Wendy Davis during her 13-hour filibuster of an anti-abortion bill in the Texas state senate. Photo: Getty
Can Wendy Davis become the first Democratic governor of Texas in 20 years?
By Nicky Woolf - 03 April 14:48

Wendy Davis shot to fame in 2012 after her 13-hour filibuster to stop a particularly vicious anti-abortion bill. But can she convert that kind of recognition into victory in the race to be governor of Texas?

Franz Alekseyevich Roubaud's panoramic painting The Siege of Sevastopol (1854-55) shows the Charge of the Light Brigade. (Image: Bridgeman Art Library)
Defend the west: is it time to re-arm?
By Brendan Simms - 03 April 11:00

Europe should not underestimate the Russian threat, argues historian and professor of international relations Brendan Simms. We must show how seriously we take Putin’s assault on Ukraine by working towards unification and moral and military rearmament.

Nigel Farage and Nick Clegg during first of the two debates on Europe. Photo: Getty
Why does Nigel Farage want us to follow the lead of countries that are smaller than Bristol?
By Mehdi Hasan - 03 April 9:17

Eurosceptics harp on about the need for democracy. But the Swiss, like the Norwegians and the Icelanders, choose to eat food from a table at which they have no seat.

New-found confidence: Vladimir Putin at the Sochi Paralympics closing ceremony last month. (Photo: Getty)
Letter from Moscow: the mood turns nasty
By Angus Roxburgh - 01 April 14:01

In the wake of the Ukraine crisis a rampant chauvinism has been unleashed,  while sanctions on Russia have created the kind of atmosphere dictators love.

Victims of spite: acid attack survivors at an anti-violence rally in Dhaka. (Photo: Rex Features)
Acid attacks: a horrific crime on the increase worldwide
By Samira Shackle - 01 April 12:10

Around 1,500 cases are recorded every year but the real figure is probably far higher.

Anne Hidalgo's victory in Paris was a small consolation for the French left. Photograph: Getty.
French Socialists humiliated in local elections
By Raphael Gray - 31 March 14:41

Good news for Ukip, bad news for Labour.

Statues in the ruins of Angkor Wat, photographed in 1952. Photo by Baron/Getty Images
Finding Pol Pot’s lost love
By Peter Fröberg Idling - 28 March 13:21

For most of his thirties, Cambodia's brutal dictator worked as a French teacher in Phnom Penh and his students adored him.

A rousing speech on the dangers of Swedish nationalism is a bit of a turn-off. Photo: Getty
2am in a gay bar in Stockholm is the best time to discuss the NHS
By Eleanor Margolis - 28 March 11:35

If you’re a Scene Lesbian, whenever you’re abroad, you feel obligated to have a quick look at what gays do for fun wherever you are.

Tony Leon (r) shakes hands with Kgalema Motlanthe, then deputy leader of the ruling ANC, 2008. (Photo: Getty)
Tony Leon on South Africa: “Days after Mandela’s burial, the unity of the ANC was shattered”
By Tony Leon - 27 March 10:00

The former leader of South Africa’s Democratic Alliance talks about the fallout from Madiba’s death on the rainbow nation.

Russia's revenge: why the west will never understand the Kremlin
By Angus Roxburgh - 27 March 10:00

The events in Ukraine are Putin’s payback for what he considers to be a quarter-century of humiliation since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
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Why is Egypt sentencing hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood supporters to death?
By Sophie McBain - 25 March 11:18

Several Egyptian TV channels yesterday welcomed the sentencing to death of 529 Muslim Brotherhood supporters in a flawed two-day trial. Are Egyptians sleepwalking into one of the darkest chapters in their recent political history?

The arrivals board at Beijing International Airport on 8 March lists Flight MH370 as cancelled. Photo: Getty
The lost passengers of Flight MH370: why the modern world can’t cope with missing people
By India Ross - 25 March 11:09

In a world where we expect everyone to be accounted for, missing people enter into the realm of fiction.

Plot for Peace: the French businessman who helped end apartheid
By Sophie McBain - 25 March 9:46

A new documentary sheds light on the role played by Jean-Yves Ollivier, a secretive French businessman, in bringing peace to South Africa. But what does it tell us about the mechanics of conflict resolution?

Salimata Knight, an FGM survivor, in March 2004 at an event launching the Female Genital Mutilation Act. Photo: Getty
Why did the first prosecution for female genital mutilation take almost 30 years?
By Sarah Ditum - 24 March 11:03

The legislation outlawing FGM was introduced in 1985, but there were no prosecutions until last week. Why?

