The Armenian genocide memorial in Armenia. Photo: Flickr/z@doune
The Armenian genocide: the journey from victim to survivor
By Anoosh Chakelian - 24 April 9:59

The global activity around the Armenian genocide centenary is unprecedented – reality TV stars, western lawyers, Turkish intellectuals, metalheads and the Pope have all spoken out. But has this brought international recognition any closer?

A shipwrecked migrant and child on arrival in Greece. Photo: Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty
Mare Nostrum and the high price of guarding “our sea”
By Daniel Trilling - 23 April 12:18

It seems that the British government views migrant deaths as a useful deterrent, but criminal activity remains unaffected by the decision to let desperate migrants drown.

Islamic State faces a complex web of militant groups and violence in Pakistan
By Samira Shackle - 23 April 10:14

The signs of Islamic State moving into Pakistan are there, but what difference does this make in a nation already subject to similar horrors?

A woman at work in the Who Made Your Pants workshop. Photo: WMYP
Why don’t you care who made your clothes?
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 22 April 15:53

Two years after the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh, in which over a thousand people died, we still fail to appreciate the human cost of the clothes we wear.

The comeback kid. Photo:Getty
Why the Tories still have a spring in their step
By Stephen Bush - 22 April 12:57

Senior Conservatives are drawing comfort from Binyamin Netanyhu's late comeback in the Israeli elections.

A wreath floats off the coastline of Lampedusa after a boat sank there in 2013. Photo: Getty
What Katie Hopkins wrote was monstrous. But save your anger for the politicians who decided to let migrants drown
By Sarah Ditum - 20 April 9:29

It's nice to condemn the usefully loathsome Hopkins, but what she has said is merely a frank statement of the politics our government has been enacting at our borders in our name for years now.

System of a Down's Serj Tankian on his tour for recognition of the Armenian genocide
By Anoosh Chakelian - 17 April 15:10

The Armenian-American metal band, System of a Down, is doing a special tour for the Armenian genocide centenary. We catch up with the lead singer to find out why.

From Cecil Rhodes to Mahatma Gandhi: why is South Africa tearing its statues down?
By Martin Plaut - 16 April 17:20

Removing symbols of the past is an ineffective form of protest.

"The memory of the world": British attempts to save endangered Middle Eastern artefacts
By Tom Overton - 16 April 15:05

Rescuing and preserving Middle Eastern texts and artefacts in the "post-custodial" age.

Hillary Clinton at the world bank. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images
Can anyone stop the Clinton machine? Only time will tell
By Sasha Abramsky - 16 April 14:09

Coronations seldom proceed as planned in the drawn-out US primary season - the polish can't hold long without cracking somewhere.

Perestroika is turning 30 – so why aren't Russians celebrating?
By Jana Bakunina - 16 April 8:42

I was six when perestroika was introduced, and I remember the benefits. So why aren't Russians looking back fondly to Gorbachev's reforms?

Talking with terrorists is a dangerous business – but sometimes, it's the only way
By Richard Howitt - 09 April 15:38

In Colombia, the government and FARC are taking the first steps to a lasting peace.

Marine Le Pen. Photo: Getty
Marine Le Pen repudiates her (racist) dad Jean-Marie, calling his strategy political suicide
By Stephanie Boland - 08 April 15:53

Marine Le Pen has declared that her father Jean-Marie can no longer "hold the party hostage" following his recent remarks on the Holocaust.

John Oliver gets to the crux of why the Snowden leaks matter: mass surveillance of dick pics
By Ian Steadman - 07 April 12:59

"I guess I never thought about putting it in the context of your junk."

Illustration: John Thys/AFP/Getty
The mystery president: How the Charlie Hebdo shooting saved François Hollande's reputation
By Charles Bremner - 07 April 7:52

François Hollande was elected on a promise to rule from the left, but proved an unpopular figure – until the January attack on Charlie Hebdo offered an unexpected reprieve.

Roses from the funeral of a mafia victim. Photo: Getty
The pursuit of power: Why Isis loves spreadsheets and mafia bosses build chapels
By Ian Leslie - 02 April 14:55

We tend to think of terrorists and gangsters - the professionally violent – as opponents of the state. In fact, they are alternatives to it. Like politicians, gangsters and terrorists are interested in governance.

President-elect Mohammadu Buhari speaks after casting his vote at a polling station in Daura in Katsina State on March 28, 2015. Photo: Getty Images
Goodluck Jonathan concedes Nigerian presidential election
By New Statesman - 31 March 18:06

Ruling president peacefully concedes power to opponent after loss.

Trevor Noah, the South African comedian announced as the new host of the Daily Show. Photo: Justin Barlow/Gallo Images/Getty Images for MTV
Why outsiders like John Oliver and Trevor Noah are taking over American late night TV
By Esther Breger - 31 March 14:25

South African Trevor Noah, the newly-announced host of The Daily Show, joins Brits John Oliver and James Corden in the US’s coveted late-night slots.

Among the ruins: a collapsed building in Vuhlehirsk, eastern Ukraine, destroyed in the fighting between Ukrainian and rebel troops in February. Photo: JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/GETTY
Vladimir Putin is fighting for political survival – by provoking unrest in Ukraine
By John Simpson - 30 March 9:44

Writing from Sevastapol, the BBC World Affairs editor John Simpson explains how the Russian president is stalling - and his Crimean coup is an attempt to distract the west.

From popular leader to enemy of the west: it is 15 years since Putin came to power
By James Rodgers - 26 March 15:47

The Russian president has been in power in some capacity for 15 years. Is his political autumn finally looming?

Muslim members of the opposition All Progressives Congress (APC) pray during the presidential primary of the party in Lagos. Photo: PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images
Fleeting loyalties and revolving doors in Nigeria as the election approaches
By Tolu Ogunlesi - 26 March 15:30

As the PDP and APC battle it out on the billboards, alliances continue to shift in a country defined by its political changeability.

Bright lights, big city: a bustling crossing in the Shibuya ward of Tokyo in 2013. Photo: MARTIN ROEMERS / PANOS
What the west can learn from Japan’s “lost decades”
By Roland Kelts - 26 March 10:18

Roland Kelts wonders whether Japan-style stagnation would really be so bad in the west.

In figures: Lee Kuan Yew's Singapore
By Barbara Speed - 23 March 14:17

Singapore's former prime minister and founding father dies aged 91.

Why Labour is in crisis throughout the Anglosphere
By Tim Wigmore - 21 March 12:33

The leader of the New Zealand Labour Party on the shared challenges for social democrats.

Tomb raiders: leaders' graves have come in for posthumous revenge throughout history
By James Dawson - 20 March 15:16

Saddam Hussein's demolished tomb is resonant in symbolism, but it is not a unique story.

How terror under the Tudors is reflected in the barbarity of Islamic State
By Mathew Lyons - 20 March 12:33

Historical parallels of religious self-righteousness and nascent nationalism.

Israeli election: surprise victory for Binyamin Netanyahu's Likud party
By Anoosh Chakelian - 18 March 10:06

Although polls suggested a tight race, Israel's Prime Minister has won for another term.

An imam reads the Quran at the Mosque of the Sultan in Morocco, 1917. Detail from a contemporary illustration by Maurice Keating.
Tom Holland: We must not deny the religious roots of Islamic State
By Tom Holland - 17 March 10:17

Its jihadis call for a global caliphate. So why deny religion drives Isis?

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