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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Homes, health and fairer taxes could put Ed in No 10 (Daily Telegraph)

With the 2015 general election exactly a year away, voters deserve to hear the truth on Labour’s big ideas, writes Mary Riddell. 

2. Small is beautiful. The NHS needs to be broken up (Guardian)

Our once-revered health service is now a national scandal, says Simon Jenkins. After so many failed reforms, it's clear that central control no longer works.

3. My contender for the stupid socialist award (Times)

If Thomas Piketty thinks that today’s capitalism has failed, he needs to explain what he is going to replace it with, says Daniel Finkelstein. 

4. Look who's not voting Tory (Daily Telegraph)

Ethnic minorities are backing Labour in droves, writes Daniel Hannan. But one country has bucked the western trend for immigrants to support centre-left parties.

5. Can South Africa's revolution move beyond the ANC? (Guardian)

South Africa has done many things right, but its post-apartheid politicians still need to develop a truly pluralist system, says Mary Dejevsky. 

6. The stats and the markets concur: Europe is no longer an economic basket case (Independent)

Next year, if forecasts prove right, no European country will see its economy decline, writes Hamish McRae.

7.  A game for children to build on dreams (Financial Times)

‘Minecraft’, like Lego, helps turn imagination into reality, writes Helen Lewis.

8. The new Mussolini and his axis of the macho (Times)

Europe’s nationalists see Putin as an ally, writes Roger Boyes. But, as Ukraine shows, he has no respect for borders.

9. Wipe out rentiers with cheap money (Financial Times)

Cautious savers no longer serve a useful economic purpose, says Martin Wolf. 

10. Zero-hours jobseekers? Britain's given up on employee rights (Guardian)

We have developed a system where poverty can be actively enforced by brutal employers on their powerless staff, writes Zoe Williams.