Citizens in Simferopol, Ukraine watch Putin on a laptop declaring Crimea part of Russia. (Photo: Getty)
Vlad the impatient: why timid western politics won’t wash with Putin
By Julian Evans - 20 March 10:00

The world waits to see how far the fire that has been lit by Russia’s invasion of Crimea will spread in Ukraine and elsewhere.

Binyavanga Wainaina (Photo: Phil Moore/Guardian)
Binyavanga Wainaina on coming out: “This is not going to be very good for my love life”
By Philip Maughan - 20 March 10:00

The fearless Kenyan writer talks about the “lost” coming-out chapter from his memoir and the response in Africa and elsewhere.

Why aren’t EU states delivering on their humanitarian aid pledges?
By Sophie McBain - 19 March 12:44

The EU is the world’s largest humanitarian donor, and it is facing a funding gap of almost half a billion euros.

Relatives of passengers aboard Flight MH370 wait in vain for news. (Photo: Getty)
Coping with the trauma of missing flight MH370
By Amanda Harris - 18 March 17:11

While the world searches for the plane or theorises about its disappearance, what about the effects on the desperate families and friends waiting for news – and even us?

A symbolic change.
Eurosceptics will do well in May, but the federalists will retain their grip
By Richard Mylles - 18 March 9:51

The parliamentary alliance between the the centre-right and the centre-left means the increase in the number of eurosceptic MEPs will have a largely symbolic effect.

Pro-Russia Crimeans celebrating in Sevastopol. Photo: Getty
The Crimea vote is awkward for the west – but it isn’t unprecedented
By James Dawson - 17 March 12:22

Would a free vote have gone in Russia’s favour anyway?

We are committed to making the EU work better for Britain.
How Labour will work for real change in Europe
By Douglas Alexander - 14 March 16:12

We need to boost Europe’s competitiveness, avoid a race to the bottom on skills and wages and ensure EU migrants contribute to our economy and our society.

Baidu's suggested search feature is very revealing.
What Baidu’s search autofill reveals about the soul of the average Chinese web surfer
By Christopher Beam - 14 March 12:54

“What do I do if I'm ugly?”, and other questions.

Moscow liberals are discovering that the ground has shifted beneath their feet since Putin came back to power in 2012. Photo: Getty
While the west watches Crimea, Putin is cracking down in Moscow
By Julia Ioffe - 14 March 12:06

There’s suddenly not much left of the independent media in Russia, even of what little of it there was left after Putin’s first two terms at the wheel.

Laura Bates of the Everyday Sexism project in the film “Shouting Back” by Dan Reed.
Everyday Sexism speech to the UN: “Sexism and sexual harassment is not a ‘women’s issue’ – it is a matter of human rights”
By Laura Bates - 13 March 14:45

To describe sexism, sexual harassment, and sexual violence as “women’s issues” side-lines and reduces them, neglects male victims and lets perpetrators off the hook. One in three women on the planet will be raped or beaten in her lifetime.

Women observe the festival of Rishi Panchami in Kathmandu. Photo: Poulomi Basu/WaterAid
What is life like when your period means you are shunned by society?
By Rose George - 11 March 10:00

How can you cope when having your period puts your health at risk? Rose George reports from Nepal and Bangladesh on menstrual taboos.

A Syrian greengrocer next to a bombed out building in the Shaar district of Aleppo, February 2014. Photo: Mohammed al-Khatieb/AFP/Getty Images
Jeremy Bowen: I know there’s trouble in the Middle East when I need my flak jacket, gas mask and Kevlar pants
By Jeremy Bowen - 07 March 17:00

The BBC’s Middle East editor on John Kerry striking the wrong tone over Ukraine, and remembering the Aleppo souks.

A surprising degree of consensus.
The main parties agree on the EU far more than they suggest
By Pawel Swidlicki - 07 March 14:47

Beyond the bluster and rhetoric, there is a surprising degree of consensus on the reforms needed.

Vladimir Putin by André Carrilho for the New Statesman
Leader: Why we need to be honest about Vladimir Putin
By New Statesman - 06 March 13:36

Whatever the Kremlin apologists say – and regardless of the ancient historical and cultural affinities involved – there are few benefits for citizens of Crimea likely to result from their de facto annexation by Russia.

Art regeneration: Viktor Hulik's 1997 street-level statue of "Cumil the Peeper" in Bratislava
Slovakia: life after the velvet divorce
By Angus Roxburgh - 06 March 10:00

Why the former Czechoslovakian state, which gained its “Velvet Divorce” from the Czech Republic in 1993, is one of Europe’s quiet successes.

A third of women in the EU have faced sexual or physical violence
By Sophie McBain - 05 March 15:10

Denmark, Sweden and Finland had the highest rates of violence against women, despite the countries' reputation for promoting gender equality. Why?

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