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"He’s floating so high on his self-appointed sanctity": watch Glenda Jackson lay in to Iain Duncan Smith

Watch the Labour MP for Hampstead and Kilburn, Glenda Jackson, make a speech in the Commons shredding the Work and Pensions Secretary to smithereens.

Yesterday in the Commons during a work and pensions debate, the Labour MP Glenda Jackson made an epic speech tearing the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, Iain Duncan Smith, apart.

Highlights include:

We have all become used to the Secretary of State avoiding answering any kind of direct question or actually engaging in any of the serious issues which have to do with the destruction of the welfare state and the total and utter incompetence of his department by opting for a self-serving, sanctimonious sermon as opposed to any direct speech.

At some point I’m pretty certain he would like to be able to claim that can walk on water – he can’t.

Perhaps it is that he’s floating so high on his self-appointed sanctity that he has forgotten what is actually happening out there in this country as a direct result of his incompetence and failure to accept his responsibilities.

Watch here:

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.

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Donald Trump promises quick Brexit trade deal - but the pound still falls

The incoming President was talking to cast out Brexiteer, Michael Gove. 

The incoming President, Donald Trump, told the Brexiteer Michael Gove he would come up with a UK-US trade deal that was "good for both sides".

The man who styled himself "Mr Brexit" praised the vote in an interview for The Times

His belief that Britain is "doing great" is in marked contrast to the warning of current President, Barack Obama, that Brexit would put the country "at the back of the queue" for trade deals.

But while Brexiteers may be chuffed to have a friend in the White House, the markets think somewhat differently.

Over the past few days, reports emerged that the Prime Minister, Theresa May, is to outline plans for a "hard Brexit" with no guaranteed access to the single market in a speech on Tuesday.

The pound slipped to its lowest level against the dollar in three months, below $1.20, before creeping up slightly on Monday.

Nigel Green, founder and chief executive of the financial planners deVere Group, said on Friday: "A hard Brexit can be expected to significantly change the financial landscape. As such, people should start preparing for the shifting environment sooner rather than later."

It's hard to know the exact economic impact of Brexit, because Brexit - officially leaving the EU - hasn't happened yet. Brexiteers like Gove have attacked "experts" who they claim are simply talking down the economy. It is true that because of the slump in sterling, Britain's most international companies in the FTSE 100 are thriving. 

But the more that the government is forced to explain what it is hoping for, the better sense traders have of whether it will involve staying in the single market. And it seems that whatever the President-Elect says, they're not buying it.


 

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.