Pedestrians walk under a board listing foreign currency rates against the Russian ruble outside an exchange office in central Moscow, on December 17, 2014. Photo: Getty Images
Rouble trouble: oil's plunge has given Putin a serious headache
By Xan Rice - 17 December 14:21

The fall in oil's price is being felt keenly in Moscow, where the Putin government is struggling to cope with the knock-on effects.

Activists commemorate the second anniversary of the Delhi gang rape. Photo: Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty
Two years after the infamous Delhi gang rape, India’s women still aren’t safe
By Samira Shackle - 17 December 9:55

India is only just beginning to understand the scale of its sexual violence problem. The public discussion in the wake of the Nirbhaya case has been encouraging, but until it translates into action, little will change.

The All India Democratic Women's Association protests the death of two Dalit girls in Badaun. Photo: Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images
How India’s Dalit women are being empowered to fight endemic sexual violence
By Rahila Gupta - 16 December 17:21

The conviction rate for rape cases by India’s “untouchable” women stands at 2 per cent, compared to 24 per cent for women in general. However, they are starting to fight back.

Soldiers protect schoolchildren rescued from the site of the attack. Photo: A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images
In Pakistan, fear has become mundane – will the Peshawar attack change anything?
By Samira Shackle - 16 December 13:26

Over a hundred people are dead, many of them children. Even in the terror-stricken context of Pakistan, this attack is shocking.

Shia LeBeouf at the premiere of Nymphomaniac. Photo: Getty
From Shia LaBeouf to Rolling Stone's frat house story, the trouble with "I Believe Her"
By Sarah Ditum - 14 December 12:55

When we talk about rape victims, “I Believe Her” is powerful because it’s simple; because it’s simple, it slides into being simplistic. Both the alleged frat house gang rape described by Rolling Stone, and Shia LeBeouf's accusations against a woman who visited his art installation, reveal its strengths and weaknesses.

Project Martyr: the British doctor who went to work in Syria
By Martin Fletcher - 11 December 13:37

In 2011, Rami Habib, a 43-year-old doctor from Leicester, flew to Syria. Since then, he has watched the revolution against Bashar al-Assad fall apart – but he won’t give up.

Barack Obama with Chuck Hagel. Photo: Getty
The departure of a third defence secretary finally kills off Obama’s hopes of a “team of rivals”
By John Bew - 11 December 10:11

Chuck Hagel's resignation - the latest soap opera to hit the Obama adminstration - is a sign of severe dysfunction. The team of rivals has disintegrated, with many of them becoming a thorn in the president’s side as he limps on for a final two years.

Migrants prepare to cast off the beach at Shimbiro, Somalia, for a perilous journey across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen and beyond. Photo: Alixandra Fazina/Noor
From Africa to Kent: following in the footsteps of migrants
By Daniel Trilling - 11 December 9:47

The guardians of Fortress Europe are fighting a lost battle: poor migrants will always try to find a better life for themselves, or die in the attempt. Daniel Trilling traces their steps, from the Middle East and Africa to the Kent countryside.

A protester holds up a photo of Eric Garner during a demonstration in New York. Photo: Yana Paskova/Getty
The case of Eric Garner shows that cameras won’t stop police brutality of black people
By Matthew Pratt Guterl - 04 December 16:17

The assumption is that cameras are objective, silent witnesses that provide indisputable evidence, and also that people behave differently when they know a camera is capturing their actions. This is a fantasy.

Star factor: Marine has modernised the FN's image but remains a divisive figure even in her own party. Photo: Getty
At the gates of power: how Marine Le Pen is unnerving the French establishment
By Charles Bremner - 04 December 10:00

Under her father, the Front National was the pariah party of  France. Now Marine Le Pen has brought it closer to the mainstream – and people are getting worried. 

The “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” installation at the Tower of London. Photo: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty
The First World War in Africa has been all but ignored – it’s time to remember it
By Martin Plaut - 28 November 11:20

How many of the vast sea of poppies at the Tower represented the contribution of the South African forces who died in the campaign to take the German colony of what is today Namibia?

The road from Mecca: Saudi Arabia may be the only regional power capable of defeating IS. Photo: Bruno Hadjih/Anzenberger/Eyevine
Wahhabism to ISIS: how Saudi Arabia exported the main source of global terrorism
By Karen Armstrong - 27 November 10:00

Although IS is certainly an Islamic movement, it is neither typical nor mired in the distant past, because its roots are in Wahhabism, a form of Islam practised in Saudi Arabia that developed only in the 18th century.

Kosovo Albanians walk past posters featuring Kosovan Prime Minister Hashim Thaci in Pristina, 4 June. Photo: Getty
Letter from Kosovo: disarray in the heart of the Balkans
By Melanie McDonagh - 27 November 10:00

The small nation state has not had a government for six months and corruption and cynicism still rule.

A protestor holds her hands up in front of a police car in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty
Ferguson has reinforced racial fear and lethal stereotypes
By Peter Bloom - 26 November 11:44

As long as racial fear can be used to justify disproportionate force, killings like that of Mike Brown in Ferguson will continue.

