotte Lytton - 24 February 14:01

As the only refuge in Britain especially for Latin American women is under threat, it's time councils stopped treating women from ethnic minority backgrounds as a low priority.

An Austrian chocolate torte. Very European. Photo: Alexander Klein/AFP/Getty Images
An EU explainer for the easily bored: where does the UK stand?
By Frances Robinson - 24 February 13:11

Frances Robinson continues her series on what we really need to know about the EU. This week: should the UK stay or should it go?

A man walks past a polling station in Dublin. Photo: Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty
Why are fringe groups allowed the same air-time as LGBT activists in the run-up to Ireland’s marriage equality referendum?
By Paulie Doyle - 23 February 17:07

Under Irish broadcasting law, broadcasters cannot support marriage equality unopposed.

To ease Greece's burden would cost Europe little – and could prevent a eurozone collapse
By Vicky Pryce - 20 February 18:22

A refusal to acknowledge the democratic remit of the new, however irritating, Greek government could result in a contagion effect across the rest of the eurozone.

The Dominique Strauss-Kahn courtroom drama has put prostitution on trial
By Valeria Costa-Kostritsky - 20 February 11:48

The former IMF chief's pimping trial sees abolitionist views well-represented in the courtroom, but will sex workers be ignored?

Sameh Shoukry, Foreign Minister of Egypt attends a UN security council briefing on Libya in New York, January 2015. Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Image
Egypt’s long war against terror intensifies as Islamic State proves its military clout
By Sophie McBain - 19 February 14:56

A long, porous border with Libya puts Egypt at risk. Now it is even harder for president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to provide the security his mandate depends on.

Internally displaced Afghan children play cricket in a refugee camp. Photo: SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images
Afghanistan at the World Cup
By Tim Wigmore - 19 February 12:23

"Appreciation for Afghanistan’s cricketing achievements is perhaps the only thing that links the government with Taliban forces."

Contemporary omphalos? Dubai airport. Photo: Chris Jackson/Getty Images
Will Self: The night I was trapped in Dubai Airport
By Will Self - 19 February 12:21

The homogonisisng impulse of McDonald's leads to epiphany.

Civil war re-enactors at Gettysburg. Photo: John Moore/Getty Images
Laird Hunt's Neverhome: the civil war isn’t just something in America’s past
By Erica Wagner - 19 February 11:59

A novel of the American Civil War that combines realism with the powerful folklore surrounding defiant women.

People hold candles at a memorial in Copenhagen for those killed by the gunman. Photo: Asger Ladefoged/AFP/Getty
Leader: Europe and the new anti-Semitism
By New Statesman - 18 February 12:51

In recent months, there has been a series of fatal attacks by Islamist militants on Jewish people and institutions, as well as innumerable other instances of violence.

Inside the European Parliament in Strasbourg. Photo: Frederick Florin/AFP/GettyImages
An EU explainer for the easily bored: the institutions
By Frances Robinson - 17 February 12:00

In the first of a six-part series, Frances Robinson cuts through the election noise and tells you what you actually need to know about the bodies that make up the European Union.

Danish prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt lays flowers outside the synagogue Krystalgade in Copenhagen. Photo: Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty
Copenhagen shootings: PM says an attack on Jewish community is “an attack on all of Denmark”
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 16 February 12:08

Helle Thorning-Schmidt condemned the “cynical act of terror” against Denmark.

Women in Egypt mark the anniversary of the Arab Spring at a rally in Tahrir Square. Photo: Getty
Feminism has been hijacked by white middle-class women
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 13 February 16:23

To paraphrase bell hooks: there is little point making women equal to men when not all men are equal. 

Bashar al-Assad interview: Jeremy Bowen meets Syria’s great survivor
By Jeremy Bowen - 13 February 12:31

War has been raging in Syria for nearly four years and much of the country is in ruins, yet Bashar al-Assad is still in power. And the view from the presidential palace is brightening.

Leader of the AAP Arvind Kejriwal at a rally in Varanasi in May 2014. Photo: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images
What is behind the resurgence of the AAP, India’s radical anti-corruption movement?
By Samira Shackle - 13 February 9:30

The Aam Aadmi Party, led by Arvind Kejriwal, has won 67 out of 70 seats in Delhi’s elections.

Somali security forces keep vigil during the funeral of assassinated MP Abdullahi Qayad Barre in Mogadishu in February 2015. Photo: Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images
What has happened to the fight against Somalia’s al-Shabab?
By Martin Plaut - 12 February 17:14

The situation is murky, but it is certain that al-Shabab remains undefeated and is still a real threat, not just to Somalia, but to the region as a whole.

Abbott (L) and Turnbull (R) in 2009. Photo: Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images
The febrile world of Australian politics: Turnbull vs Abbott
By Peter Browne - 12 February 12:37

Following this month's failed backbench revolt against prime minister Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull's position is stronger than ever.

A worker installs a flag advertising the cup. Photo: A worker installs a flag for the cup. Photo: Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images
Letter from Equatorial Guinea: forget human rights – here comes the football
By Jonathan Wilson - 12 February 11:09

When Morocco withdrew from hosting the African Cup of Nations, citing Ebola fears, Equatorial Guinea stepped in. But at what cost?

The squeezed earth. Illustration: Jackson Rees
Will Self: We like to feel cosy in our happy little tribes – but it’s a big world, after all
By Will Self - 12 February 10:54

In my visual field alone there must have been 5,000 people suffering.

A Podemos rally in Madrid. Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images
Podemos goes pro: how the Spanish party are fine-tuning their election message
By Liam Aldous - 12 February 10:11

Much has changed since the protests of 2011. Now, last year's upstart party might just be in with a chance.

Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, her sister Razan, and husband Deah Shaddy Barakat. Photo: Facebook
The Chapel Hill shooting: White male atheist murders three Muslim students
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 11 February 14:51

46-year-old Craig Stephen Hicks has been arrested and charged.

David Cameron and Tony Abbott at the Australian War Memorial. Photo: Mark Nolan/Reuters
The rise of the Anglosphere: how the right dreamed up a new conservative world order
By Michael Kenny and Nick Pearce - 10 February 11:19

The Anglosphere has its roots in the Commonwealth tradition. But today's global world has forged a powerful unofficial alliance.

Rohingya children play by a relief tent at Bawdupah's Internally Displaced People camp on the outskirts of Sittwe. Photo: Soe Than Win/AFP/Getty Images
The Rohingya crisis in Burma has become “a protracted, squalid, stateless status-quo”
By Oliver Griffin - 06 February 14:56

The status of Burma’s Rohingya people has devolved to the point where even naming them has become controversial. We need to do more.

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