Israeli soldiers at the border with Gaza today
Why the UK must end its military support for Israel
By Andrew Smith - 23 July 11:14

Andrew Smith from the Campaign Against Arms Trade argues that those who oppose Israel's actions in Gaza must acknowledge that Britain is implicitly supporting them through its military trade. 

What future? A medic helps a man in the wreckage of Shejaia, Gaza. Photo: Reuters
Uri Dromi: Despair is not an option in Gaza
By Uri Dromi - 22 July 17:36

The Israeli economist Yaacov Sheinin proposes a bold economic answer to the rockets – but with the repressive Hamas in charge, would it have any chance of materialising?

Pro-Russia rebels driving a tank through Donetsk today as international tensions increase over access to the MH17 crash site.
David Cameron: Russia faces tougher sanctions for MH17 crash
By Lucy Fisher - 21 July 16:24

The Prime Minister warned President Putin to stop aiding separatists in Ukraine, as responsibility for the MH17 crash was laid at Russia's feet.

An armed separatist guards in front of wagons containing the remains of victims from the downed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, at a railway station in the eastern Ukrainian town of Torez on July 21, 2014. Photo: Getty
If you lived in Russia, this is what you’d believe about the crash of MH17
By Julia Ioffe - 21 July 15:47

The Kremlin’s propaganda pushing support for the separatists in eastern Ukraine has been so effective that the Russian people have a completely different understanding of the downing of MH17 – and even Putin may be unable to hold back the jingoism.

Whoever shot down the Malaysia Airlines plane probably didn't know what they were aiming at
By Linda Kinstler - 18 July 14:57

It’s highly possible that the civilian airliner was mistaken for a Ukrainian Il-76 military transport plane.

Where are the diplomats, policy-makers and peace envoys? They're not in Gaza
By James Rodgers - 18 July 11:10

The BBC's former Gaza Strip correspondent on the way the world views the Palestinians, and how Israel transformed from a young David of a fledgling state to the Goliath of the occupation.

World Health Organisation spokesman Glenn Thomas, one of dozens of health experts and officials on MH17. Photo: AAP/United Nations, CC BY
Global Aids community mourns loss of friends and colleagues in MH17 crash
By Liz Minchin and Reema Rattan - 18 July 10:32

Many of those on flight MH17 were experts in Aids research, flying to Kuala Lumpur to make a connecting flight for the 20th International Aids Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

Airport groundstaff walk past Malaysia Airlines planes parked on the tarmac at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang on June 17, 2014. Photo: Getty Images
Malaysia Airlines passenger jet crashes in eastern Ukraine
By Ian Steadman - 17 July 18:23

Airliner crashes with 298 people on board.

Destroyed: ruins of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, blown up by the Taliban in 2001. Photo: Salim Saheb Ettaba/AFP/Getty
Darius Guppy: the US condemns Iran but allies itself with the ultra-conservative Saudi Arabia
By Darius Guppy - 17 July 10:00

Iran does has grave problems but family life is of a quality that has largely disappeared in the west and privacy is respected. Nor is there any sense of the oppression one finds in Wahhabi societies.

Palestinian firefighters survey the scene of a house destroyed during an Israeli strike. Photo: Getty
We single Israel out because we in the west are shamefully complicit in its crimes
By Mehdi Hasan - 16 July 17:45

The assault on Gaza has been a humanitarian disaster, yet the west's staunch support for Israel continues.

The Capitol building in Washington DC. Photo: Getty
The 2014 US midterms don’t mean anything
By Tod Lindberg - 16 July 12:39

Pundits and polls say the stakes couldn’t be higher. The reality is quite the opposite.

"I am one of thousands of women to have suffered – widows, orphans, victims of sexual abuse and rape".
“My son was killed... but it strengthened my commitment”
By Lucy Fisher - 11 July 11:36

Despite tragedy, two Afghan women explain how they refuse to be cowed by militants from carrying out their work.

People shelter in a large concrete pipe during a rocket attack on the southern Israeli village of Nitzan. Photo: Getty
Leader: Without a two-state solution, Israel is set on a course of war
By New Statesman - 10 July 15:16

So fragile is the “peace” between Israel and the Palestinians that it takes the smallest spark to light the fuse of war.

Libyan security forces advance during clashes with anti-government forces after an attack on a Benghazi police station in May 2014. Photo: Getty
Bullets and ballots in Benghazi
By Bel Trew - 10 July 11:42

Many residents of the Libyan city are preparing to leave for fear of more violence; others would leave if they could.

Iraqi women at the Khazair displacement camp for those caught-up in the fighting in Mosul. Photo: Getty
The hand-choppers of Isis are deluded: there is nothing Islamic about their caliphate
By Mehdi Hasan - 04 July 16:32

Have we gone back in time? The era of Muslim caliphates came to a close in 1924, when the Ottomans were toppled in Turkey.

