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Solidarity with Charlie Hebdo

No journalist deserves violence or intimidation, no matter how offensive their work. The NS condemns the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo, and stands in solidarity with all murdered journalists around the world.

Yesterday, a group of journalists were murdered as they sat down for their editorial meeting. It was an attack on liberal values, and freedom of the press. Here at the New Statesman, we might not agree with all of Charlie Hebdo's editorial decisions, but no journalist deserves violence or threats for what they publish. 

Reporters Without Borders records that 66 journalists, 11 fixers and assistants, and 19 citizen journalists were killed last year in the pursuit of their duties. In solidarity with all murdered journalists, we are republishing a selection of Charlie Hebdo covers.

 

The press is doing well ... it's exciting the fools!


 

YES to 75% taxes on luxury whores!

 

 

"Charlie Hebdo must be veiled!"

The Pope in Rio: "Ready for anything to solicit clients!"

Putin sends Depardieu to Ukraine ("No to chemical weapons!")

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.