Thai police stand guard outside a military compound before former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra arrives to report to Thailand's ruling military. Photo: Getty
Myths that have kept Thailand together now risk tearing it apart following military coup
By Matthew Phillips - 23 May 13:15

The danger now is that myth, not sense, will come to define Thai citizenship in the wake of the army’s latest intervention.

A rally in Abuja. Photo: Getty
Live-tweeting an Islamist insurgency
By Peter Guest - 23 May 12:55

With the eyes of the world on the Nigerian government, its main concern is to silence critical voices.

How the west embraced Chairman Mao’s Little Red Book
By John Gray - 23 May 12:30

At the peak of its popularity, Mao's bible was the most printed book in the world. It attained the status of a sacred, holy text during the Cultural Revolution, and retains its place among western devotees.

Flats and shacks on the outskirts of Cape Town. Photo: Getty
Fighting Cape Town’s notorious gangs
By Martin Plaut - 22 May 12:19

Martin Plaut meets the man taking on the gangs that are said to be responsible for 80 per cent of Cape Town’s crime.

A boy playing giant chess in Armenia's capital, Yerevan. Photo: Getty
A checkered history: why Armenia dominates the chess world
By Anoosh Chakelian - 21 May 14:36

Amid calls for the UK to embrace chess as an academic subject, chess enthusiasts look to Armenia, the Caucasian state that improbably dominates the chess world.

Mourners gather during the funeral procession of Mahmud al-Sayed al-Dakruri on 20 May. Photo: Getty
By trying to control civil society, the Egyptian government could fuel more social unrest
By Adam Pickering - 21 May 10:27

The leaders in Egypt have repeatedly failed to recognise that the campaigning of not-for-profits plays an important role as a pressure gauge that can release dissent in a manageable way.

The flag of South Sudan was raised at the UN for the first time in July 2011. Photo: Getty
“This is one of the worst places in the world to be a woman”
By John Plastow - 21 May 10:06

Three years on from the signing of the peace agreement in South Sudan, the heady optimism has disappeared.

Saffron warriors: Modi waves to supporters on his way to file nomination papers in Varanasi. Photo: Getty
Narendra Modi: man of the masses
By William Dalrymple - 12 May 17:00

Modi, implicated in a massacre in 2002 while chief minister of Gujarat, has been elected as India’s new prime minister. Is he a dangerous neo-fascist, as some say, or the strongman reformer that this country of 1.2 billion people craves?

Phoenix night: Conchita Wurst holds her trophy aloft after winning Eurovision 2014: Photo: © Andres Putting (EBU)
Eurovision: A continent divided in sexual attitudes – or perhaps not?
By Alan Renwick - 12 May 12:49

Anti-gay petitions ahead of the contest suggested eastern countries would give winner Conchita Wurst nul points. But while their juries’ votes reflected this, public votes were encouragingly pro-Wurst. 

The mass death penalties and the wider crackdown on the opposition cannot be tolerated.
The UK must stand against Egypt's disregard of human rights
By Ian Lucas - 08 May 15:27

The mass death penalties and the wider crackdown on the opposition cannot be tolerated.

Battle of balaclava: a masked pro-Russian militant is pictured after some 300 militants stormed the prosecutor's office in Donetsk on 1 May. Photo: Getty
“An uneasy monotony, punctuated by violence, dominates eastern Ukraine”
By David Patrikarakos - 08 May 10:00

David Patrikarakos reports on the worsening crisis in eastern Ukraine, where pro-Russian forces are defiant.

Everyday terror: the bomb-making factory set up by 7/7 bombers in a council flat bedroom in Leeds. Photo: July 7 Inquests/PA
David Selbourne: The challenge of Islam
By David Selbourne - 08 May 10:00

The author was asked by John Kerry to write a briefing paper on the Islamist threat. He explains here what he told the US secretary of state and why he feels progressives have allowed themselves to be silenced by frightened self-censorship and the stifling of debate. Read Mona Siddiqui’s response to the piece, The Arabisation of Islam, here.

Muslim women and girls at a funfair during Eid ul-Fitr in Wanstead, north-east London. Photo: Matthew Lloyd/Getty
“The battle is among Muslims themselves – a battle for the very soul of Islam”
By Mona Siddiqui - 08 May 10:00

The British Muslim academic Mona Siddiqui writes about the “Arabisation” of Islam and changing attitudes to Muslims in the west.

Truce for now: Fatah's Azzam al-Ahmed celebrates with Hamas's PM in the Gaza Strip Ismail Haniya in Gaza City. 23 April. Photo: Getty
Israel-Palestine: this is the anti-peace process
By Dimi Reider - 07 May 17:00

If the Israeli government was at all committed to a two-state solution, it would have welcomed the agreement between the PLO and Hamas.

