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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Queen's speeches are usually weird. But this one was weirder than usual (Guardian)

 Scotland's vote and the coalition's near end lent today an added air of make-believe, says Martin Kettle. The big stories are all outside parliament.

2. This coalition can be compared with our greatest governments (Daily Telegraph)

Like Thatcher and Attlee before them, David Cameron and Nick Clegg have changed Britain, writes Peter Oborne. 

3. Tiananmen split the workers of the world (Financial Times)

The opening of China through reform and investment has driven a wedge into the proletariat, writes John Gapper.

4. Slog, snog and snug: the Tories’ triple whammy (Times)

The Conservative manifesto will talk tough on public finances, woo Ukip voters and seek to reassure the low-paid, writes Tim Montgomerie.

5. Has Theresa May the mettle to follow the Iron Lady? (Daily Telegraph)

A row with Michael Gove over Muslim hardliners won’t tarnish the Home Secretary’s lustrous rise, says Sue Cameron. 

6. Critics should heed good IMF advice (Financial Times)

With the general election in the offing, the fund can help the parties produce sensible manifestos, says Chris Giles.

7. Recall Bill: This is not democracy, it's an incitement to malice and short-termism (Independent)

We already have a recall power in the British constitution, says John Rentoul. It is called a general election.

8. Newark shows how the sting could be taken out of Ukip (Guardian)

Deregulation and insecurity feed the anti-immigration backlash, writes Seumas Milne. A break with failed policies can draw the poison.

9. Putin on D-Day beaches violates the very values our heroes died for (Daily Mail)

The west should have uninvited Putin weeks ago, following his illegal annexation of Crimea, says Simon Heffer.

10. It isn’t just foreign countries that imperil women (Times)

A woman is menaced by her ex-partner, but the CPS is coldly indifferent to her plight, writes Jenni Russell.