An Iraqi-Kurdish woman and her child cross the border into Turkey after fleeing Kobane. Photo: Getty
“We needed to escape before they slaughtered our girls”
By Danielle Spencer - 30 September 16:16

On 16 September, the northern Syrian town of Kobane came under siege. Since then, reports state that more than 150,000 refugees have flooded into Turkey.

Obama is the fourth successive US president to order air strikes on Iraq. Photo: Getty
US air strikes on Isis add fuel to extremist ideologies
By Shiraz Maher - 25 September 16:56

The US risks amplifying the message that IS and similar groups have been trying to spread for years.

Forced out: Syrian Kurds fleeing IS cross the border into Turkey, 20 September. Photo: Getty
Assad’s men and the rebels agree on one thing: Islamic State is a danger to them all
By Jeremy Bowen - 25 September 10:00

The war in Syria is made of several smaller wars that sometimes run in parallel and sometimes cross over, like railway junctions on the express to hell.

Henry Morton Stanley and his "boy" Kalulu, c 1873. Photo: Getty
Letter from Kinshasa: on the trail of Henry Morton Stanley
By Michael Barrett - 25 September 10:00

Welsh-born explorer and journalist Stanley was employed in 1879 by the crown prince of Belgium, Leopold II, to annex Congo on his behalf.

In poverty-stricken areas of easter Afghanistan, girls are too often the ones at risk. Photo: Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images
Being a gynaecologist in Afghanistan is one of the most dangerous jobs in the world
By Horia Mosadiq - 24 September 12:56

A doctor in Afghanistan is using her medical training to provide healthcare and other support to women – at great risk to herself and her family.

An Iraqi-Kurdish fighter at a checkpoint west of Arbil. Photo: Getty
The first “war on terror” was a failure. Do we really need a sequel?
By Mehdi Hasan - 18 September 12:24

Just because there are no good options in Iraq doesn’t mean we have to pick the worst option.

New recruits: Ukrainian soldiers take a break during training near Yavorov, 16 September. Photo: Getty
Lindsey Hilsum: It is sobering to see how war has taken hold in Ukraine
By Lindsey Hilsum - 18 September 10:00

There is no question in my mind that Russia stirred up this war to destabilise Ukraine, but how will these people ever trust the government in Kyiv again?

Nuns cleaning their church for Easter in Caltanissetta, Sicily. Photo: Getty
A holy mess: the ongoing sacred soap opera of Radio Maria in Sicily
By Antonia Quirke - 18 September 9:20

In southern Sicily you often hear Maria in the background in shops, like an ongoing soap opera: the live Mass from Medjugorje, where there have been apparitions of the Madonna since 1981, or the replaying of news from Radio Vaticana.

Statesman and street fighter: Nixon showed foresight and skill in foreign policy but repeatedly resorted to sharp practices on the domestic front. Photo: Don Carl Steffen/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
Rethinking Nixon: forty years after Watergate, can the 37th president be rehabilitated?
By John Bew - 18 September 9:09

It is now four decades since Richard Milhous Nixon resigned in disgrace as US president – he remains reappraised but not rehabilitated.

In the slums of Manila, inequality is so bad that the worst off have no chance to protest
By Paul Roy - 18 September 8:42

Independent filmmaker Paul Roy recounts his experiences in the Philippines in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.

Romantic versions: an 1880 engraving depicting a US party in search of the missing Arctic explorer John Franklin and his team
What Canada – and John Franklin – can teach the UK about the independence game
By Noah Richler - 16 September 15:31

In the fortnight in which one of Franklin’s lost ships was found in the Canadian arctic, and Scotland – like Quebec before it – is voting on independence, the parallels between the UK and Canada have never been stronger. 

Islamic State video shows beheading of British aid worker David Haines
By Sophie McBain - 14 September 10:12

The Islamic State video appears to show the killing of a third Western hostage, aid worker David Haines, and ends with the warning that another British person will be next.

Members of the ANC Women’s League protest outside the court in Pretoria. Photo: Getty
Oscar Pistorius is not guilty of murdering Reeva Steenkamp, the woman he killed
By Sarah Ditum - 12 September 12:00

The South African athlete has been found guilty of culpable homicide, not murder, following the death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. In a world where men kill women and not the other way around, that means justice must bend to the male version of events.

Oscar Pistorius arriving at court. Photo: Getty
Oscar Pistorius found guilty of culpable homicide
By New Statesman - 12 September 10:04

The South African athlete has been cleared of premeditated and second-degree murder.

The new badlands: Yazidi women driven from their homes by Isis wait to be rescued from the Sinjar Mountains of Iraq
John Simpson: how do we respond to this worldwide summer of violence?
By John Simpson - 11 September 10:00

Iraq, Libya, Syria, Nigeria, Afghanistan are all in danger of becoming black holes in which the nastiest groups can thrive. The only credible solution is to turn them back into proper countries.

