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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 

1. Why Europe threatens Britain’s recovery (Daily Telegraph)

Our neighbours need to grow if we are to achieve our goal of a balanced economy, writes Jeremy Warner. 

2. No poll jitters: Axelrod can help Labour hit back, and hard (Guardian)

Ed Miliband may envy David Cameron's ratings, but his policies will be popular with voters, says Polly Toynbee. They just don't know it yet.

3. The Tories said coalition wouldn’t work - and they were dead right (Daily Telegraph)

Government by No 10’s select Quad has been an experiment that doesn’t bear repeating, says Fraser Nelson.

4. General election debates: blazing an online trail (Guardian)

It is not acceptable for there to be any doubt about the possibility of leaders' debates in the 2015 election, says a Guardian editorial. The public now expects them.

5. Europeans shake their fists at the world (Financial Times)

The populist trick has been to channel wider discontents into antipathy to the EU, writes Philip Stephens. 

6. Why Singh outranks Thatcher and Reagan (Times)

India’s prime minister is about to be roundly defeated, but the world’s largest democracy owes him a colossal debt, says Philip Collins. 

7. Renewable energy won't rid us of the horrors of coal (Guardian)

The Turkish disaster has brought home the grave costs of mining, writes Simon Jenkins. But hysteria-led policies will only make matters.

8. Border crossing (Daily Telegraph)

As Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, David Cameron is right to visit Scotland to persuade it to stay in the Union, says a Telegraph editorial.

9. Now at last Lib Dem ministers can say what they really think of their Tory bosses (Independent)

The end is approaching for the coalition's marriage of convenience, writes Nigel Morris. 

10. China must do as Japan says not as it did (Financial Times)

Beijing, like Tokyo in the 1980s, is trying to transform a state-controlled financial system, writes Gillian Tett. 

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.