America decides

What US columnists are saying about Tuesday's election.

1. A Time for Choosing (New York Times)

Obama is the candidate of the Medicare status quo, argues Ross Douthat.

2. Is a Second Term Harder for Presidents to Win? (New Yorker)

Re-elections in America tend to be somewhat churlish affairs, says Jane Mayer.

3. The Morning After the Morning After (New York Times)

America’s biggest voting bloc - the centre-right/centre-left - will win on Tuesday, writes Thomas Friedman.

4. How do you vote for compromise? (Washington Post)

Compromise is on the ballot next week. But only one side seems genuinely interested in reaching it, argues E J Dionne Jr.

5. America's leftward tilt? (New York Times)

Both candidates in this election have benefited when they've turned left, argues Drew Westen.

6. Timid election campaign leaves no real winners (Washington Post)

Both candidates have run unimaginative campaigns, writes Dana Millbank.

7. Into the storm (New Yorker)

Hendrik Hertzberg asks how Hurricane Sandy will affect the election.

8. The likely winner - gridlock (Los Angeles Times)

Can either President Obama or Mitt Romney break the partisan logjam in Congress? Probably not, says Doyle McManus.

9. How Far Obama Has Fallen (Wall Street Journal)

Peggy Noonan traces the president's descent from historic figure to beleaguered incumbent in less than four years.

10. Who Will Be Right This Time: Karl Rove or Nate Silver? (The Atlantic)

Two pundits have dominated the conversation, says Connor Simpson.

The candidates for the US presidential election, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney (Photo: Getty Images)
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Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.