Former children's minister Tim Loughton. Photo: YouTube screengrab
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Former children's minister: "I'll name and shame Commons paedophiles"

Tim Loughton MP is threatening to name past high-profile “suspected paedophiles” in the Commons unless the government launches a full inquiry into historic MP sex abuse cases.

The former children’s minister Tim Loughton is considering using parliamentary privilege – immunity from legal action for a politician speaking in parliament – to “name and shame” high-profile past members of parliament suspected to be paedophiles.

Loughton, writing in the Daily Mail, is responding to the government’s decision not to implement an over-arching inquiry into the historical allegations of a paedophile ring operating in Westminster in the Eighties. A dossier containing the details of the allegations passed on to the then home secretary Leon Brittan has been lost – a revelation about which Loughton says he’s “gravely concerned”.

Both No 10 and the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg have voiced their belief that it’s best for the police to pursue these fresh inquiries, rather than launching a full inquiry into the alleged past ring of MP paedophiles. Clegg has said the police are in the “best position” to deal with the allegations, rather than the government calling an inquiry.

He added:

My view is, given the very serious criminal nature of these allegations, namely that there was a circle of people who hid what they were doing… abusing vulnerable children in children's homes, the only way to deliver justice, even in the years afterwards, is allow the police to get to the bottom of these things.

A spokesperson for the PM said: “If there are allegations or evidence then people should bring them forward to the appropriate authorities… We are saying very clearly that where there is wrong-doing it is absolutely right it should be the police who look into these matters.”

But Loughton, the Labour MP Simon Danczuk who has been at the forefront of fighting for these investigations, and 130 MPs who have been backing Danczuk's call for a “Hillsborough-style” inquiry, will be disappointed by this response.

The Home Office has until Monday to account for the missing dossier under the instruction of home affairs select committee chair Keith Vaz MP. With this development in sight, and Loughton’s threat to name names, it looks like this story – which has so far remained relatively under the radar – will be significantly bigger next week.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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