"I am one of thousands of women to have suffered – widows, orphans, victims of sexual abuse and rape".
“My son was killed... but it strengthened my commitment”
By Lucy Fisher - 11 July 11:36

Despite tragedy, two Afghan women explain how they refuse to be cowed by militants from carrying out their work.

People shelter in a large concrete pipe during a rocket attack on the southern Israeli village of Nitzan. Photo: Getty
Leader: Without a two-state solution, Israel is set on a course of war
By New Statesman - 10 July 15:16

So fragile is the “peace” between Israel and the Palestinians that it takes the smallest spark to light the fuse of war.

Libyan security forces advance during clashes with anti-government forces after an attack on a Benghazi police station in May 2014. Photo: Getty
Bullets and ballots in Benghazi
By Bel Trew - 10 July 11:42

Many residents of the Libyan city are preparing to leave for fear of more violence; others would leave if they could.

Iraqi women at the Khazair displacement camp for those caught-up in the fighting in Mosul. Photo: Getty
The hand-choppers of Isis are deluded: there is nothing Islamic about their caliphate
By Mehdi Hasan - 04 July 16:32

Have we gone back in time? The era of Muslim caliphates came to a close in 1924, when the Ottomans were toppled in Turkey.

A woman dressed up as Zwarte Piet. Photo: Getty.
A Dutch court has ruled that “Black Pete” is offensive. How did it take so long?
By Sophie McBain - 04 July 12:39

A Dutch court has ruled that the Dutch Christmas character, "Zwarte Piet" or Black Pete, a white man in blackface, is offensive.

Retribution? house destroyed by the Israeli army suspectedly in response to the murdered Israeli teenagers in Hebron on July 1. Photo: Getty
Death comes to Hebron, the birthplace of Judaism
By Edward Platt - 04 July 10:03

Hebron is the city of Abraham, the patriarch from whom all Jews, Muslims and, to a lesser extent, Christians claim descent. It is the emotional heart of the world’s most intractable conflict.

From Bandido to wannabe shahid: Morten Storm
Loneliness of the long-distance jihadi: Morten Storm’s double life inside al-Qaeda
By Anthony Loyd - 03 July 17:50

Storm, despite being a spy at the forefront of western intelligence efforts, was primarily driven by a desperate need to belong.

Nicolas Sarkozy appears on television to protest his innocence. Photo: Getty
Nicolas Sarkozy may recover from his latest scandal, but the political class will not be so lucky
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 03 July 16:42

Whatever the outcome of the ongoing corruption investigations, the damage done to trust in public officials will be long-lasting.

Bangladeshi commuters sit in traffic jam along a main road in Dhaka. Photo: Getty
Welcome to the traffic capital of the world
By Michael Hobbes - 03 July 13:36

What I learned from the crippling gridlock in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem was built by the Umayyad dynasty. Photo: Getty
What is a caliph – and why has the leader of Isis declared himself to be one?
By James Dawson - 03 July 12:52

The leader of Isis, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, has declared himself “Caliph Ibrahim”, thereby appropriating an Islamic title with a long, chequered history.

Slow-burn revolutionary: Princip in prison. Photo: Getty
Gavrilo Princip: the assassin who triggered the First World War
By Tim Butcher - 03 July 10:00

Princip was a slow-burn revolutionary, identifying himself with all Bosnians and committing himself to the ideal of winning freedom for all local Bosnians, not just local Serbs.

Sightless witness: British troops blinded by mustard gas in the German spring offensive. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty
Simon Heffer: First World War, the battle of the historians
By Simon Heffer - 03 July 10:00

From almost the opening shot, the Great War has been fought over by historians wishing to interpret and understand what happened and why. Their conflict is not over yet.

Spy on the wall: a painting of GCHQ displayed in the Mount Street Gallery, London in 2011. Photo: Getty
Laurie Penny: Oh look! There's a new bogeyman on the scene to justify online spying
By Laurie Penny - 03 July 10:00

Liam Fox insists that the “public will accept” increased surveillance because of the threat of terrorism. One suspects that if we don’t accept it, we’ll be made to.

Life goes on, for now: the famous Shahbandar café in Baghdad, 27 June. Photo: Getty
Lindsey Hilsum: “Apprehension and excitement at being back in Iraq is eclipsed by fury”
By Lindsey Hilsum - 03 July 10:00

Channel 4 News’s international editor returns to a country where she has strong memories and friendships but finds her movements hampered by customs officials. 

Algeria fans supporting their team in Marseilles. Photo: Getty
New attacks on French-Algerian citizens resurrect old, subtle forms of racism
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 02 July 16:56

The World Cup is just the latest political football to be kicked by the Front National’s Marine Le Pen, who suggested that “You are either French or Algerian”.

