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We're hiring! Join the New Statesman web team as a science and tech writer

Applications close on 1 May.

 

Science and technology writer – newstatesman.com

The New Statesman is hiring a science and technology writer, who will work predominantly on the magazine’s website.

This a full-time paid job based in our office in London, with a salary to be determined depending on experience.

The successful candidate will write daily blog posts, as well as commission and edit guest pieces for newstatesman.com. There will also be some opportunities to write for the New Statesman’s sister sites May2015 and CityMetric, and for the print version of the magazine. This junior role would suit someone near the start of their career, who is comfortable with both news and features writing. Experience in online journalism, and demonstrable passion for sci-tech, are essential - as is the ability to work as part of a small, expanding team, often independently.

The ideal candidate will:

  • Have excellent writing skills
  • Be immersed in internet culture (eg know the correct pronunciation of “doge”, or at least have strong opinions about it)
  • Demonstrate the ability to assimilate new, unfamiliar topics at speed
  • Be familiar with major social media services like Twitter and Facebook, and possess an understanding of how to entice users to click on something they see
  • Have a strong background in science and/or technology (a degree or other qualification is helpful, but not essential)
  • Be passionate about your field (know your Periscope from your Meerkat, and your Enceladus from your Europa)
  • Be familiar with how to use a web content management system
  • Be able to use image editing software like Photoshop (though this is not essential)

Please apply with a CV and a covering letter to Deputy Editor Helen Lewis on helen @ newstatesman.co. uk by 5pm on 1 May 2015, with the subject line "NS job application". Interviews will be held in mid-May.

As part of your covering letter, please include a 200-word outline of how you think newstatesman.com could improve and expand its science and technology coverage, and suggest 3 science or tech stories you would like to cover (just a sentence on each is fine). Please don’t send large attachments of cuttings or portfolios – this will be requested at a later date if required.

NB Applications which do not follow this outline will not be considered.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

Photo: Getty
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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.