Peruvian andean women victims of forced sterilizations during the administration of Peru's former President Alberto Fujimori, protest in Lima on February 13, 2014. Photo: Getty Images
The artistic campaign to help 300,000 Peruvian women sterilised against their will
By Iain Aitch - 24 November 11:39

During the 1990s, hundreds of thousands of poor women in rural areas of Peru were forcibly sterilised, often without their knowledge - and ahead of the next presidential election, artists are helping campaigners finally find justice.

An Assad billboard in the pro-government area of Aleppo. Photo: Getty
Jeremy Bowen: Why I tweet pictures of food from warzones
By Jeremy Bowen - 21 November 10:07

In Damascus, the war seems to have receded, and Bashar al-Assad looks more comfortable than ever.

May’s European Parliament elections did nothing to prompt a response to the EU’s “democratic deficit”. Photo: Getty
I was a teenage Europhile – but the EU’s sadistic austerity and lack of democracy changed my mind
By Mehdi Hasan - 20 November 11:15

Fast-forward 15-odd years and my wild-eyed teenage Europhilia is a source of much embarrassment.

Breaking up: Pro-independence activists after a symbolic vote on independence for Catalonia from Spain at a polling station in Barcelona on 9 November. Photo: Getty
Letter from Barcelona: Inside the battle for Catalan independence
By Jamie Maxwell - 20 November 10:00

This crisis could have been avoided. In recent years, Madrid has run a masterclass in how not to handle breakaway nationalism.

Pride, honour, poverty, patriotism: pro-Putin protesters parade through Moscow as he becomes president for the second time, May 2012. Photo: Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin
Putin is not Russia: the Kremlin’s view on events in Ukraine
By Robert Skidelsky - 20 November 10:00

War in Ukraine, economic woes and the decline of an autocrat, by Robert Skidelsky.

An Ottoman Piatsre (Sultan Selim III, 1789) and a Maria Theresa Thaler (later restrike of the 1780 coin). Photo: James Dawson
When it comes to coins, Isis is clearly not as good as gold
By James Dawson - 19 November 15:30

A plan by the terrorist organisation to issue its own currency – in gold – reveals a further attempt to play on the history of the early Caliphs.

Remembering: People gather to look the illumination on Boesebruecke bridge, where 25 years before thousands of East Germans first crossed into West Berlin. Photo: Getty
John Simpson: the raising of the Iron Curtain felt like a miracle
By John Simpson - 18 November 10:00

It all happened because of the use of a single German word, unverzüglich: “immediately”, or “at once”.

Theological explanations are a diversion when looking at the rise of Islamic State
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 13 November 15:11

Look beyond the smokescreen of Islamic "essence" when analysing the motives of Islamic State.

Unrest: Burkina Faso's opposition supporters protest against a proposal to amend the constitution to extend Compaore's 27-year-rule, 28 October. Photo: Getty
Exiled strongman: The tricky legacy of Blaise Compaoré
By Martin Plaut - 13 November 10:00

Impoverished Burkina Faso now has a military government, led by interim president Isaac Zida, who has promised a rapid handover to civilian rule but given no date for this transition.

Writing on the wall: Ifthekar Jaman in Syria, next to a stencil reading: "Islamic State of Iraq and Sham". He was killed in December 2013
From Portsmouth to Kobane: the British jihadis fighting for Isis
By Shiraz Maher - 06 November 10:00

What motivates the young men who leave Britain to join the murderous fanatics of Isis in the Middle East? Shiraz Maher spoke to dozens of them inside Syria to find out.

Wendy Davis, who looks likely to lose her bid to be Texas governor. Photo: Stewart F House/Getty
The US Midterms: the races you need to watch
By Nicky Woolf - 04 November 11:39

Rarely has an election elicited a louder national cry of “meh”. But there are some important races buried beneath the banality.

Fort Kent, Maine, where nurse Kaci Hickox has become the centre of a political controversy. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty
Ebola is the latest political battleground between America’s left and right
By David Millward - 31 October 12:21

The febrile atmosphere of the mid-term elections has turned the response to the disease into a way of playing politics.

Children wait to perform at a ceremony for the new French International School in Beijing, 19 October. Photo: Getty
Letter from Beijing: Inside the private schools educating China’s elite
By Zoe Alsop - 30 October 12:32

In recent years the number of private schools catering to Chinese nationals has grown rapidly. A Chinese-owned chain offering a Canadian curriculum dominates, with more than 30 schools across the country.

Guy Scott, who has just taken over as Zambia’s interim president. Photo: Monirul Bhuiyan/AFP/Getty Images
Zambia’s new president is white – and we need to get over it
By Martin Plaut - 30 October 10:53

The appointment of Guy Scott as Zambia’s interim president has been welcomed by the country's citizens. We should follow their lead.

Detail of David Wilkie's The Chelsea Pensioners Reading the Waterloo Dispatch (1822). Image: Apsley House/The Wellington Museum/Bridgeman Images
What the Battle of Waterloo teaches us about Europe today
By Brendan Simms - 30 October 9:00

The centenary of the start of the First World War has reopened old wounds. Yet Germany and Britain once enjoyed a special relationship – as when they defeated Napoleon at Waterloo – and they could do so again

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