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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. How Britain's economy got dumber: Pfizer's bid for AstraZeneca (Guardian)

The true significance of the proposed takeover is how few options Britain has now that our manufacturing and research capacity has withered away, writes Aditya Chakrabortty

2. Despite the rifts, the coalition will stagger on until the election. But can you imagine Cameron and Clegg reunited in the rose garden? (Independent)

There are Tory MPs aching for a brief period of minority government, writes Steve Richards. 

3. A Swift way to curb Putin’s ambitions (Financial Times)

The evidence suggests that while the Russian president is bold, he is not mindlessly reckless, writes Gideon Rachman.

4. Spend, spend, spend: the chaotic world of free schools (Guardian)

While the crisis of primary places mounts, vast sums of public cash are being chucked at the education secretary's pet, writes John Harris.

5. This time the coalition is fighting for real (Times)

There is nothing phoney about rows over free schools or knife crime, writes Rachel Sylvester. And it can only get worse as the election nears.

6. Look in the mirror, Gary. You did a bad thing (Times)

The prime minister, who believes in the Big Society, should take a strong line against the Take That tax avoiders, says Hugo Rifkind. 

7. Now troubled children are an investment opportunity (Guardian)

An 18% return on the most disturbed and needy children in care homes is the extreme end of Britain's outsourcing culture, writes Polly Toynbee. 

8. If the super-rich like Gary Barlow paid their share, maybe the taxman wouldn't have to pick our pockets (Daily Mail)

The old saying is untrue, that the only certainties in life are death and taxes: for the super-rich only the former applies, writes Max Hastings. 

9. A day in the life of David Cameron (Daily Telegraph)

In the age of social media, meeting voters is more demanding than ever before, writes Benedict Brogan. On the road with the Prime Minister, we see how he copes.

10. Tories fail to grasp the minority vote (Financial Times)

A party stands or falls by the gut impression it creates when voters pay attention to politics, writes Janan Ganesh.