Eugene de Kock at a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) hearing in Pretoria 1998. Photo: Walter Dhladhla/AFP/Getty
Releasing Prime Evil: what does Eugene de Kock’s parole mean for South Africa?
By Oliver Griffin - 30 January 17:14

Eugene de Kock, the former commander of the apartheid government’s infamous Vlakplaas unit, has been granted parole after serving 20 years of his two life sentences.

Halifax, Nova Scotia, where Rehtaeh Parsons lived and died. Photo: Brian Burke on Flickr, via Creative Commons
The UnSlut Project: Why we should have cared about Rehtaeh Parsons, and why we didn’t
By Emily Lindin - 30 January 16:15

We are horrified and disgusted by the reaction to the rape and death of Rehtaeh Parsons, but we aren’t surprised.

Syriza supporters wave flags at a 2014 rally. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
Don’t let the ridiculous smears fool you: Syriza is no party of the radical “far left”
By Mehdi Hasan - 29 January 15:34

Opposing the logic of neoliberal economics does not mean the Greeks have become Marxists.

In Iraqi security officer guards a church. Photo: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images
Paradise lost: is Christianity doomed in the Middle East?
By Gerard Russell - 29 January 9:10

A religious revival is just one of the factors leaving Christians deserting the Middle East. Diversity must be upheld.

Photo: Adam Berry/Getty Images
The news that GHCQ spies on journalists reveals a threat to a free, independent press
By Peter Wilby - 29 January 8:59

Broadchurch, Page 3, inequality, and the importance of journalistic independence.

The new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis in Athens. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
As Greeks pin their hopes on change, Syriza must stand firm against the country’s elite
By Yiannis Baboulias - 28 January 10:47

Can new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, political economist and game theory academic, negotiate solutions to inequality?

Prisoners and US army soldiers stand behind the gate of Buchenwald concentration camp, which reads "Jedem das seine" (To each his just deserts).  Photo: Eric Schwab/AFP/Getty
Buchenwald in 1945: Richard Crossman tells the story of a holocaust survivor
By Richard Crossman - 27 January 8:58

In this article first published on 23 June 1945, the future Labour minister and New Statesman editor Richard Crossman recounts the experiences of “K”, a survivor of the Buchenwald concentration camp.

A protester from the Westboro Baptist Church. Photo: Kimihiro Hoshino/AFP/Getty Images
“Love is wise and hatred is foolish”: how a son of the Westboro Baptist Church lost faith
By Aoife Moriarty - 26 January 14:35

The controversial church has a firm hold on many of its members. But Nate Phelps, son of the church’s infamous patriarch, wanted out.

Anti-austerity party Syriza wins Greece’s general election
By New Statesman - 26 January 8:35

The party’s leader, and future prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, has vowed to end Greece’s “five years of humiliation and pain”.

Syriza supporters attending a rally in central Athens. Photo: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images
Why the Greek election is so important
By Theo Papadopoulos - 23 January 10:48

If the pollsters are right, Syriza could win by a large margin, ending four decades of two-party rule in Greece.

Five million dollars in cash. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Leader: The 1 per cent and the masses
By New Statesman - 22 January 12:00

The thesis developed by Capital author Thomas Piketty is set to be vindicated, with the most prominent critiques of inequality now economic.

The 11 January Charlie Hebdo rally in Paris. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
France's Arab population is divided by an invisible wall
By Andrew Hussey - 22 January 11:42

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo shooting, we must address France's long war with its Arabs. Andrew Hussey reports from Paris.

New York. Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images
How the "mayor" of Gramercy Park keeps New York’s most exclusive spot private
By Rob Crilly - 22 January 10:08

Arlene Harrison runs a tight ship managing Gramercy Park.

A literal tiger mother. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
How Chinese success in education comes at a high cost
By Tanith Carey - 16 January 9:00

The school day often lasts nine hours – with breaks for eye massages to reduce eye strain and physical activity to keep concentration levels high.

An Amnesty protest outside the Saudi embassy in the Hague. Photo: Getty
Why we must help to stop the public flogging of Saudi blogger Raif Badawi
By Daniel Wickham - 15 January 18:53

Despite the crackdown at home, Saudi Arabia is angling to present itself as a supporter of free expression abroad.

