French police at the Jewish supermarket in Paris where several people were taken hostage.
Slavoj Žižek on the Charlie Hebdo massacre: Are the worst really full of passionate intensity?
By Slavoj Zizek - 10 January 21:31

How fragile the belief of an Islamist must be if he feels threatened by a stupid caricature in a weekly satirical newspaper, says the Slovenian philosopher.

French police officers stand guard outside Paris' main mosque as people enter for Friday prayers. Photo: Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images
Is the Charlie Hebdo attack really a struggle over European values?
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 09 January 13:07

By targeting the French magazine, the attackers were able to deepen already profound rifts in French society and establish an atmosphere ripe for the recruitment of alienated youths.

Charlie Hebdo suspects killed and several hostages freed in France
By New Statesman - 09 January 9:24

Coordinated assaults by the French police have killed the gunmen behind Wednesday's attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine, and a gunman holding hostages in a Jewish supermarket.

Charlie Hebdo is written near flowers and candles left at the Place de la Republique at midday in solidarity with victims of yesterday's terrorist attack on January 8, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo: Getty Images
Charlie Hebdo: what we know so far
By New Statesman - 08 January 18:20

Police in France are still tracking the three men responsible for killing 12 people yesterday at the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. Mass vigils are held around the world.

Ukranian forces on patrol near Sloviansk. Photo: Reuters/Gleb Garanich
Meet the ordinary Ukrainians arming the country against Russian separatists
By David Patrikarakos - 08 January 16:55

In Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists, civilians keep the army equipped.

Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Leader: A reckoning in the eurozone
By New Statesman - 08 January 16:31

Angela Merkel claims she no longer fears the "Grexit", but will the public be drawn to extreme means?

In cartoons: the global response to the attack on Charlie Hebdo
By Anoosh Chakelian - 08 January 14:32

How cartoonists around the world reacted to the murder of journalists and cartoonists at the French satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo.

The offices of Charlie Hebdo in 2012. Photo: Getty Images
Murderous outrage in Paris as Charlie Hebdo, the magazine that mocked Mohammed, is attacked
By New Statesman - 07 January 11:46

Reports have 12 killed at Paris offices by men with automatic rifles.

A South African flag flies in front of a portrait of Mao. Photo: Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images
Why is the ANC following the example of the Chinese Communist Party?
By Martin Plaut - 06 January 17:48

South Africa’s ruling party appears to be forging ever-closer ties with the Chinese government.

Margaret Thatcher in 1985 at the Conservative Party Conference in Blackpool. Photo: Getty Images
Declassified papers reveal Thatcher's mixed response to South Africa's bloody 1985
By Martin Plaut - 30 December 13:03

Government records made public by the 30 year rule reveal Margaret Thatcher's diplomatic struggle with apartheid South Africa - arguing against sanctions, but in favour of the release of Nelson Mandela - during a year of bloodshed and dialogue for the region.

Missing AirAsia flight QZ8501: what we know so far
By New Statesman - 28 December 10:05

Air traffic control has lost contact with a passenger plane flying from Indonesia to Singapore with 162 people on board.

Migrants prepare to cast off the beach at Shimbiro, Somalia, for a perilous journey across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen and beyond. Photo: Alixandra Fazina/N
The best of the NS in 2014: World Affairs
By New Statesman - 23 December 19:20

Our best pieces from the past year. In this selection, we choose the best foreign affairs coverage and reports from abroad.

After the wave: Devastation in Aceh, Indonesia. Photo: Jim Holmes/Design Pics/Corbis
Miracle of the tsunami
By Xan Rice - 22 December 16:21

A family lost a son and daughter in the Indian Ocean disaster. Ten years on, they may have found them.

A Palestinian man wearing a Santa Claus costume is confronted by an Israeli soldier during a demonstration in village near Bethlehem, 19 December. Photo: Getty
If Mary and Joseph tried to reach Bethlehem today, they would get stuck at an Israeli checkpoint
By Mehdi Hasan - 22 December 11:08

Why is it that the plight of persecuted Christians in the Middle East, or countries such as Sudan, has attracted the attention and anger of politicians in the west, yet the Christians of Palestine don’t get a look-in?

Pedestrians walk under a board listing foreign currency rates against the Russian ruble outside an exchange office in central Moscow, on December 17, 2014. Photo: Getty Images
Rouble trouble: oil's plunge has given Putin a serious headache
By Xan Rice - 17 December 14:21

The fall in oil's price is being felt keenly in Moscow, where the Putin government is struggling to cope with the knock-on effects.

Activists commemorate the second anniversary of the Delhi gang rape. Photo: Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty
Two years after the infamous Delhi gang rape, India’s women still aren’t safe
By Samira Shackle - 17 December 9:55

India is only just beginning to understand the scale of its sexual violence problem. The public discussion in the wake of the Nirbhaya case has been encouraging, but until it translates into action, little will change.

