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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 

1. British politics is broken - and only Nigel Farage is profiting (Daily Telegraph)

The Ukip chief is alone among the party leaders in being able to navigate our shattered political landscape, writes Peter Oborne.

2. Google ruling shows EU law is an ass (Financial Times)

The right to delete does not mean history should be hidden from the collective view, writes John Gapper. 

3. The tech firms hate the Google verdict, but they can't be beyond the law (Guardian)

The digital industry's attacks on the "right to be forgotten" ruling should be treated with icy scepticism, says Martin Kettle. 

4. The chief executive of Pfizer failed to dispel the impression that tax, and tax alone, brought him here (Independent)

He failed to persuade the impartial observer that his company’s promises were credible, says an Independent editorial. 

5. We are not at war over free school lunches (Times)

Both coalition partners support this policy – because it has been proved that it help pupils to get better results, write Michael Gove and David Laws.

6. The rise of Europe's far right will only be halted by a populism of the left (Guardian)

Ukip's advance is part of a wider discontent, fed by EU-wide austerity and revulsion against an anti-democratic stitch-up, says Seumas Milne. 

7. Free speech must trump the right to privacy (Times)

The European Court ruling on internet searches will protect the powerful, not those who make innocent mistakes, says David Aaronovitch.

8. The Jo Shuter saga shows that even heroes need scrutiny (Guardian)

The swindling super-head has demonstrated the folly of giving local leaders freedom over their budgets, says Steve Richards.

9. Little Hannah gets her first taste of immigration red tape (Daily Telegraph)

Trying to get a passport for a baby highlights the absurdities of our passports system, says Sue Cameron. 

10. Bank of England Governor Mark Carney parks rate bus (Daily Mail)

Fear of a rise in rates in the early months of next year looks to have retreated into the middle distance, writes Alex Brummer. 
#Match4Lara
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#Match4Lara: Lara has found her match, but the search for mixed-race donors isn't over

A UK blood cancer charity has seen an "unprecedented spike" in donors from mixed race and ethnic minority backgrounds since the campaign started. 

Lara Casalotti, the 24-year-old known round the world for her family's race to find her a stem cell donor, has found her match. As long as all goes ahead as planned, she will undergo a transplant in March.

Casalotti was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in December, and doctors predicted that she would need a stem cell transplant by April. As I wrote a few weeks ago, her Thai-Italian heritage was a stumbling block, both thanks to biology (successful donors tend to fit your racial profile), and the fact that mixed-race people only make up around 3 per cent of international stem cell registries. The number of non-mixed minorities is also relatively low. 

That's why Casalotti's family launched a high profile campaign in the US, Thailand, Italy and the US to encourage more people - especially those from mixed or minority backgrounds - to register. It worked: the family estimates that upwards of 20,000 people have signed up through the campaign in less than a month.

Anthony Nolan, the blood cancer charity, also reported an "unprecedented spike" of donors from black, Asian, ethcnic minority or mixed race backgrounds. At certain points in the campaign over half of those signing up were from these groups, the highest proportion ever seen by the charity. 

Interestingly, it's not particularly likely that the campaign found Casalotti her match. Patient confidentiality regulations protect the nationality and identity of the donor, but Emily Rosselli from Anthony Nolan tells me that most patients don't find their donors through individual campaigns: 

 It’s usually unlikely that an individual finds their own match through their own campaign purely because there are tens of thousands of tissue types out there and hundreds of people around the world joining donor registers every day (which currently stand at 26 million).

Though we can't know for sure, it's more likely that Casalotti's campaign will help scores of people from these backgrounds in future, as it has (and may continue to) increased donations from much-needed groups. To that end, the Match4Lara campaign is continuing: the family has said that drives and events over the next few weeks will go ahead. 

You can sign up to the registry in your country via the Match4Lara website here.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.