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We're hiring! Join the New Statesman web team as a science and tech writer

Applications close on 1 May.

 

Science and technology writer – newstatesman.com

The New Statesman is hiring a science and technology writer, who will work predominantly on the magazine’s website.

This a full-time paid job based in our office in London, with a salary to be determined depending on experience.

The successful candidate will write daily blog posts, as well as commission and edit guest pieces for newstatesman.com. There will also be some opportunities to write for the New Statesman’s sister sites May2015 and CityMetric, and for the print version of the magazine. This junior role would suit someone near the start of their career, who is comfortable with both news and features writing. Experience in online journalism, and demonstrable passion for sci-tech, are essential - as is the ability to work as part of a small, expanding team, often independently.

The ideal candidate will:

  • Have excellent writing skills
  • Be immersed in internet culture (eg know the correct pronunciation of “doge”, or at least have strong opinions about it)
  • Demonstrate the ability to assimilate new, unfamiliar topics at speed
  • Be familiar with major social media services like Twitter and Facebook, and possess an understanding of how to entice users to click on something they see
  • Have a strong background in science and/or technology (a degree or other qualification is helpful, but not essential)
  • Be passionate about your field (know your Periscope from your Meerkat, and your Enceladus from your Europa)
  • Be familiar with how to use a web content management system
  • Be able to use image editing software like Photoshop (though this is not essential)

Please apply with a CV and a covering letter to Deputy Editor Helen Lewis on helen @ newstatesman.co. uk by 5pm on 1 May 2015, with the subject line "NS job application". Interviews will be held in mid-May.

As part of your covering letter, please include a 200-word outline of how you think newstatesman.com could improve and expand its science and technology coverage, and suggest 3 science or tech stories you would like to cover (just a sentence on each is fine). Please don’t send large attachments of cuttings or portfolios – this will be requested at a later date if required.

NB Applications which do not follow this outline will not be considered.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

Wikipedia.
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No, Jeremy Corbyn did not refuse to condemn the IRA. Please stop saying he did

Guys, seriously.

Okay, I’ll bite. Someone’s gotta say it, so really might as well be me:

No, Jeremy Corbyn did not, this weekend, refuse to condemn the IRA. And no, his choice of words was not just “and all other forms of racism” all over again.

Can’t wait to read my mentions after this one.

Let’s take the two contentions there in order. The claim that Corbyn refused to condem the IRA relates to his appearance on Sky’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday programme yesterday. (For those who haven’t had the pleasure, it’s a weekly political programme, hosted by Sophy Ridge and broadcast on a Sunday. Don’t say I never teach you anything.)

Here’s how Sky’s website reported that interview:

 

The first paragraph of that story reads:

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has been criticised after he refused five times to directly condemn the IRA in an interview with Sky News.

The funny thing is, though, that the third paragraph of that story is this:

He said: “I condemn all the bombing by both the loyalists and the IRA.”

Apparently Jeremy Corbyn has been so widely criticised for refusing to condemn the IRA that people didn’t notice the bit where he specifically said that he condemned the IRA.

Hasn’t he done this before, though? Corbyn’s inability to say he that opposed anti-semitism without appending “and all other forms of racism” was widely – and, to my mind, rightly – criticised. These were weasel words, people argued: an attempt to deflect from a narrow subject where the hard left has often been in the wrong, to a broader one where it wasn’t.

Well, that pissed me off too: an inability to say simply “I oppose anti-semitism” made it look like he did not really think anti-semitism was that big a problem, an impression not relieved by, well, take your pick.

But no, to my mind, this....

“I condemn all the bombing by both the loyalists and the IRA.”

...is, despite its obvious structural similarities, not the same thing.

That’s because the “all other forms of racism thing” is an attempt to distract by bringing in something un-related. It implies that you can’t possibly be soft on anti-semitism if you were tough on Islamophobia or apartheid, and experience shows that simply isn’t true.

But loyalist bombing were not unrelated to IRA ones: they’re very related indeed. There really were atrocities committed on both sides of the Troubles, and while the fatalities were not numerically balanced, neither were they orders of magnitude apart.

As a result, specifically condemning both sides as Corbyn did seems like an entirely reasonable position to take. Far creepier, indeed, is to minimise one set of atrocities to score political points about something else entirely.

The point I’m making here isn’t really about Corbyn at all. Historically, his position on Northern Ireland has been pro-Republican, rather than pro-peace, and I’d be lying if I said I was entirely comfortable with that.

No, the point I’m making is about the media, and its bias against Labour. Whatever he may have said in the past, whatever may be written on his heart, yesterday morning Jeremy Corbyn condemned IRA bombings. This was the correct thing to do. His words were nonetheless reported as “Jeremy Corbyn refuses to condemn IRA”.

I mean, I don’t generally hold with blaming the mainstream media for politicians’ failures, but it’s a bit rum isn’t it?

Jonn Elledge edits the New Statesman's sister site CityMetric, and writes for the NS about subjects including politics, history and Daniel Hannan. You can find him on Twitter or Facebook.

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