The All India Democratic Women's Association protests the death of two Dalit girls in Badaun. Photo: Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images
How India’s Dalit women are being empowered to fight endemic sexual violence
By Rahila Gupta - 16 December 17:21

The conviction rate for rape cases by India’s “untouchable” women stands at 2 per cent, compared to 24 per cent for women in general. However, they are starting to fight back.

Soldiers protect schoolchildren rescued from the site of the attack. Photo: A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images
In Pakistan, fear has become mundane – will the Peshawar attack change anything?
By Samira Shackle - 16 December 13:26

Over a hundred people are dead, many of them children. Even in the terror-stricken context of Pakistan, this attack is shocking.

Shia LeBeouf at the premiere of Nymphomaniac. Photo: Getty
From Shia LaBeouf to Rolling Stone's frat house story, the trouble with "I Believe Her"
By Sarah Ditum - 14 December 12:55

When we talk about rape victims, “I Believe Her” is powerful because it’s simple; because it’s simple, it slides into being simplistic. Both the alleged frat house gang rape described by Rolling Stone, and Shia LeBeouf's accusations against a woman who visited his art installation, reveal its strengths and weaknesses.

Project Martyr: the British doctor who went to work in Syria
By Martin Fletcher - 11 December 13:37

In 2011, Rami Habib, a 43-year-old doctor from Leicester, flew to Syria. Since then, he has watched the revolution against Bashar al-Assad fall apart – but he won’t give up.

Barack Obama with Chuck Hagel. Photo: Getty
The departure of a third defence secretary finally kills off Obama’s hopes of a “team of rivals”
By John Bew - 11 December 10:11

Chuck Hagel's resignation - the latest soap opera to hit the Obama adminstration - is a sign of severe dysfunction. The team of rivals has disintegrated, with many of them becoming a thorn in the president’s side as he limps on for a final two years.

Migrants prepare to cast off the beach at Shimbiro, Somalia, for a perilous journey across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen and beyond. Photo: Alixandra Fazina/Noor
From Africa to Kent: following in the footsteps of migrants
By Daniel Trilling - 11 December 9:47

The guardians of Fortress Europe are fighting a lost battle: poor migrants will always try to find a better life for themselves, or die in the attempt. Daniel Trilling traces their steps, from the Middle East and Africa to the Kent countryside.

A protester holds up a photo of Eric Garner during a demonstration in New York. Photo: Yana Paskova/Getty
The case of Eric Garner shows that cameras won’t stop police brutality of black people
By Matthew Pratt Guterl - 04 December 16:17

The assumption is that cameras are objective, silent witnesses that provide indisputable evidence, and also that people behave differently when they know a camera is capturing their actions. This is a fantasy.

Star factor: Marine has modernised the FN's image but remains a divisive figure even in her own party. Photo: Getty
At the gates of power: how Marine Le Pen is unnerving the French establishment
By Charles Bremner - 04 December 10:00

Under her father, the Front National was the pariah party of  France. Now Marine Le Pen has brought it closer to the mainstream – and people are getting worried. 

The “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” installation at the Tower of London. Photo: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty
The First World War in Africa has been all but ignored – it’s time to remember it
By Martin Plaut - 28 November 11:20

How many of the vast sea of poppies at the Tower represented the contribution of the South African forces who died in the campaign to take the German colony of what is today Namibia?

The road from Mecca: Saudi Arabia may be the only regional power capable of defeating IS. Photo: Bruno Hadjih/Anzenberger/Eyevine
Wahhabism to ISIS: how Saudi Arabia exported the main source of global terrorism
By Karen Armstrong - 27 November 10:00

Although IS is certainly an Islamic movement, it is neither typical nor mired in the distant past, because its roots are in Wahhabism, a form of Islam practised in Saudi Arabia that developed only in the 18th century.

Kosovo Albanians walk past posters featuring Kosovan Prime Minister Hashim Thaci in Pristina, 4 June. Photo: Getty
Letter from Kosovo: disarray in the heart of the Balkans
By Melanie McDonagh - 27 November 10:00

The small nation state has not had a government for six months and corruption and cynicism still rule.

A protestor holds her hands up in front of a police car in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty
Ferguson has reinforced racial fear and lethal stereotypes
By Peter Bloom - 26 November 11:44

As long as racial fear can be used to justify disproportionate force, killings like that of Mike Brown in Ferguson will continue.

Peruvian andean women victims of forced sterilizations during the administration of Peru's former President Alberto Fujimori, protest in Lima on February 13, 2014. Photo: Getty Images
The artistic campaign to help 300,000 Peruvian women sterilised against their will
By Iain Aitch - 24 November 11:39

During the 1990s, hundreds of thousands of poor women in rural areas of Peru were forcibly sterilised, often without their knowledge - and ahead of the next presidential election, artists are helping campaigners finally find justice.

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