New Statesman
Has the sun set on Golden Dawn?
By Yiannis Baboulias - 17 October 15:31

Whatever the crackdown against Golden Dawn means for Greece, the hope is now rekindled that the EU might be starting to see the rise of the far right as the threat that it is.

New Statesman
The choices in the Middle East are not between good and bad, but between bad and worse
By Uri Dromi - 17 October 15:25

A nuclear Iran will destabilise the Middle East and maybe push Saudi Arabia and other Sunni countries into a nuclear arms race. Oil supplies might be threatened. Yet Israel, though always capable of defending itself, shouldn’t be taking a seat in the firs

New Statesman
How Iran is coming in from the cold
By David Patrikarakos - 17 October 15:25

Israel calls Hassan Rowhani a “wolf in sheep’s clothing” – but is the new president of the Islamic Republic the west’s best hope of détente?

Afghan children.
The long goodbye to Afghanistan
By Alistair Bunkall - 17 October 15:20

Nad-e Ali's most senior politician, Mohammad Ibrahim, knows that the consequence of pushing too hard for change could be a Taliban resurgence. Striking this balance would be a challenge for a political veteran but Ibrahim is only 29 years old.

New Statesman
OPCW wins Nobel Peace Prize
By Holly Baxter - 11 October 10:18

Awarded the prize "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons".

Nelson Mandela
Indefinite delay: The last days of Nelson Mandela
By Hedley Twidle - 10 October 11:35

Throughout his life, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was recognised as a man of extraordinary self-possession, in strict control of his own image and physical presence.

New Statesman
The lessons for Europe two decades on from the war in Bosnia
By Robert Cooper - 10 October 11:19

For European countries, and for the United States, too, the shift from cold war to post-cold war had been too rapid for their thinking. Militarily their forces were still organised for a life-or-death struggle with the Warsaw Pact. Politically they could

New Statesman
What next for al-Shabab?
By Sophie McBain - 03 October 15:13

The decision to launch a terrorist attack abroad might reflect its inability to mount a successful offensive against African Union troops on the ground but it is also a mark of al-Shabab’s enduring strength.

New Statesman
Is Sub-Saharan Africa like Medieval Europe?
By Sophie McBain - 02 October 11:28

A new report suggests that African economies resemble those of Medieval Europe, and so hopes of sustained growth across the continent are unrealistic.

New Statesman
In Syria, doctors are dying before they can save lives
By Saleyha Ahsan - 02 October 8:59

Health care is being hampered by those involved in the conflict because of the Assad regime’s willingness to target doctors and hospitals.

Clinton with Doug Band.
Doug Band: Is this the man who could bring down Hillary Clinton?
By Alec MacGillis - 23 September 14:44

Doug Band came to the Clinton White House in 1995 - and was instrumental in creating the post-presidential philanthropic Clinton empire. Now he is striking out on his own, and causing all kinds of problems for Bill and Hillary.

New Statesman
What you need to know about al-Shabab
By Sophie McBain - 23 September 11:07

How the militant Somalia group behind the deadly attack on a Kenyan shopping centre formed, and why it is attacking foreign targets now.

What mooncakes in China can tell you about corruption and the environment
By Sophie McBain - 20 September 11:27

The Chinese tradition of giving away mooncakes in mid-autumn is surprisingly revealing.

New Statesman
The eagle interned as a Mossad agent, and other animal spies
By Sophie McBain - 19 September 16:55

Inside the bizarre world of animal espionage.

New Statesman
A quirk of Australian Prime Ministers
By Stephen Brasher - 19 September 13:40
All but one of Australia’s first 20 prime ministers have federal electoral divisions named after them. The first, Edmund Barton, a prime mover in federation, resigned after three years to become a high court judge.
 
Even in an age of “realists” and vigilantes, there is still cause for optimism
By John Pilger - 19 September 10:31

It's not too late for the world to learn the lesson of the US's foreign policy mistakes.

New Statesman
The unshakeable Angela Merkel, the pilot who weathered the storm
By Andrew Gimson - 19 September 8:07

As she faces re-election, the signs are that Angela Merkel’s commitment to the euro stretches only so far as the maths continue to work for Germany. Andrew Gimson on the roots of a genial but ruthlessly pragmatic politician.

New Statesman
What's so bad about fried chicken shops in Seoul and London?
By Sophie McBain - 18 September 10:54

Policy-makers in London and South Korea want to crack down on fried chicken shops, but for two very different reasons

New Statesman
The march that made Gandhi the Mahatma
By Martin Plaut - 17 September 13:33

One hundred years ago, Gandhi launched the decisive 1913 campaign that was to transform him into a figure of international stature. Later this year, we commemorate it.

New Statesman
How would Hezbollah respond to air strikes in Syria?
By Matthew Levitt - 17 September 9:35

While the US continues to deliberate their course of action, so, too, does Hezbollah. After depending upon the Syrian regime for so long, how will they retaliate in the event of air strikes?

New Statesman
We can’t script the outcomes of war
By Emile Simpson - 17 September 9:32

In seeking to break with a past tainted by Iraq, the Syria vote entrenches the legacy of that war. So what next?

New Statesman
A view on Syria from the US: Obama's enemies scent blood
By Nicholas Wapshott - 17 September 9:27

How did Obama find himself in such a rococo mess, pinned between haters in the House and his KGB rival?

A statue covered in plastic.
How Italians are keeping priceless artefacts out of private hands
By Daniel Trilling - 12 September 10:45

As the recession bites, state funding for Italy's museums and galleries has disappeared, and Italians are coming up with inventive forms of common ownership, to challenge power from the bottom up.

New Statesman
Brazil's protests have subsided - for now
By Claire Rigby - 12 September 10:35

The nationwide protests of the summer have mostly petered out, but Brazil's police and government still have a lot to answer for.

New Statesman
I was a fly on the wall in Assad’s office
By Uri Dromi - 12 September 10:21

If I were in Bashar al-Assad's office as Obama's speech at the White House was televised around the world, I think I would hear the following.

New Statesman
The divided town of Deir Ezzour is a microcosm of Syria’s bitter conflict
By Donatella Rovera - 12 September 7:49

As the threat of military intervention continues to loom over Syria, in a far-flung corner of the country, the town of Deir Ezzour offers an insight into the suffering of ordinary Syrians.

New Statesman
Will Syria be "another Iraq"?
By Sophie McBain - 09 September 13:10

Rhetoric aside, how does Syria today actually compare to Iraq in 2003?

From the Archive: Seamus Heaney on Ulster’s Troubles
By Seamus Heaney - 05 September 8:29

A piece by the future Nobel winner on the curious atmosphere in Ulster during the Troubles, first published in the <em>NS</em> of 1 July 1966.

Jeremy Bowen: Ice cream in Damascus
By Jeremy Bowen - 04 September 14:40

The central parts of Damascus feel more like a city at war than they did a year ago but physically the place is still almost untouched, finds the BBC's Middle East editor.

Meet the middle-aged women who are Britain's female sex tourists
By Julie Bindel - 29 August 7:40

When we picture a sex tourist, we usually think of a middle-aged man. But growing numbers of women are paying for a “holiday romance”.

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