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Solidarity with Charlie Hebdo

No journalist deserves violence or intimidation, no matter how offensive their work. The NS condemns the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo, and stands in solidarity with all murdered journalists around the world.

Yesterday, a group of journalists were murdered as they sat down for their editorial meeting. It was an attack on liberal values, and freedom of the press. Here at the New Statesman, we might not agree with all of Charlie Hebdo's editorial decisions, but no journalist deserves violence or threats for what they publish. 

Reporters Without Borders records that 66 journalists, 11 fixers and assistants, and 19 citizen journalists were killed last year in the pursuit of their duties. In solidarity with all murdered journalists, we are republishing a selection of Charlie Hebdo covers.

 

The press is doing well ... it's exciting the fools!


 

YES to 75% taxes on luxury whores!

 

 

"Charlie Hebdo must be veiled!"

The Pope in Rio: "Ready for anything to solicit clients!"

Putin sends Depardieu to Ukraine ("No to chemical weapons!")

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.