French police at the Jewish supermarket in Paris where several people were taken hostage.
Slavoj Žižek on the Charlie Hebdo massacre: Are the worst really full of passionate intensity?
By Slavoj Zizek - 10 January 21:31

How fragile the belief of an Islamist must be if he feels threatened by a stupid caricature in a weekly satirical newspaper, says the Slovenian philosopher.

French police officers stand guard outside Paris' main mosque as people enter for Friday prayers. Photo: Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images
Is the Charlie Hebdo attack really a struggle over European values?
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 09 January 13:07

By targeting the French magazine, the attackers were able to deepen already profound rifts in French society and establish an atmosphere ripe for the recruitment of alienated youths.

Charlie Hebdo suspects killed and several hostages freed in France
By New Statesman - 09 January 9:24

Coordinated assaults by the French police have killed the gunmen behind Wednesday's attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine, and a gunman holding hostages in a Jewish supermarket.

Charlie Hebdo is written near flowers and candles left at the Place de la Republique at midday in solidarity with victims of yesterday's terrorist attack on January 8, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo: Getty Images
Charlie Hebdo: what we know so far
By New Statesman - 08 January 18:20

Police in France are still tracking the three men responsible for killing 12 people yesterday at the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. Mass vigils are held around the world.

Ukranian forces on patrol near Sloviansk. Photo: Reuters/Gleb Garanich
Meet the ordinary Ukrainians arming the country against Russian separatists
By David Patrikarakos - 08 January 16:55

In Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists, civilians keep the army equipped.

Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Leader: A reckoning in the eurozone
By New Statesman - 08 January 16:31

Angela Merkel claims she no longer fears the "Grexit", but will the public be drawn to extreme means?

In cartoons: the global response to the attack on Charlie Hebdo
By Anoosh Chakelian - 08 January 14:32

How cartoonists around the world reacted to the murder of journalists and cartoonists at the French satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo.

The offices of Charlie Hebdo in 2012. Photo: Getty Images
Murderous outrage in Paris as Charlie Hebdo, the magazine that mocked Mohammed, is attacked
By New Statesman - 07 January 11:46

Reports have 12 killed at Paris offices by men with automatic rifles.

A South African flag flies in front of a portrait of Mao. Photo: Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images
Why is the ANC following the example of the Chinese Communist Party?
By Martin Plaut - 06 January 17:48

South Africa’s ruling party appears to be forging ever-closer ties with the Chinese government.

Margaret Thatcher in 1985 at the Conservative Party Conference in Blackpool. Photo: Getty Images
Declassified papers reveal Thatcher's mixed response to South Africa's bloody 1985
By Martin Plaut - 30 December 13:03

Government records made public by the 30 year rule reveal Margaret Thatcher's diplomatic struggle with apartheid South Africa - arguing against sanctions, but in favour of the release of Nelson Mandela - during a year of bloodshed and dialogue for the region.

Missing AirAsia flight QZ8501: what we know so far
By New Statesman - 28 December 10:05

Air traffic control has lost contact with a passenger plane flying from Indonesia to Singapore with 162 people on board.

Migrants prepare to cast off the beach at Shimbiro, Somalia, for a perilous journey across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen and beyond. Photo: Alixandra Fazina/N
The best of the NS in 2014: World Affairs
By New Statesman - 23 December 19:20

Our best pieces from the past year. In this selection, we choose the best foreign affairs coverage and reports from abroad.

After the wave: Devastation in Aceh, Indonesia. Photo: Jim Holmes/Design Pics/Corbis
Miracle of the tsunami
By Xan Rice - 22 December 16:21

A family lost a son and daughter in the Indian Ocean disaster. Ten years on, they may have found them.

A Palestinian man wearing a Santa Claus costume is confronted by an Israeli soldier during a demonstration in village near Bethlehem, 19 December. Photo: Getty
If Mary and Joseph tried to reach Bethlehem today, they would get stuck at an Israeli checkpoint
By Mehdi Hasan - 22 December 11:08

Why is it that the plight of persecuted Christians in the Middle East, or countries such as Sudan, has attracted the attention and anger of politicians in the west, yet the Christians of Palestine don’t get a look-in?

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