A woman dressed up as Zwarte Piet. Photo: Getty.
A Dutch court has ruled that “Black Pete” is offensive. How did it take so long?
By Sophie McBain - 04 July 12:39

A Dutch court has ruled that the Dutch Christmas character, "Zwarte Piet" or Black Pete, a white man in blackface, is offensive.

Retribution? house destroyed by the Israeli army suspectedly in response to the murdered Israeli teenagers in Hebron on July 1. Photo: Getty
Death comes to Hebron, the birthplace of Judaism
By Edward Platt - 04 July 10:03

Hebron is the city of Abraham, the patriarch from whom all Jews, Muslims and, to a lesser extent, Christians claim descent. It is the emotional heart of the world’s most intractable conflict.

From Bandido to wannabe shahid: Morten Storm
Loneliness of the long-distance jihadi: Morten Storm’s double life inside al-Qaeda
By Anthony Loyd - 03 July 17:50

Storm, despite being a spy at the forefront of western intelligence efforts, was primarily driven by a desperate need to belong.

Nicolas Sarkozy appears on television to protest his innocence. Photo: Getty
Nicolas Sarkozy may recover from his latest scandal, but the political class will not be so lucky
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 03 July 16:42

Whatever the outcome of the ongoing corruption investigations, the damage done to trust in public officials will be long-lasting.

Bangladeshi commuters sit in traffic jam along a main road in Dhaka. Photo: Getty
Welcome to the traffic capital of the world
By Michael Hobbes - 03 July 13:36

What I learned from the crippling gridlock in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem was built by the Umayyad dynasty. Photo: Getty
What is a caliph – and why has the leader of Isis declared himself to be one?
By James Dawson - 03 July 12:52

The leader of Isis, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, has declared himself “Caliph Ibrahim”, thereby appropriating an Islamic title with a long, chequered history.

Slow-burn revolutionary: Princip in prison. Photo: Getty
Gavrilo Princip: the assassin who triggered the First World War
By Tim Butcher - 03 July 10:00

Princip was a slow-burn revolutionary, identifying himself with all Bosnians and committing himself to the ideal of winning freedom for all local Bosnians, not just local Serbs.

Sightless witness: British troops blinded by mustard gas in the German spring offensive. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty
Simon Heffer: First World War, the battle of the historians
By Simon Heffer - 03 July 10:00

From almost the opening shot, the Great War has been fought over by historians wishing to interpret and understand what happened and why. Their conflict is not over yet.

Spy on the wall: a painting of GCHQ displayed in the Mount Street Gallery, London in 2011. Photo: Getty
Laurie Penny: Oh look! There's a new bogeyman on the scene to justify online spying
By Laurie Penny - 03 July 10:00

Liam Fox insists that the “public will accept” increased surveillance because of the threat of terrorism. One suspects that if we don’t accept it, we’ll be made to.

Life goes on, for now: the famous Shahbandar café in Baghdad, 27 June. Photo: Getty
Lindsey Hilsum: “Apprehension and excitement at being back in Iraq is eclipsed by fury”
By Lindsey Hilsum - 03 July 10:00

Channel 4 News’s international editor returns to a country where she has strong memories and friendships but finds her movements hampered by customs officials. 

Algeria fans supporting their team in Marseilles. Photo: Getty
New attacks on French-Algerian citizens resurrect old, subtle forms of racism
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 02 July 16:56

The World Cup is just the latest political football to be kicked by the Front National’s Marine Le Pen, who suggested that “You are either French or Algerian”.

The Supreme Court in Washington DC. Photo: Getty
The Hobby Lobby decision was a victory for women’s rights
By Andrew Koppelman - 01 July 14:32

The Supreme Court has found a solution that is good for women and good for religious liberty.

Refuge: Kurdish women in Erbil feed Iraqi Christians fleeing violence in their villages. Photo: Getty
Fergal Keane: “Erbil is a haven. If you wanted a happier dream of Iraq, this is the place to visit”
By Fergal Keane - 01 July 11:00

The BBC correspondent travels to Iraq for the first time since 2003 to find quiet, fearful streets in Jalula but tranquility and tolerance in Iraq’s Kurdish capital. 

Justin Bieber: big in Manila. Photo: Getty.
The authorities keep trying to ban celebrities from Manila
By Barbara Speed - 30 June 15:53

Why is the Filipino capital so sensitive?

Adokiye in a promo shoot. Photo: daXclusive/adokiye.com
Nigerian popstar Adokiye offers Boko Haram her virginity for kidnapped schoolgirls' release
By Daisy Lafarge - 27 June 17:06

A rising star in Nigeria, frustrated at the fading news coverage of Boko Haram's abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls, has offered up her virginity.

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