The "return" of Page 3 this week. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Challenging Page 3 has never been about breasts – it's about what decides the worth of women
By Stella Creasy - 24 January 12:01

The idea that there are "right" and "wrong" things to campaign about is not only controlling, it hampers the fight against all inequality.

Have we met before? The mutable Oscar Isaac.
Welcome to Oscar season — Oscar Isaac season, that is
By Ryan Gilbey - 22 January 12:52

Oscar Isaac exploits his unique charisma and mutable appearance in two of the biggest films released this awards season.

Campaigners protesting against Page 3 in 2012. Photo: Getty
The “return” of Page 3: the Sun revels in the chance to make women with opinions look stupid
By Sarah Ditum - 22 January 11:20

For one riotous day, women got to live in a world where in a small but symbolic way our bodies weren’t put on display as consumables.

Newspapers for sale in London. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Republish and be damned – what should our newspapers do with the Charlie Hebdo cartoons?
By Peter Wilby - 22 January 10:39

Calls to reprint the images leave editors with a difficult choice.

Britain and Ireland from above. Photo: NASA
Why speaking proper still counts as having an accent
By Stephanie Boland - 21 January 9:11

BBC English is still so dominant that it can be easy to forget it's a dialect. But calling its speakers "accentless" only heightens its power.

Turn Your Back On Page 3 campaigner
The Sun finally ditches tradition of topless models on Page 3
By Ashley Cowburn - 20 January 9:43

The legion of critics, who have campaigned for the scrapping of Page 3, have greeted the landmark moment in the history of Fleet Street.

There are different rules for women and men, both in front of and behind the camera. Photo: Getty
House of Lords wakes up to sexism in the newsroom
By Karen Ross - 19 January 12:07

Yet this report stops short of recognising the endemic sexism that means only one in every four expert contributors to flagship news programmes are women.

Marilyn Monroe, photographed on 3 December 1961, when she was 35. Photo: Archive/AFP/Getty Images
From Marilyn Monroe to Audrey Hepburn: why dead women make the ideal brand ambassadors
By Karen Yossman - 12 January 12:35

The trend for using long-dead actresses to front campaigns aimed at female consumers is at best tasteless and at worst insidious.

Rupert Murdoch had a thought about "Moslems" following Charlie Hebdo shooting
By Media Mole - 10 January 9:31

The media mogul says the world's 1.4 billion Muslims are "responsible" for the massacre of Charlie Hebdo's staff because they have not rooted out the "jihadist cancer".

Alan Rusbridger. Photo: Getty
The Guardian’s future, the Ukip bubble and your choice of death by snow or poisonous chicken
By Peter Wilby - 22 December 14:54

With Islamist terrorists, ebola and poisonous chickens threatening to overwhelm us, you would think the British have enough to worry about.

Finding them online is one thing, but how does one “rehabilitate” a paedophile? Photo: Getty
Is a zero-tolerance approach really the best way to stop paedophiles from abusing children?
By Hussein Kesvani - 19 December 15:01

A new security branch has been created to find paedophiles lurking on the “dark web”. Yet this zero-tolerance attitude is beginning to be called into question – for people who have never acted on their desires and want help, should we be locking them up at all?

John Simpson: “The BBC faces an existential crisis”
By John Simpson - 12 December 15:25

Under attack yet again from the government, the corporation must make savage cuts. But knee-jerk decisions could do it – and our national life – irreparable damage.

Alan Rusbridger. Photo: Getty
What does Alan Rusbridger’s departure mean for his beloved “digital-first” model?
By Peter Wilby - 11 December 11:21

The Guardian editor-in-chief, who has pioneered the paper’s online growth by making all content available on the internet for free, has announced that he is stepping down. What now?

Who will replace Alan Rusbridger at the Guardian?
By Harry Lambert - 10 December 18:40

We break down the runners and riders to be the next Guardian editor, as Alan Rusbridger announces his resignation after 20 years.

The New Republic’s logo – the magazine was founded in 1914.
The New Republic collapses as it turns 100
By Jason Cowley - 10 December 17:10

If the New Statesman has a sister publication, it is the New Republic. The magazine’s collapse provokes us to ask whether such an institution can be more than a vanity project without destroying its purpose and heritage, or losing its political identity altogether.

Mail Online indulges in horrific ebola clickbait
By Media Mole - 20 November 11:29

Absolutely no downside here, nooooooooooo.

Pedestrians cross a street in front of bars and restaurants in Hong Kong's Wanchai district,where Rurik Jutting lived. Image: Philippe Lopze/Getty.
Mail Online finds woman to blame for Hong Kong murders
By Media Mole - 03 November 13:57

That joke isn't funny any more.

Why the hell is there a sad orangutan in the Scottish and Southern Energy adverts?
By Anoosh Chakelian - 23 October 12:56

We've uncovered the TRUTH behind Maya, the SSE orangutan, and why she is so interested in how escalators work despite being from Borneo. Pulitzer plz.

Silhouettes representing French women victims of violence. Photo: Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images
My attacker was jailed. Do I have to be grateful?
By Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett - 22 October 10:41

As a female victim of male violence, things could always be worse. But despite what society and the media tell us, there are no “small mercies”, and we don’t have to be grateful.

Boys will be boys: as the Nineties progressed men's magazines "had only one button to press: sex". Photo: David Turner/Rex Features
Dylan Jones: The New Lad – my part in his downfall
By Dylan Jones - 16 October 10:00

Two decades ago, a new kind of man emerged intent on having it all. GQ editor Dylan Jones asks what happened to him.

A view of the press covering the formation of the Conservative-Lib Dem coalition in 2010. Photo: Getty
The British media has a terrible problem with “surface diversity”
By Monisha Rajesh - 14 October 16:27

At first glance, the British press appears to be embracing diversity. But scratch the surface and it is as white as ever, with a few non-white writers pushed into mostly covering only issues related to their identity.

A young journalist, carrying a camera and a gun, walks down a street in Aleppo, Syria. Photo: Getty
How do journalists keep themselves safe in warzones?
By Vicky Baker - 02 October 17:26

More exposure is needed on what is going on behind the scenes of foreign reporting – between the bylines, when the cameras stop rolling.

David Cameron is evil, says Channel 4 (almost)
By Media Mole - 01 October 12:36

It’s an easy mistake to make. . .

Get ready to see this face surrounded by some snazzy purple graphics. Photo: Getty
“This should be fun”: Jeremy Paxman to front Channel 4’s election night coverage
By Media Mole - 24 September 10:32

The former Newsnight host will be in the chair for Channel 4 on election night 2015.

Defender of Nick's faith: Davies targes Coulson and Murdoch but finds Rusbridger's paper flawless. Montage: Dan Murrell
The righteous mind: when reporting on phone-hacking turned into campaigning
By Stephen Glover - 11 September 10:00

The Guardian’s Nick Davies was courageous and correct to expose the practice – but he has crossed the line from reporter to campaigner.

Jennifer Lawrence. Photo: Getty
Online abuse, leaked nudes and revenge porn: this is nothing less than terrorism against women
By Helen Lewis - 03 September 9:57

The abuse of women on the internet, like the hacking of female celebrities' naked photos, is not just intended to hurt the individuals involved. These are  deliberately outrageous acts designed to create a spectacle and to instil fear in a target population - in other words, terrorism.

 Jeremy Paxman’s ability to create a sense of theatre even on a dull night is missed. Photo: BBC/Jeff Overs
Gee up, Newsnight: is it time to stop flogging the dying horse?
By Roger Mosey - 29 August 10:54

Twenty-four-hour news channels and all the commentary online make it ever harder to offer a definitive take on the day.

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