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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 

1. The Tory split on Europe can’t be reconciled (Times)

Cameron’s isolation over Juncker is just the latest manifestation of a 150-year fault line running though his party, writes Philip Collins. 

2. Interest rates are entering the twilight zone (Daily Telegraph)

Central banks are only storing up problems for the future by sticking to printing money, says Jeremy Warner. 

3. Labour should be chasing Green voters, not Ukip supporters (Guardian)

Ed Miliband would be wrong to adopt an anti-immigration message, says David Edgar. Despite Ukip's surge, it has not recruited large swaths of loyalist Labour voters.

4. Draghi’s action has silenced the doubters (Financial Times)

The interest rate is as low as it can go but other measures could be stepped up, says Gavyn Davies. 

5. D-day 1944-2014: a standard for our times (Guardian)

D-day gave us a story and a myth and a standard of judgment we do well to heed, says a Guardian editorial.

6. You can’t reduce a 300-year-old union to a mushy peas analogy (Daily Telegraph)

Unionists can win in Scotland if they stop patronising and find some poetry, says Fraser Nelson. 

7. A Taliban victory wouldn't be an unmitigated disaster for Afghanistan - unless the west failed to support it (Independent)

They were brutal and reductive, but they brought the country closer to peace than at any time before or since, writes Peter Popham. 

8. What Xi and Putin think about the west (Financial Times)

Stable relationships will require understanding and a willingness, when necessary, to be tough, writes Philip Stephens.

9. Obama’s control freaks freeze out the media (Times)

The daily White House briefing could end as the president keeps a tight grip on his image, writes Justin Webb. 

10. Secret justice may be right for Putin's Russia – but not peacetime Britain (Guardian)

Judges have become co-opted into the security apparatus, bartering liberty for an assumed safety, writes Simon Jenkins. 

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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