The Supreme Court in Washington DC. Photo: Getty
The Hobby Lobby decision was a victory for women’s rights
By Andrew Koppelman - 01 July 14:32

The Supreme Court has found a solution that is good for women and good for religious liberty.

Refuge: Kurdish women in Erbil feed Iraqi Christians fleeing violence in their villages. Photo: Getty
Fergal Keane: “Erbil is a haven. If you wanted a happier dream of Iraq, this is the place to visit”
By Fergal Keane - 01 July 11:00

The BBC correspondent travels to Iraq for the first time since 2003 to find quiet, fearful streets in Jalula but tranquility and tolerance in Iraq’s Kurdish capital. 

Justin Bieber: big in Manila. Photo: Getty.
The authorities keep trying to ban celebrities from Manila
By Barbara Speed - 30 June 15:53

Why is the Filipino capital so sensitive?

Adokiye in a promo shoot. Photo: daXclusive/adokiye.com
Nigerian popstar Adokiye offers Boko Haram her virginity for kidnapped schoolgirls' release
By Daisy Lafarge - 27 June 17:06

A rising star in Nigeria, frustrated at the fading news coverage of Boko Haram's abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls, has offered up her virginity.

Four tips David Cameron can learn from world leaders on how to use Twitter
By Sophie McBain - 26 June 12:24

What tips can David Cameron learn from the annual Twiplomacy report, which studies how world leaders use Twitter? He needs a little help – not only because he's regularly insulted online, but because Barack Obama won't follow him back. 

Iraqi Kurdish soldiers prepare to fight Isis militants 20km south of Kirkuk, 23 June. Photo: Getty
In the Kurds’ make-do capital, Erbil, the message is clear: Iraq needs a three-state solution
By Jonathan Rugman - 26 June 10:00

Accompanied by a small army of peshmerga, I went as close as I dared to the front line, an army base in Kirkuk that the Iraqis had abandoned without putting up much of a fight.

Europe is not just another geopolitical power block. Photo: Getty
Slavoj Žižek: Only a radicalised left can save Europe
By Slavoj Zizek - 25 June 16:32

Austerity is not “too radical”, as some leftist critics claim, but, on the contrary, too superficial, an act of avoiding the true roots of the crisis, says Slavoj Žižek.

Iraqi Turkmen preparing to fight Isis militants last weekend
Isis and the global rise of non-state actors
By Lucy Fisher - 23 June 13:48

The recent onslaught by Isis isn't a rogue success for terrorist groups; non-state actors are on the rise worldwide. We should be watching and wary.

Shakir Waheib, a senior member of Isis, stands next to a burning police car in Anbar Province, Iraq
Blowback: who are Isis and why are young Brits fighting with them?
By John Bew and Shiraz Maher - 23 June 11:54

Hundreds of young British men are said to have joined the murderous group, first in Syria and now on its bloody incursion into Iraq. What happens when they come home?

Clinton voted for military action in Iraq but now admits she got it wrong. Photo: Bloomberg via Getty
The new stateswoman: Hillary Clinton’s steely idealism
By Douglas Alexander - 23 June 10:34

Will Hillary run for president in 2016? Her memoir is more interested in the fine art of diplomacy.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. Photo: Getty
The Sudanese dictatorship: twenty-five years of impunity
By Martin Plaut - 20 June 12:50

Once, the plight of Darfur’s two million refugees would have made front page news. Today they seldom make even a paragraph in the inside pages of British broadsheets, although the repression continues unabated.

The beach in Mombasa, Kenya. Photo: Getty
In Kenya, al-Shabab is using terror as a way of destroying the economy
By Samira Shackle - 20 June 11:12

The group’s long-term strategy is to destroy Kenya’s reputation as a safe tourist destination, damaging its economy and weakening its ability to successfully fight terrorism in Somalia.

Iraqi soldiers. Photo: Getty
The answer to Iraq’s current crisis is not the left re-fighting the arguments of 2003
By Dorian Lynskey - 19 June 12:01

As soon as Iraq plunges into another disaster, the 2003 reenactment society gets back together, presenting a simple case of cause and effect  but the ISIS insurgency wasn’t inevitable.

Smile! Despite being booed, the World Cup has gone well for Dilma Rousseff so far. Photo: Getty
Dilma Rousseff was booed but the riots haven’t started – and most people are enjoying the football
By Jonathan Wilson - 19 June 11:43

 A successful World Cup could create a mood of general contentment that might yet carry Rousseff to an election victory later this year.

A volunteer member of the Iraqi security service in the Shiite Muslim shrine city of Najaf. Photo: Getty
Leader: The solution to the Isis uprising must come from the Middle East
By New Statesman - 19 June 11:25

A lasting settlement cannot be imposed from the outside.

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