A woman smokes marijuana during the World Day for the Legalization of Marijuana in Colombia, 3 May 2014. Photo: RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images
Why the costly, pointless war on drugs must come to an end
By John Collins - 06 May 17:12

A new report from the London School of Economics lays out the case against the counter-productive decades-long attack on recreational drugs.

Narendra Modi addressing a rally in Sidhuali near Lucknow, India. Photo: Getty
We must not turn a blind eye to the election of Narendra Modi, India’s Milosevic
By Mehdi Hasan - 02 May 14:10

As a British citizen, I am ashamed that my government is willing to cosy up to standard-bearers of religious fascism – as long, it seems, as they aren’t Muslim.

A motorcycle taxi with four passengers in the CAR capital, Bangui. Photo: Getty
Hell is an understatement: a report from the bloody, crumbling Central African Republic
By Graeme Wood - 01 May 17:33

When looking for solutions to the horrors in the Central African Republic, one is tempted to say that any ideas that don’t start or end with genocide qualify as good ones.

Harvard to high office: Senator Elizabeth Warren, who heads the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Photo: Getty
Encounters in a Harvard canteen, Elizabeth Warren’s options and the charm of John McCain
By Douglas Alexander - 01 May 15:28

The shadow foreign secretary reports from a four-day trip to the States. 

World Bank Vice President for the Africa Region Obiageli Ezekwesili delivers a speech. Photo: Getty
Why is there such a culture of misinformation surrounding the case of Nigeria’s kidnapped girls?
By Emma Dabiri - 01 May 14:54

The tragedy of the two hundred girls kidnapped in Nigeria won’t be as high-profile a story as individual western kidnap victims – and the Nigerian authorities aren’t helping.

Everything you need to know about India’s elections
By Sophie McBain - 01 May 12:50

On 16 May we'll know the results of the world’s biggest-ever elections – with 814m Indians voting over six weeks. What’s at stake?

A priest blesses cakes and painted eggs for Orthodox Easter in the village of Semurovtsy, Belarus, 19 April. Photo: Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images
Belarus is now at risk of losing its independence to Russia
By Charles Grant - 30 April 10:00

Most Belarusians have a somewhat weaker sense of identity than Ukrainians but they feel Belarusian rather than Russian.

No way home: Syrian refugees sleeping outside the Centre for Temporary Stay of Immigrants (CETI), in Melilla, Spain, 2 April. Photo: Getty
“My heart aches for Syria. I don’t think people think about that”
By Samira Shackle - 29 April 9:40

While 2.6 million Syrians have fled the country, few have so far come to Britain. Yet the current anti-immigration climate ignores the desperate circumstances of those forced here.

Abuse of women domestic workers in Qatar exposes uncomfortable truths closer to home
By Sophie McBain - 23 April 13:42

A new report from Amnesty International describes how domestic workers in Qatar face abuse and exploitation. The problem isn't just limited to Qatar, however: domestic workers in the UK are similarly vulnerable.

The chained fist of the statue celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the US. Photo: Getty
Much of Britain's wealth is built on slavery. So why shouldn't it pay reparations?
By Priyamvada Gopal - 23 April 10:09

The benefits of slavery have accrued down the generations, so why are we so nervous about the responsibility for the slave trade doing the same?

Venice seen from the air. Photo: Getty
All is not what it seems with Venice’s separatist vote
By Anna Cento Bull - 22 April 11:20

A flash in the pan, or the start of something big?

Ukrainian extremists will only triumph if Russia invades
By Timothy Snyder - 17 April 15:51

Ukraine has no future without Europe, but Europe also has no future without Ukraine.

Oscar Pistorius in court. Photo: Getty
After Pistorius, South African media won't be the same again
By Anton Harber - 17 April 11:15

With cameras in court, new 24/7 news channels and no-holds-barred commentary on social media, the trial of Oscar Pistorius has shaken up the South African media.

James the evangelist: Jimmy Carter at home in Plains, Georgia
Jimmy Carter: “William Hague is a hero of mine”
By John Bew - 17 April 10:00

Our man in Washington John Bew has coffee with the former US president – and they talk Thatcher, Iran’s Islamic Revolution and the persecution of women.

Truth to power: Arvind Kejriwal campaigning in Delhi in early April. Photo: Hindustan Times via Getty
Taxman with the common touch: Arvind Kejriwal of India’s Aam Aadmi Party
By Priya Virmani - 17 April 10:00

The AAP’s leader looks like a cross between Gandhi and Charlie Chaplin and has an unwavering, energetic commitment to his cause.

A pro-Russian activist holds an icon in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk, 9 April. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, the protesters wait for Russia to take charge
By David Patrikarakos - 17 April 10:00

Standing in front of the barricades, two pensioners held up a banner with “For ever with Russia” emblazoned across it. The sentiment was uniform and unambiguous.

Pages