The outskirts of Sukkur in Pakistan in 2010. Photo: Getty
Inside jobs and Israeli stooges: why is the Muslim world in thrall to conspiracy theories?
By Mehdi Hasan - 05 September 12:29

The “We’ve been lied to” argument goes only so far. Scepticism may be evidence of a healthy and independent mindset; but conspiracism is a virus that feeds off insecurity and bitterness.

A woman pushes her bicycle past a non-exploded rocket in Ilovaisk, 50km southeast of Donetsk, 4 September. Photo: Getty
When one mistake can lead to catastrophe: what next for Ukraine?
By David Patrikarakos - 04 September 16:56

A ceasefire has been agreed but it remains in doubt whether Russia plans to conquer eastern Ukraine or establish a quasi-autonomous state there. 

A military official announces Barack Obama's arrival at the Nato Summit in Newport, Wales. Photo: Getty
With his foreign policy, Barack Obama is trying to win by playing a loser’s game
By Ian Leslie - 04 September 15:54

If you’re playing a loser’s game, strategy is unnecessary. You avoid errors, but in dangerous times risk being buffeted by events.

Keep the black flag flying: a show of strength in northern Raqqa province, Iraq, to celebrate the declaration of the caliphate, June 2014. Photo: Reuters
From Bin Laden to Isis: Why the roots of jihadi ideology run deep in Britain
By Shiraz Maher - 04 September 9:38

From Riyadh via London to Damascus, Baghdad and Isis – the jihadist surge.

Displaced Iraqi children play at the Bahrka camp near Arbil. Photo: Getty
In the face of the threat from Isis, Britain can no longer just follow America’s lead in the Middle East
By John Bew - 04 September 9:15

There are severe limits to what the UK can do as a middle-ranking power. But it can do better than firefighting every crisis with an emergency meeting of Cobra.

French President François Hollande. Photo: Getty
Where has the French Left gone?
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 03 September 12:09

The recent dissolution of the government reflects the increasing pressure on Hollande to turn around a dire economic outlook.

Steven Sotloff, centre in black helmet, in Libya in 2011. Photo: Getty
American journalist Steven Sotloff "beheaded by Islamic state"
By Helen Lewis - 02 September 20:43

A video claiming to show the killing of another kidnapped American journalist, Steven Sotloff, has been released.

Cambodian Inspectors examine suspected medicine in a crowded market along Thai-Cambodian border during an inspection July 23, 2010 in Pailin province, Cambodia. Photo: Getty Images
Unregulated fake medicines are threatening the fight against diseases like malaria
By Paul Newton - 29 August 12:11

There is currently no international law or body that can organise the detection and prevention of fake medicines - and it's a critical threat to our ability to fight deadly diseases.

Israeli soldiers in front of the barrier at the Qalandiya checkpoint between Ramallah and Jerusalem. Photo: Getty
How we grew up: an Israeli veteran on the dehumanising power of military control
By Yehuda Shaul - 29 August 11:41

Yehuda Shaul writes of how he and his friends learned to glorify power, and lost their ability to see Palestinians as people whose lives are no less valuable. Now, he and hundreds of others are working to end the occupation.

Displaced Palestinians gathered at a makeshift camp inside the Al-Shifa hospital gardens, where Mohammed is being treated. Photo: Getty
Under fire: what happened next to injured Mohammed and his family
By Donald Macintyre - 28 August 10:02

Two weeks ago Donald Macintyre reported from Gaza on the plight of ten-year-old Mohammed Badran, blinded in an Israeli air strike. Here, he gives an update on his treatment. 

The PM is not alone in failing to articulate a clear set of principles for this new era.
After Cameron’s summer of indecision, who will give Britain a coherent foreign policy again?
By George Eaton - 27 August 21:47

The PM is not alone in failing to articulate a clear set of principles for this new era. 

Spread risk: a Monrovia classroom serves as a rudimentary isolation ward. Photo: John Moore/Getty
West Africa on a hope and a prayer: the desperate efforts to contain ebola
By Charlotte Lytton - 27 August 17:00

The 16 August attack on an ebola clinic in the Liberian capital, Monrovia, is a sign of just how deeply western medicine is mistrusted.

Iraqi Turkmen guard a checkpoint in the northern town of Taza Khormato. Photo: Getty
Islamic State stands for the deaths of journalists and of free speech
By William Horsley - 22 August 12:59

Making a global spectacle of the murder of a western journalist carries a uniquely powerful propaganda message for the jihadists.

Under threat: displaced Iraqi Christians take refuge in the garden of Saint Joseph church on the outskirts of Erbil, 12 August. Photo: Getty
With the beheading of James Foley by Islamic State, a red line has been crossed at last
By Jonathan Rugman - 22 August 10:28

Channel 4 News’s foreign affairs correspondent Jonathan Rugman on a dramatic week spent in northern Iraq.

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