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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. How Britain's economy got dumber: Pfizer's bid for AstraZeneca (Guardian)

The true significance of the proposed takeover is how few options Britain has now that our manufacturing and research capacity has withered away, writes Aditya Chakrabortty

2. Despite the rifts, the coalition will stagger on until the election. But can you imagine Cameron and Clegg reunited in the rose garden? (Independent)

There are Tory MPs aching for a brief period of minority government, writes Steve Richards. 

3. A Swift way to curb Putin’s ambitions (Financial Times)

The evidence suggests that while the Russian president is bold, he is not mindlessly reckless, writes Gideon Rachman.

4. Spend, spend, spend: the chaotic world of free schools (Guardian)

While the crisis of primary places mounts, vast sums of public cash are being chucked at the education secretary's pet, writes John Harris.

5. This time the coalition is fighting for real (Times)

There is nothing phoney about rows over free schools or knife crime, writes Rachel Sylvester. And it can only get worse as the election nears.

6. Look in the mirror, Gary. You did a bad thing (Times)

The prime minister, who believes in the Big Society, should take a strong line against the Take That tax avoiders, says Hugo Rifkind. 

7. Now troubled children are an investment opportunity (Guardian)

An 18% return on the most disturbed and needy children in care homes is the extreme end of Britain's outsourcing culture, writes Polly Toynbee. 

8. If the super-rich like Gary Barlow paid their share, maybe the taxman wouldn't have to pick our pockets (Daily Mail)

The old saying is untrue, that the only certainties in life are death and taxes: for the super-rich only the former applies, writes Max Hastings. 

9. A day in the life of David Cameron (Daily Telegraph)

In the age of social media, meeting voters is more demanding than ever before, writes Benedict Brogan. On the road with the Prime Minister, we see how he copes.

10. Tories fail to grasp the minority vote (Financial Times)

A party stands or falls by the gut impression it creates when voters pay attention to politics, writes Janan Ganesh.

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Jeremy Corbyn will stay on the Labour leadership ballot paper, judge rules

Labour donor Michael Foster had challenged the decision at the High Court.

The High Court has ruled that Jeremy Corbyn should be allowed to automatically run again for Labour leader after the decision of the party's National Executive Committee was challenged. 

Corbyn declared it a "waste of time" and an attempt to overturn the right of Labour members to choose their leader.

The decision ends the hope of some anti-Corbyn Labour members that he could be excluded from the contest altogether.

The legal challenge had been brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate, who maintained he was simply seeking the views of experts.

But when the experts spoke, it was in Corbyn's favour. 

The ruling said: "Accordingly, the Judge accepted that the decision of the NEC was correct and that Mr Corbyn was entitled to be a candidate in the forthcoming election without the need for nominations."

This judgement was "wholly unaffected by political considerations", it added. 

Corbyn said: "I welcome the decision by the High Court to respect the democracy of the Labour Party.

"This has been a waste of time and resources when our party should be focused on holding the government to account.

"There should have been no question of the right of half a million Labour party members to choose their own leader being overturned. If anything, the aim should be to expand the number of voters in this election. I hope all candidates and supporters will reject any attempt to prolong this process, and that we can now proceed with the election in a comradely and respectful manner."

Iain McNicol, general secretary of the Labour Party, said: “We are delighted that the Court has upheld the authority and decision of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party. 

“We will continue with the leadership election as agreed by the NEC."

If Corbyn had been excluded, he would have had to seek the nomination of 51 MPs, which would have been difficult since just 40 voted against the no confidence motion in him. He would therefore have been effectively excluded from running. 

Owen Smith, the candidate backed by rebel MPs, told the BBC earlier he believed Corbyn should stay on the ballot paper. 

He said after the judgement: “I’m pleased the court has done the right thing and ruled that Jeremy should be on the ballot. This now puts to bed any questions about the process, so we can get on with discussing the issues that really matter."

The news was greeted with celebration by Corbyn supporters.