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We’re hiring! Apply to edit The Staggers, the new Statesman’s online politics hub

Following the promotion of Stephen Bush, we’re looking for a new Staggers editor.

The New Statesman is looking for a journalist to edit its award-winning politics blog, The Staggers. Following in the footsteps of our two previous editors, George Eaton and Stephen Bush - now politics editor and special correspondent - the successful applicant will continue the Staggers tradition of breaking news and providing high-quality opinion and analysis.

Our new Staggers editor must have:

 

- An excellent understanding of Westminster politics, and a keen interest in local and regional politics.

- The ability to write quick, clear and concise analysis of major political news stories.

- Good contacts among MPs, peers and the think-tank world.

- Experience of using social media to promote stories.

- A willingness to work early/late starts and weekends as required.

 

There will also be opportunities to contribute to the New Statesman magazine, and to our podcasts and events.

 

If you are interested in applying, please send an email to helen @ newstatesman co uk with the subject line "Staggers editor - application". Please include a covering letter with:

 

- A brief biography with any relevant experience, or a fuller CV if you prefer (as a PDF or Word document)

- Up to 300 words on the strengths and weaknesses of the Staggers, and what you would do with the role.  

 

The deadline for applications is 12pm on 3 May. 

The role is a paid, full-time position based in our office in Blackfriars. Salary dependent on experience.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.