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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Giving the public a chance to voice their opinion could be the only way to improve the NHS (Independent)

No politician is allowed to pledge a penny of extra spending on any cause, notes Steve Richards.

2. Salmond is wrong. England is not the enemy (Times)

The nationalists paint the rest of the UK as right-wing and Ukippy, writes Hugo Rifkind. It’s actually a tolerant and multicultural nation.

3. Cost-of-living masks Labour ideas crisis (Financial Times)

The wisest thing the UK opposition could do is outline the spending cuts it would make in power, says Janan Ganesh.

4. Can no one in Britain be trusted to run an election campaign? (Daily Telegraph)

We are led by politicians who have become so beholden to the mechanics of politics that they must look abroad for their vision and their credibility, writes Benedict Brogan.

5. Obama’s Asia policy is ambiguous (Financial Times)

The rise of China is the big strategic challenge facing the US and should focus its attention, writes Gideon Rachman.

6. Sorry students, I lied to you. University is about desperation, not aspiration (Guardian)

The graduate premium is going down as tuition fees and debt go up: but for today's students that's just the tip of the iceberg, says Laurie Penny.

7. Stamp duty is worse than a mansion tax (Times)

George Osborne taxes people who move house more than smokers, writes Ross Clark. It’s bad for the economy.

8. Where would you rather live – Great Britain or little England? (Guardian)

If you agree that Britain is better off in the EU, make yourself heard now, says Nick Clegg. The Lib Dems can't win this argument alone.

9. Scots are not morally superior. That's why I believe in solidarity with the folk living south of Carlisle (Guardian)

Whatever the Scottish separatists claim, our shared beliefs in equality and social justice don't stop at the border, says Tom Morton. 

10. Restoring trust in the European parliament (Financial Times)

Europe’s assembly must act to tackle its internal abuses, says an FT editorial. 

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As Donald Trump once asked, how do you impeach a President?

Starting the process is much easier than you might think. 

Yes, on Friday, Donald Trump will be inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States. And no, you can’t skip the next four years.

But look on the bright side. Those four years might never happen. On the one hand, he could tweet the nuclear codes before the day is out. On the other, his party might reach for their own nuclear button – impeachment. 

So, how exactly can you impeach a President? Here is our rough guide.

OK, what does impeachment actually mean?

Impeachment is the power to remove an elected official for misconduct. Here’s the relevant clause of the US Constitution:

“The President, Vice President and all Civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.”

Impeachment is actually a legacy of British constitutional history, and dates back as far as 1376, but according to our own parliamentary website, in the UK “this procedure is considered obsolete”. 

It’s up to the US Congress to decide whether to impeach and convict a President. Both houses are controlled by the Republicans, so impeaching Trump would mean turning against one who is – technically at least – one of their own. Since he’s already insulted the neighbouring country, supported discrimination against Muslim immigrants and mocked a disabled reporter, their impeachment threshold seems pretty high. But let’s imagine he surpasses himself. What next?

The impeachment process

Members of the House of Representatives – the lower chamber of the Congress – can start the impeachment process. They in turn may be encouraged to do so by voters. For example, there is a whole Wikipedia page dedicated to people who tried to impeach Barack Obama. One Impeach Obama supporter simply gave his reason as stopping the President from “pushing his agenda”. Another wanted to do so on the grounds of gross incompetence...

But for an impeachment attempt to actually work, the impeacher needs to get the support of the house. If a majority agree with the idea of impeaching the elected official, they nominate members to act as prosecutors during the subsequent trial. This takes place in the Senate, the upper house of Congress. In most impeachments, the Senate acts as judge and jury, but when a President is impeached, the chief justice of the United States presides.     

Two-thirds of the Senate must vote for impeachment in order to convict. 

What are the chances of impeaching Donald Trump?

So if Trump does something that even he can’t tweet away, and enough angry voters email their representatives, Congress can begin the process of impeachment. But will that be enough to get him out?

It’s often assumed that Richard Nixon was kicked out because he was impeached for the cover up known as the Watergate Scandal. In fact, we’ll never know, because he resigned before the House could vote on the process.

Two decades later, the House got further with Bill Clinton. When it emerged Clinton had an affair with Monica Lewinsky, an intern, he initially denied it. But after nearly 14 hours of debate, the Republican-controlled House of Representatives decided to impeach him on grounds including perjury and obstruction of justice.

In the Senate trial, Clinton’s defenders argued that his actions did not threaten the liberty of the people. The majority of Senators voted to acquit him. 

The only other Presidential impeachment took place in 1868, when President Andrew Johnson, removed a rabble-rouser from his Cabinet. The guilty vote fell short of the two-thirds majority, and he was acquitted.

So, what’s the chances of impeaching Trump? I’ll leave you with some numbers…

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.