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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Giving the public a chance to voice their opinion could be the only way to improve the NHS (Independent)

No politician is allowed to pledge a penny of extra spending on any cause, notes Steve Richards.

2. Salmond is wrong. England is not the enemy (Times)

The nationalists paint the rest of the UK as right-wing and Ukippy, writes Hugo Rifkind. It’s actually a tolerant and multicultural nation.

3. Cost-of-living masks Labour ideas crisis (Financial Times)

The wisest thing the UK opposition could do is outline the spending cuts it would make in power, says Janan Ganesh.

4. Can no one in Britain be trusted to run an election campaign? (Daily Telegraph)

We are led by politicians who have become so beholden to the mechanics of politics that they must look abroad for their vision and their credibility, writes Benedict Brogan.

5. Obama’s Asia policy is ambiguous (Financial Times)

The rise of China is the big strategic challenge facing the US and should focus its attention, writes Gideon Rachman.

6. Sorry students, I lied to you. University is about desperation, not aspiration (Guardian)

The graduate premium is going down as tuition fees and debt go up: but for today's students that's just the tip of the iceberg, says Laurie Penny.

7. Stamp duty is worse than a mansion tax (Times)

George Osborne taxes people who move house more than smokers, writes Ross Clark. It’s bad for the economy.

8. Where would you rather live – Great Britain or little England? (Guardian)

If you agree that Britain is better off in the EU, make yourself heard now, says Nick Clegg. The Lib Dems can't win this argument alone.

9. Scots are not morally superior. That's why I believe in solidarity with the folk living south of Carlisle (Guardian)

Whatever the Scottish separatists claim, our shared beliefs in equality and social justice don't stop at the border, says Tom Morton. 

10. Restoring trust in the European parliament (Financial Times)

Europe’s assembly must act to tackle its internal abuses, says an FT editorial. 

Oli Scarff/ Getty
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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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